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  #1  
Old 07-27-2014, 12:00 PM
Turboshaft
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Weaver G4 Disassembly



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So I've been searching online and also on the forum search tool for instructions on disassembly, cleaning, and reassembly of the old Weaver G4 scopes. I've found at least one post where a fellow took his scope apart and shot photos of the pieces. I was hoping to find some instructive hand-holding on what to do and what not to do. I also checked the scope stickies and didn't find what I wanted. Can anyone suggest a thread or website to look at? Much appreciated...
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  #2  
Old 07-27-2014, 09:06 PM
ShootsAtSky
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First, make sure you have an hour or two undisturbed, you do not want to be interrupted and have to come back to it later.

Get something to sort the parts into, some like ice cube trays, I like a bunch of small zip locks.

Do not use any solvents like acetone, turpentine or mineral spirits on an old scope, if it has compound lens they were glued with balsam and it will dissolve. Depending on the year alcohol may be safe, but not always. I use a really mild glasses cleaner and try to clean only the face of the lens, not the sides.

The eyepiece just unscrews, then you need either a spanner wrench to remove the lock ring on the objective, or you may be able to use a small screw driver very carefully in the slot of the lock ring. If it sticks, order the spanner, don't try to use a hammer to drive the screwdriver, it will tear up the slot in the lock ring, probably bung up the treads and possibly scratch the lens.

Get the ends off and out of the way before you remove the adjuster assembly in the middle, things will get very loose inside once you do.

As you disassemble it, work on a big sheet of paper, legal size, back of a target, butcher paper, etc. Make lots of notes of each piece as it comes off of the tube. Place in the tube, any screws, lock rings, spacers, focus mask, etc. When you remove a lens or mask (the brass disk at 7 O'clock below, it is curved to one side), immediately note which side any curves go to, and if it is a compound (there is usually a fine line visible on the edge) be sure you know which side is which. Clean them each as you go, so you have minimal handling. If your hands get greasy or dirty clean them before you continue.

The brass and aluminum pieces can be cleaned with alcohol or acetone, but be sure it's dry before assembling, you don't want the fumes inside.

You might want to put a really light coat of silicone grease on the adjuster band contact points and on the lock rings. I use Plumbers Grease that can be found at any hardware store. Again, keep everything as clean and dry as possible, any oil, dust or grease near a lens will attract dust since these scopes are not sealed.

Here's some pics of a JC Higgens version of an early B4, not exactly the same as a G4, but very close. This one was really foggy, and had a problem with the cross hairs jumping around.



The cross hair problem was easy, the brass adjuster ring had slipped forward just a bit, which let the adjuster screw slip on the edge, causing the ring to jump in different directions as you turned the screw. Look at the green ring on the brass at the 2 O'clock position.

The foggy problem turned out badly, I found a broken lens in the adjuster section, probably caused by someone cranking on the adjuster trying to get the cross hairs to stay consistant.

You can see the bad lens (after cleaning) at the 8 O'clock position in this pic.



Hope this helps, they are really easy to work on, just go slow, take notes, keep it clean and it should turn out well.


Bob
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  #3  
Old 08-02-2014, 04:14 AM
Turboshaft
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Thanks Bob, It looks like you provided what I was looking for, much abliged.
Don
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  #4  
Old 10-31-2014, 08:50 PM
KimFella

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Disassemble a Weaver B4

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShootsAtSky View Post

Bob
Excellent advise. Thanks Bob.

But my B4 doesn't have that one screw in your picture. I'm assuming the insides are pretty much the same as yours, but how do I get them out? The inner tube(s) appear to be quite firmly fixed. I've tried ..... gently ..... pressing from each end and also tried to rotate it by pressing (again gently) on the edges of the screw holes, but there is no movement. I don't see any other fasteners. Should that tube (adjuster assembly?) just slide out?

I'm a little leery of trying a heat gun or WD40.

Thanks.

Mike K
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  #5  
Old 10-31-2014, 09:33 PM
ShootsAtSky
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It probably had some water or cleaning solvent get inside between the steel body and the brass or aluminum inner tube and the corrosion has them locked together. You're on the right track pushing from each end, but use a flash light to make sure there isn't an alignment tab or dimple on one side.

You might try turning a dowel to size, or a find or make a washer that just fits and tap against that. You might also be able to run the adjuster base screws back in and get it to break loose with some tapping on them.

Just be sure you know where the lenses are before you push or tap.

Bob

Last edited by ShootsAtSky; 10-31-2014 at 09:36 PM.
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  #6  
Old 11-01-2014, 10:46 AM
KimFella

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShootsAtSky View Post
It probably had some water or cleaning solvent get inside between the steel body and the brass or aluminum inner tube and the corrosion has them locked together. You're on the right track pushing from each end, but use a flash light to make sure there isn't an alignment tab or dimple on one side.

