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  #31  
Old 07-05-2020, 01:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by n2omike View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick7274 View Post
Depends on your target. If your shooting for score your probably going to shoot a higher score with a Kidd 2 stage
The title of the thread says 'for hunting'. A super fine 'hair' trigger isn't recommended for hunting. Too easy to fire before you're ready, and not safe. For hunting, the BX is an excellent trigger. Cheap too. Excellent upgrade from the stock unit.

I had stock triggers in my guns, replaced them with BX units, then sent the stock ones with the guns when having full CPC Tune Ups done. Stock triggers were extremely stiff. BX was a huge improvement, and the modified stock units were an improvement over the BX.

After using all of those, the BX is a GREAT bang for the buck. If you can't hit your shots with a BX trigger... It's not the trigger.

For hunting well beyond .22lr range, a nice 2-stage trigger can be helpful. For shooting around 50 yards (.22lr range) it's completely unnecessary. That being said, I learned on heavy, crappy triggers. If a person has never learned to shoot guns so equipped, it may be a little harder. I was going to mention spending almost $300 on a trigger for a gun originally costing $200 is kind of silly. But, these are toys, and logic/ration is not the guide. Fun and Passion is. <img src="https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums/images/smilies/smile.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Smilie" class="inlineimg" />
The OP said for recreational shooting and hunting. I would hardly call a Kidd single stage trigger a "hair trigger". You can actually adjust the weight on a Kidd single stage to be heavier than a BX (just without the creep and grittiness). I agree that for the price the BX is a good trigger, especially for a complete unit. But all the BX really is is an OEM 10/22 trigger with a lighter pull weight. I didn't tell the OP that he has to buy a Kidd nor would I ever tell anyone what to spend their own $ on. I'm just simply stating that the Kidd trigger is the best there is for the 10/22. If $ is a concern and your just looking to build a slightly upgraded 10/22 plinker/hunter then the BX will work. That doesn't mean it's the best option. And at $100 for a Kidd kit your not exactly breaking the bank if you were to choose that route. As far as putting a $300 trigger on a $200 gun I agree that would be pointless. $300 is for a Kidd complete 2 stage trigger w/speed lever. A $200 10/22 would be a 100% OEM carbine. I also wouldn't recommend a 2 stage trigger for a hunting rifle. Most people who are looking to upgrade their 10/22's don't usually stop at just the trigger. Of all the 10/22's I own not a single one of them has all OEM parts and most of them don't have any Ruger parts with the exception of the BX-10 magazines.
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  #32  
Old 07-05-2020, 10:07 AM
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It's all about perspective. These guns can be purchased brand new for a little over $200. Most people add a scope and call it 'good'. Some will spend a little more. Some will spend a LOT more. If you ever go to sell the gun, the more you put into it, the more you'll lose when it comes time to move it on, as upgrades are only worth pennies on the dollar when it comes to sell.

The majority will have less than $500 in their guns, including scope. The recommended trigger weight for hunting is around 3 lbs... which is right about where the $60 BX comes in. Is there room for improvement? Sure. But, it's not so heavy that you're going to pull off target compared to another 2-3 lb trigger. For the vast majority of guys out there, it's a great upgrade for the price... and a very good unit for hunting and informal target shooting.

For guns such as the ones in the above post, where the owner has spent $1,000+... a $200 - $300 trigger makes more sense, as they are going for a more 'ultimate' build. As we do with many hobbies, these guns have zoomed past 'practical hunter/plinker' like a freight train. They are objects of passion, and their owners will spend whatever it takes to have the best for their 'baby'!

I have NOTHING against high end stuff. I have a nitroused, 4-speed, drag slicked, wheel standing 1966 mustang that I drag race, and there's NOTHING cheap or practical about that! lol When it comes to your passions, 'practical' is rarely your guide.

So, I have nothing against builds like seen in the above post. Love them! I'm just not going to recommend the same triggers he uses in those for a 'practical' build intended for hunting and informal target shooting.

Good Luck!

Last edited by n2omike; 07-05-2020 at 10:11 AM.
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  #33  
Old 07-05-2020, 12:37 PM
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I agree with everything you said in the above post. But the OP asked what would be the "best" option so I mentioned the "best" trigger for the 10/22. If he had said he bought an OEM 10/22 carbine and just wants a slightly better trigger then I agree the BX would be a great option. But he is doing a 10/22 build which usually means starting with an aftermarket receiver and barrel.
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  #34  
Old 07-06-2020, 11:53 AM
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For a field gun, I want a crisp 2-3lbs. The feel is more important than letoff. A crisp and predictable 5lbs is better than a mushy 2lbs. For that, I like the factory polymer housing stuff with Power Custom innards. I prefer a factory contour trigger (not straight or flat faced) with overtravel adjustment, their long serrated mag and bolt releases. Coupled with their hammer/sear kit. The KIDD single stage is also very good but I reserve my two stage for target work.

Last edited by CraigC; 07-06-2020 at 11:55 AM.
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  #35  
Old 07-06-2020, 12:10 PM
CraigC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by n2omike View Post
It's all about perspective. These guns can be purchased brand new for a little over $200. Most people add a scope and call it 'good'. Some will spend a little more. Some will spend a LOT more. If you ever go to sell the gun, the more you put into it, the more you'll lose when it comes time to move it on, as upgrades are only worth pennies on the dollar when it comes to sell.

The majority will have less than $500 in their guns, including scope. The recommended trigger weight for hunting is around 3 lbs... which is right about where the $60 BX comes in. Is there room for improvement? Sure. But, it's not so heavy that you're going to pull off target compared to another 2-3 lb trigger. For the vast majority of guys out there, it's a great upgrade for the price... and a very good unit for hunting and informal target shooting.

For guns such as the ones in the above post, where the owner has spent $1,000+... a $200 - $300 trigger makes more sense, as they are going for a more 'ultimate' build. As we do with many hobbies, these guns have zoomed past 'practical hunter/plinker' like a freight train. They are objects of passion, and their owners will spend whatever it takes to have the best for their 'baby'!

So, I have nothing against builds like seen in the above post. Love them! I'm just not going to recommend the same triggers he uses in those for a 'practical' build intended for hunting and informal target shooting.

Good Luck!
I don't really look at it that way. It doesn't really matter to me what some components cost relative to others. For me, it's more about putting the exact parts I want to work together for a particular rifle or purpose. How much they cost relative to each other is really irrelevant. I've got over $1500 in one rifle that still has a factory barrel and only $120 in trigger upgrades. While a KIDD single stage rides in a rifle with a factory barrel but a $330 walnut stock. If I count the $1700 optic, I have over $3200 in my Nordic precision build with a KIDD barrel but the same $120 trigger upgrades as the first one I mentioned. I may or may not put the KIDD two stage in it, just depends on where I want to go with it.

I guess it's the same reason why I have $500 guns with $1000 grips.
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