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  #61  
Old 02-02-2013, 07:04 AM
lemonheadmech
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Thats good to know.
What are your thoughts on protecting the action once completed from tarnishing; a clear coat or just regular after handling wipe down?
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  #62  
Old 02-05-2013, 08:29 AM
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Have you thought about a barrel? A blue octogon one would look nice. Another option may be to make your own out of brass (with a steel barrel liner). I am not a metallurgist, but they make them out of aluminum. It seems like it would work. I have seen a pistol or two chambered for .22 short made of brass.
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  #63  
Old 02-05-2013, 01:00 PM
Snyiper
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Just thinking about a brass octagon barrel with a steel liner, that may get heavy fast....Look good but tough to hold for any amount of time....
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  #64  
Old 02-05-2013, 01:39 PM
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Copper has a specific gravity of about 9, versus steel of about 7.7, but zinc is about 20% lighter than steel and comprises about 30% of most brass, so a brass barrel might weigh just a bit more than one of all steel. I actually am toying with the idea of a shorts-only 10/22 with a full-length bird's eye or curly (fiddleback) maple stock.

TBR

Last edited by TEDDY BEAR RAT; 03-12-2014 at 01:55 PM.
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  #65  
Old 02-12-2013, 01:33 AM
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Chris, I do not have a camera so I can not take pictures of the dual rail...
Good ideas for building 10/22 receivers have always been ignored here on RFC...
A different approach to massive 'dropsinking milling' to clear out the body was invented by VQ in their Superlite receiver.
Its a 2 piece receiver, front is solid block screwed on to the back which is a empty "tin can"... All inletting is done then the 2 pieces are screwed together and outside is machined cutting the head of screws to near invisible...
I have not seen a VQ Superlite is about 12 years so Im not a good info source...
But the best info source is getting someone local to let you examine either a old dual rail or old VQ Superlight receiver... Pictures and measurements than taken... Best to post your state and town address here on RFC and meet up with someone local... It would be best to combine the dual rail design and the 2 part receiver into one... A hobbiest could do it on a chinese mill drill machine...
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Last edited by CPC; 02-12-2013 at 01:54 AM.
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  #66  
Old 02-12-2013, 09:22 AM
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I don't know about the VQ Superlite receivers, but my stainless steel VQ is machined from one piece, although the scope base is screwed on. The scope bases were integral on the older VQ receivers. I do have a good set of drawings now, but visualizing what a dual rail looks like from the drawings would be difficult for most, I think. It would be better to just look at an older stripped Ruger receiver.

My plan is to drill out as much of the material in the receiver as possible, then use end mills for the balance. BTW, my young friend is coming over this Thursday to start the process. Pics to follow.

TBR

Last edited by TEDDY BEAR RAT; 02-12-2013 at 09:24 AM.
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  #67  
Old 02-12-2013, 10:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CPC View Post
Chris, I do not have a camera so I can not take pictures of the dual rail....
Here you go Randy, not the best pic's but hope it helps...This is a 1968 receiver. Chris, if you want to go this route LMK and I'll get you better pic's and measurements

Dad







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  #68  
Old 02-12-2013, 04:33 PM
Chris84
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Thanks, I'd wouldn't mind more pics, but got the general idea of it. I'll measure the bolts I have to get the dimensions.
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  #69  
Old 02-13-2013, 12:48 AM
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dads_... Those are nice pictures... Where the screwdriver is pointed on bottom photo is a round 'cradle' for the guide rod spring assembly created by a small ball mill... I do not know if the cradle is required but by not having a sharp edge it made the receiver stronger... I seen cracked Ruger receivers but never a cracked dual rail one... When Ruger receivers crack its always on that side, crack goes up thru the serial number and will go into the 2nd scope tapped hole on top...
Memory came back alittle today... On the VQ Superlite 2 piece receiver the 2 screws came up thru the bottom and held the 2 leg magazine holder block... I can not remember if the front mounting protrusion that holds the #12-24 tapped hole for stock mounting was on part A or B?... The large 11/16" dia hole was part of the main body... I sort of remember a key cut across internally to strengthen the 2 parts...
With the front being 2 pieces the length of end mills required to inlet is reduced...
I threaded the Superlite's 11/16" dia hole to a common 3/4"-16 tap which - if making a new receiver - threading would eliminate 2 tapped holes for v-block and the 2 front angle cuts for the v-block... In a new receiver threading a smaller hole like 11/16"-16 would be smarter and leave the front block stronger... On some aftermarket threaded receivers the front protrusion for v-block is cut flat eliminating the .920" dia barrel cut also... I would 100% inlet and than cut the outside to finish size...
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Last edited by CPC; 03-04-2013 at 10:49 AM.
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  #70  
Old 02-14-2013, 09:47 PM
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Just seeing this for the first time...I can't wait to see this come to life!!
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  #71  
Old 02-15-2013, 08:35 AM
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I JUST COPIED THIS FROM THE NEWER THREAD

My young friend (we will can him John) came over this evening, and we started the fabrication process. First, I had him measure a receiver and look at the drawings to determine what length to rough cut the work piece. He initially thought just a line in about the right place was sufficient, but we discussed the measure-twice-and-cut-once concept, and the importance of leaving enough material to true up the piece within .001". I then scribed two Sharpie lines and told him he needed to keep the hacksaw blade kerf within the two lines. I showed him how to orient his forearm along the same plane as the desired cut, and to cut 20 strokes, check, correct, and cut 20 more strokes correcting each time until through the piece. He tended to cut to the right on the near side of the piece and to the left on the far side. He trued his stance and used his left hand to correct, finishing pretty close to the mark. I stressed that precise hand sawing is a very important skill to master.