You might try turning a dowel to size, or a find or make a washer that just fits and tap against that. You might also be able to run the adjuster base screws back in and get it to break loose with some tapping on them.

Just be sure you know where the lenses are before you push or tap.

Bob
Thanks. I saw another of your photobucket photos showing a 'L' shaped keyway on the inner tube. If mine has the same thing I may have been trying to push it the wrong way. Or it is seized and has to be pushed - with your dowel - just a smidgeon to break the corrosion before it can be turned out of the lock. If mine is like yours then it will only push toward the eyepiece as the post/pin/dimple that mates with the keyway will prevent it going the other way.

Thanks again Bob

Mike K
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  #7  
Old 11-01-2014, 10:06 PM
KimFella

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Did it!

O.K.
I did it. Trimmed down a 3/4" dowel to fit IN the 3/4" tube and g e n t l y pressed the Aluminum tube out and found a small brass keeper ring threaded in one end. Carefully turned that out and was able to take out the insides of that tube.

The steel tube was seriously corroded inside with some corrosion on the larger aluminum tube and just plain grease and dirt on the rest of the parts.

I didn't take the ocular or objective lenses apart, and the three others in the alum tube all appear to be symetrical (convex both sides) but I put a tiny ink dot on the ocular side and made sure I kept that side oriented when I cleaned them, and put another dot on them to be sure which side was which when I reassembled the scope.

The reticle is definitely gone (well that was why I wanted to take it apart). I used a fine marker to put an "X" on the lens closest to the adjustment turrets, just to see if that was where the reticle should go. Apparently not. Does anyone know where the reticle goes? Must have been a hair or spider web one to start with. There is nowhere to attach a wire one.

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  #8  
Old 05-20-2019, 12:56 PM
peteyboy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShootsAtSky View Post
First, make sure you have an hour or two undisturbed, you do not want to be interrupted and have to come back to it later.

Get something to sort the parts into, some like ice cube trays, I like a bunch of small zip locks.

Do not use any solvents like acetone, turpentine or mineral spirits on an old scope, if it has compound lens they were glued with balsam and it will dissolve. Depending on the year alcohol may be safe, but not always. I use a really mild glasses cleaner and try to clean only the face of the lens, not the sides.

The eyepiece just unscrews, then you need either a spanner wrench to remove the lock ring on the objective, or you may be able to use a small screw driver very carefully in the slot of the lock ring. If it sticks, order the spanner, don't try to use a hammer to drive the screwdriver, it will tear up the slot in the lock ring, probably bung up the treads and possibly scratch the lens.

Get the ends off and out of the way before you remove the adjuster assembly in the middle, things will get very loose inside once you do.

As you disassemble it, work on a big sheet of paper, legal size, back of a target, butcher paper, etc. Make lots of notes of each piece as it comes off of the tube. Place in the tube, any screws, lock rings, spacers, focus mask, etc. When you remove a lens or mask (the brass disk at 7 O'clock below, it is curved to one side), immediately note which side any curves go to, and if it is a compound (there is usually a fine line visible on the edge) be sure you know which side is which. Clean them each as you go, so you have minimal handling. If your hands get greasy or dirty clean them before you continue.

The brass and aluminum pieces can be cleaned with alcohol or acetone, but be sure it's dry before assembling, you don't want the fumes inside.

You might want to put a really light coat of silicone grease on the adjuster band contact points and on the lock rings. I use Plumbers Grease that can be found at any hardware store. Again, keep everything as clean and dry as possible, any oil, dust or grease near a lens will attract dust since these scopes are not sealed.

Here's some pics of a JC Higgens version of an early B4, not exactly the same as a G4, but very close. This one was really foggy, and had a problem with the cross hairs jumping around.



The cross hair problem was easy, the brass adjuster ring had slipped forward just a bit, which let the adjuster screw slip on the edge, causing the ring to jump in different directions as you turned the screw. Look at the green ring on the brass at the 2 O'clock position.

The foggy problem turned out badly, I found a broken lens in the adjuster section, probably caused by someone cranking on the adjuster trying to get the cross hairs to stay consistant.

You can see the bad lens (after cleaning) at the 8 O'clock position in this pic.



Hope this helps, they are really easy to work on, just go slow, take notes, keep it clean and it should turn out well.


Bob
Still pertinent today, and with the Weaver product line ending, all those old vintage Weaver scopes are now collector items as well as being functional scopes. Treat them well lads.
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