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  #1  
Old 12-29-2019, 09:55 PM
outdoorman

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Trespasser/Poacher climbing stand



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I just closed on the purchase my own small hunting acreage and had the borders clearly flagged in a survey.
A couple of days ago, my brother was walking the property and he called me to report a white ford pickup truck driving on a section of the powerline that runs through my property. He said the truck was at the top of the powerline.
Today my son and I were there when we found a climbing stand at the base of a pine tree and deer corn scattered on a trail nearby the tree.
My son went on to hunt another area of the property while I decided to hunt on the climbing stand as it looked like a good spot. I pondered what to do about the stand and the poacher who left it.
As late afternoon set in, my son texts me to let me know he sees a white pickup truck in the distance at the top of the hilly section of the powerline.
So I climb down, walk up the powerline and see the truck some few hundred yards away on the top of the powerline.
As I walk toward it, climbing up the graded hill side, the truck is stopped before it slowly turns around and drives away.
Although the boundaries are clearly flagged I have not finished posting 'No Tresspassing' signs on the entire perimeter but will do it ASAP.
As the truck drove away, I feel certain it was their treestand and that they knew they were hunting illegally.
I had planned to return to hunt on New Year's Day but now will also do some sign posting and check to see if the climbing stand is still there.
I'd like to hear suggestions on what to do with it and a trespasser?
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  #2  
Old 12-29-2019, 10:28 PM
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If you just bought it, there's a possibility that this trespasser has hunted there before and hasn't figured out that the property is now sold to someone else. I'd give them a chance to butt out before confrontation. Definitely finish your signage, and you might even put a note in the tree stand stating the situation. If they keep coming back after that, call the game warden, all you can do. Trespassers are difficult to stop, especially if there is any public ground bordering your property. I hate calling the authorities onto someone, but sometimes it's a must.
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Old 12-29-2019, 10:34 PM
tfrank
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A number of things to keep in mind...

A number of things to keep in mind...
1. the owner of that white pick-up may have permission from the previous owner, and so should know the previous owners name if that is the case, and then again they may not have permission. You just bought the land from that previous owner so I am willing to bet that you know his name. You could also ask the person you just bought the land from if he had given anyone permission to hunt on that property.
2. Try to get the license plate number and a decent picture of the truck and contact the game warden, and let the game warden handle this. You most certainly don't want to get into any kind of violent confrontation.
3. That tree stand is on your property, so as far as I would be concerned I would consider it mine, and take it home. leave a note that it was turned into the game warden, and the game warden would like to have a conversation with the owner.
4. You could use your own climber and put a trail camera 20 or so feet up in a tree where it can get a good picture of anyone coming in to retrieve the tree stand that was left on your property. Make sure it"s equipped with the "NO GLOW" lights.
Good luck with resolving this issue. You know it could be an honest mistake... I really don't think so but one can always hope for the best.
God Bless, Frank.
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Old 12-29-2019, 11:19 PM
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Great ideas from tfrank.

Id call local game officials and local sheriff to ask what options you have. Where I live, I can take the stand and leave my contact information. Id also make sure your property is posted. If using game cameras, Id prob start with cheap ones before I put high dollar cams out. Id try to get a cam facing the road that the white truck drove in on as well as on the tree they set up on. You may ask the game warden what he needs to issue a trespassing ticket so you can be prepared if things escalate to that.
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Old 12-30-2019, 12:06 AM
RGSIII
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I would definitely get the game warden and LEO involved. I don't know Georgia law, in Alabama, if you shot something over their corn, you will be illegally baiting (if you don't have the appropriate permit).

I have thrown trespassers off before, getting officials involved will make a bigger impression on these people. Not knowing these people, they could do damage or harm to you and your property.

I would remove the stand after the authorities saw it.
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Old 12-30-2019, 12:24 AM
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My Grandfather used to just visit with them, exchange contact info, and arrange a few days per season for them to hunt. But it sounds like your guys might be a little shifty....
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Old 12-30-2019, 02:46 AM
fourbore
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Pretty ugly post. A guy buys a hunting cabin and posts the property! Where would be if every land owner posted all his property? Does not even have the signs up yet and all in huff.
I keep my land open, I am not just blowing hot air.
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Old 12-30-2019, 04:04 AM
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In Alabama, ALL land is posted by law. You're supposed to have written permission on you to be legal. I don't know how strongly it's enforced, but it's the law for sure. I hunt on family and friends property without bothering, but then it's only a few minutes walk to their homes, so if the game warden did happen to show up, it would be quickly resolved.
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Old 12-30-2019, 07:40 AM
dotchief
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Check

your game laws on property identification. In Missouri, you can use purple paint on the trees/fence post to indicate the land is posted = no trespassing. Works excellent because you can't take the trees like you can signage.