Sorry for the poor photo:


We set the piece in the mill vise and cleaned up and trued the hand-cut end:


This is where he had a bit of trouble understanding. I tried to explain how to make the piece exactly 7.00" long by finding the edge of the piece (edge finders still puzzle him) and moving across 7.00" plus the diameter of the end mill. Some of the confusion stemmed from my use of "thousandths" and his not reading the decimal places correctly. Since we had to find the edge a number of times, he finally got the hang of it...for now. I'm guessing he'll still have trouble during our next session. Without moving the work piece, we cut it to exactly 7.000" and then started milling the front receiver extension. The extension needs to be .550" thick from the bottom of the work piece (the magazine plate will be added later), and getting a micrometer in there was a challenge. We scribed another line about .100" above the target depth and milled away the material. Once we got to within .010" of the target thickness, we came in and cut .005" at a time. He seemed very pleased when we made the final cut and the piece measured exactly .550" (reading the micrometer also proved difficult, but he'll learn) and the length was also dead on plus .005":


Setting the piece up vertically to cut the clearance trough in the extension, I showed him how to use a dial indicator to true it. He seemed to grasp the importance of that part quite well, and quickly realized that set-up time often takes longer than cutting time:


Finding the edge again, he figured out on his own how to find the dead center of the piece. We used a 1" end mill to cut the trough, about .100" from the top and down on each cut and .195" deep until we were .005" from the face of the receiver (we had left the receiver face .005 long so we could clean it up at the same time we finished the relief trough). As expected, when machining way out away from the mill vise support, as we cut the final .005" (.200" total trough depth) for the full length of the extension, we got just a bit of chatter. Then we cleaned up the last .005" off the receiver face and stopped for the night. The session took about 2 1/2 hours. We left the receiver in the mill for the next session:



Next session we will drill the barrel shank hole to a reasonable depth, cut a .040" countersink, and drill and tap the V-block screw holes without moving the work piece. Then, we'll drill and tap the stock bolt hole in the receiver extension, and drill the trigger assembly mounting holes and the bolt buffer hole before hogging out the interior of the receiver.

By the way, we're leaving enough material on the top of the receiver to allow for cutting integral scope bases, probably for Talley rings. In case anyone is wondering, I was going to make my receiver simultaneously but decided to finish his first, since he seems anxious to make progress.

I'll be out of town for about a week, so the next session and installment will have to wait until then.

Thanks for your interest.

Teddy Bear Rat
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  #72  
Old 02-15-2013, 08:52 AM
dufferDave
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While you're at it....

Quote:
Originally Posted by TEDDY BEAR RAT View Post
By the way, we're leaving enough material on the top of the receiver to allow for cutting integral scope bases, probably for Talley rings.
I don't know if you thought of this, or if you even want to, but if you are starting from scratch like this and leaving a little extra meat here and there, you might want to leave a pad at the rear edge of the receiver to add an aft anchor bolt?

You seem to be taking this other guy through machine-shop school, teaching micrometers, set-up, and even hand tool techniques. I commend you for this, for having the patience and showing the kindness to teach someone. I know this sort of thing can be trying at times because I have taught a few classes in a different hobby.

And thanks for taking the time to photograph and describe all these steps, your documentation is extremely helpful and valuable to many of us. Show us some more of that beautiful craftsmanship!
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  #73  
Old 02-15-2013, 09:18 AM
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Thanks, it's my pleasure. Since John wants to use an after-market stock, his receiver will not have a tang. When I build mine, I plan to create an elegant tang about 2" long.

Thanks again,

TBR
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  #74  
Old 02-15-2013, 09:29 AM
azguy
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Awesome stuff TBR. Little confused on the following statement:

"I tried to explain how to make the piece exactly 7.00" long by finding the edge of the piece (edge finders still puzzle him) and moving across 7.00" plus the diameter of the end mill."

With the "wobbler" type edge finder I use in my milling work, you find the "edge" and that gives you the center of the spindle in relationship to that edge, minus the width of the edge finder itself. So move .100 (1/2 the edge finder width) toward the piece and that places the center of the spindle at the true edge, or your zero (datum) point. Then you would move the 7" but only add 1/2 the diameter of the end mill. This puts the cutting edge of the end mill at exactly the 7" point. Am I seeing this wrong or are you using a different edge finder? Not trying to nitpik sir. Just like to understand what I read and learn.

Awesome project TBR. Did the prints match up with a receiver ok or were there any major discrepancies? Thanks for sharing and your young friend should be VERY appreciative of you giving of your time and experience. A good job shop machinist can find a job anytime. And you can take a job shop machinist and make him a CNC operator MUCH easier than the other way around. Really good compensation in the field also. Wish more kids had the kind of opportunity this young man is getting. Need to put the "teach" back in teaching. GREAT job TBR, all the way around.
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  #75  
Old 02-15-2013, 09:44 AM
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We're doing the same thing, I just omitted a few steps. I see now that it could be confusing. After we trued the hand-cut end, we actually didn't need to find the edge, since we just created it. Moving across the piece 7.000" from the end of the cut, then adding the diameter of the cutting tool was the quickest way to get there. After that, we actually used an edge finder a number of other times. I use a battery-operated edge finder that lights up when it touches the edge; it operates without the spindle rotating. Its diameter is .200", so we moved .100" to get the spindle's center line on the edge and moved the appropriate distances, allowing for half the diameter of the next cutting tool.

The drawings are very important and close to the Ruger receiver. I'm also using a milled VQ stainless receiver, which is a bit closer than the Ruger to the drawing dimensions.

Anyway, thanks for keeping me on my toes...man, you guys actually read all this stuff!

TBR

Last edited by TEDDY BEAR RAT; 02-15-2013 at 09:50 AM.
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