FWIW - I would leave a note on the climbing stand indicating that the land is sold and you're new owner. You have no idea how long this person has hunted this land.

Pat G
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Old 12-30-2019, 08:11 AM
NoSecondBest
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I had the same problem about thirty years ago. I got 165 acres of land that had never been posted in the past and I found a lot of people showing up to hunt. I don't blame them for it, they'd hunted there for years and knew the previous owner. I let them hunt the day they were "caught" because some of them drove a long ways to get there and didn't know. Later on, I'd find evidence of people hunting there long after it was posted and they just ignored the signs. I had the game wardens and state police contact these people and give them a warning on my behalf (it was my choice whether or not to write them up the first time.....I didn't want my camp vandalized so I opted for the warning....it worked). If I were you, I'd put a note on the guys stand and also put a camera up. I'd put the camera up to get his license plate number, you already know he's trespassing, but without his plate number you don't know who he is. Even today, some thirty plus years later I still get trespassers. It's all part of owning property and you just have to learn how best to deal with it. I can tell you that trail cameras do work as I've caught ATV riders and trespassers sneaking on to my place. As time goes on and the word gets out it will almost come to a complete stop......almost. I'd suggest you try to resolve it peacefully the first year just so you don't get your own stuff vandalized. Most will soon realize that they have to go somewhere else to hunt. Final thought: what if you were someone who hunted there for years and didn't know you couldn't be there anymore? Just consider that it might not be a nefarious act, just a mistake on their part.
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Old 12-30-2019, 08:33 AM
MissedEm
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Several years ago I had permission to hunt squirrels on a 20 acre tract. One dayI got a cal from a friend asking if it was my truck parked there. Turned out the owner sold the tract and failed to let me know -the new owner was going to call the sheriff but asked my friend first. Give the benefit of the dough first, no need for an ugly confrontation.
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Old 12-30-2019, 09:12 AM
GTS225
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I might suggest you check into right-of-way rights, as well. I don't know the laws, but if the power company holds right-of-way rights, and it's an employee of the power company, then you might not have a legal challenge. He would, however have to get written permission to access it from you, if crossing your property.

The laws sometimes work in strange ways.

Roger
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Old 12-30-2019, 09:56 AM
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Some good advice here, but the best is to arrange to meet with your local game warden and discuss the matter with him. He knows the laws and what is commonly accepted behavior in the area. By doing so, you will not only get valuable information you will also get to know someone that will be important to know in the future AND put him or her on notice that there is a potential issue with someone coming on the property.
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Old 12-30-2019, 10:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GTS225 View Post
I might suggest you check into right-of-way rights, as well. I don't know the laws, but if the power company holds right-of-way rights, and it's an employee of the power company, then you might not have a legal challenge. He would, however have to get written permission to access it from you, if crossing your property.

The laws sometimes work in strange ways.

Roger
I don't know about the right of way laws in Iowa nor Georgia but I think they might be similar everywhere as some power companies have lines in multiple states. In NC the power company has a right of way for their lines and for upkeep and maintenance on the lines and right of way. Their employees have no authority to be on the property unless it is company business related. We had a similar issue on some property in the 80s that had a large transmission line through it and people were accustomed to riding ATV, horses and hunting there. After we leased it we fenced the right of way at the property lines and installed gates, notified the power company and they came out and put one of their locks on the gates, interlocked with our lock so we both had access. No more problems after that. It is surprising though, how many people think the power company owns all the land their lines are on.
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Old 12-30-2019, 12:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fourbore View Post
Pretty ugly post. A guy buys a hunting cabin and posts the property! Where would be if every land owner posted all his property? Does not even have the signs up yet and all in huff.
I keep my land open, I am not just blowing hot air.
I think past experiences will enter into an individual's take on the situation. Having seen fences cut, chained gates destroyed, property stolen/vandalized, and garbage dumped, my feelings are pretty fixed when it comes to trespassers.

This is a brief article on trespassing in Georgia. I can not vouch for its accuracy.

https://www.gon.com/hunting/dealing-with-trespassers
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