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Old 11-23-2016, 04:58 PM
Marc780

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The ATI/G.S.G. STG44 RIFLE: FIELD STRIP/DISASSEMBLY, MAGS, OPTICS, PARTS, & ETC!



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I bought this interesting rifle for a fun plinker in September 2016, and it cost me $370 from Big 5 Sporting goods. Having been a self-admitted war buff since the 1970's, no history of World War 2 is complete without some mention of this iconic rifle. In the sheer genius and innovation embodied by this rifle, it symbolizes the astounding resourcefulness and sheer folly of the final years of the third Reich. I like to familiarize myself with my brand new guns, so I looked darn near everywhere for more information about it. But after not finding very much information online, I set about gathering resources and information myself, and made this thread as a resource for useful information about the rifle for my fellow STG 44 owners.

If you have a tip. hint, photo or idea about this rifle and want to share please add to this post too.

The rifle is manufactured by German Sport Guns in Germany. It is chambered in .22 LR, and GSG advises to shoot only high velocity ammunition. The gun was introduced in the USA at the 2012 Shot Show, at the price of $600. But thankfully for Sturmgewehr fans, the rifles have dropped in price and you can buy one today, in late 2016 for around $300. For a gun of this quality, that price makes it a positive steal, and it is a worthwhile gun to own for many shooters. The rifle is well crafted, reliable, and accurate, and it is a faithful copy of the original German Sturmgewehr from 1944. But the rather substantial price drop of late, may indicate this rifle will not be in production forever; and so it may be worthwhile to pick one up sooner not later.

ORIGINAL PRODUCTION Sturmgewehr MP44 Vs. GSG STG44


THE STURMGEWEHR CONCEPT

The MP44 was created during World War 2 by a design team led by German small arms geniuses Hugo Schmeisser and Frederick Vollmer. (Both these men later wound up working for the Soviets after the war, and it is even rumored that Vollmer worked on developing the AK-47). The MP44 was a revolutionary rifle in several ways. It introduced onto the battlefield for the first time, the concept of a mid-power rifle round fired from a selective-fire rifle. Previous attempts at such a weapon had used rifles firing only full size rounds, but the results were invariably the same: a heavy and bulky rifle, that when fired on full-auto recoiled far too forcefully to be effective in the hands of the average soldier.

The Sturmgewehr was designed to use a brand-new cartridge, that was a modification of the standard German 7.92 x 57 rifle round. The new bullet was manufactured by necking down and trimming the standard rifle case, and the use of a lighter and shorter bullet. The result was the 7.92 x 33 Kurtz (short) round. The Kurtz round was designed to be effective up to about 400 meters; this was determined by German research as the maximum range that the average soldier could be expected to consistently hit a target on the battlefield, anyway. The new round used less brass, powder and lead then the full sized rifle round and made for a lighter combat load for the soldier. More important, the full-auto capability of the Sturmgewehr was a tremendous force multiplier on the battlefield, particularly on the Eastern front, where the Germans were almost always outnumbered by the Red Army. The average German soldier could now deliver heavy and accurate full-auto fire at ranges up out to 200 meters - far beyond the range of of the Soviet PPSH submachine guns used by their enemies. German troops armed with the Sturmgewehr very often had a dramatic effect on the battlefield wherever it appeared. Unfortunately for the Germans, the 7.92 Kurtz ammo was always in critically short supply as was the rifle itself, and the Germans never had enough of them.

The "assault rifle" effectively filled the small arms gap between short range, open-bolt, pistol caliber submachine guns, and the long-range, but slow firing bolt action rifle. It was intended by the German Waffenamt (Army weapons office) that the Sturmgewehr would eventually replace the KAR98 bolt-action rifle, the Karabiner 43 semi automatic rifle, and the MP38/40 submachine gun. The MP44 was designed for quick mass production using a minimum of complicated machine tooling, so it was manufactured primarily of steel stampings with the number of machined parts including the barrel and bolt being kept to a bare minimum. As early as 1942 early prototypes and variants of the weapon had already been tested, perfected, and even used on the battlefield in small numbers (notably at the battle for the "Demyansk Pocket" in Russia in early 1943 where around 3,000 of the rifles and their ammunition, were air-dropped to desperate German troops facing encirclement by the Red Army). Designers from many German companies had contributed their own prototypes to the Sturmgewehr competition including Erma, Walther, Haenel, Steyr, Mauser and Sauer with the Haenel design ultimately being chosen for mass production. However the Führer did not approve mass production of the Sturmgewehr until 1944 - too late to change the fortunes of war for Germany. About 450,000 Sturmgwehrs were made by war's end.

The G.S.G. (GERMAN SPORT GUNS) STG 44 DESIGN AND FABRICATION

The construction of the GSG copy is quite different from the original. Steel stampings are used to fabricate the hand guard, stock adapter and upper receiver. The receiver is a metal casting, made of an alloy known as "Zamac". (Zamac is a zinc-based metal alloyed with aluminum, magnesium and copper.) Method of operation is also very different: the war-time Sturmgewehr is gas-operated; upon firing, the gases are routed through a gas tube to act on a gas piston to force the bolt back; this ejects the round and cocks the hammer for the next shot. By contrast the GSG rifle uses a simple blow-back design, the recoil of firing the bullet moves the bolt backwards in its rails. The bolt strikes the hammer to recock it, while the empty case strikes the ejector to be flung from the rifle, the bolt returns to strip a new round from the magazine and chambers it to fire again. The GSG rifle, like the original, has a spring-loaded dust cover over the ejection port. The port should open when the bolt moves to the rear, whether if by hand or by action of firing.

The magazines are plastic and are available in 25 or 10 round capacity.

Magazine disassembly procedure can be found in the accompanying post, below this one on this page.

The factory finish on the GSG rifle is a combination of bluing and paint. The stamped forearm, the stock extension and most of the other stampings are blued and the rest is painted. The first production Sturmgewehrs had a blued finish, but this changed later depending on the deteriorating German war situation at the time. The rifles that came along later were phosphate finished, and some very late war production guns were even left "in the white" (bare metal), some guns apparently having been produced in such haste they even wore parts finished using all three.

SAFE HANDLING OF THE RIFLE

The owner's manual provided with the rifle describes operation, loading, firing and safety procedures in detail. The rifle generally functions reliably, and most misfires or jams are caused by improper loading of the magazine or other ammo related problems. Notice on this rifle, there is no loaded-chamber indicator nor is there a magazine safety. So any time there is a live round in the chamber, the gun can and will fire - whether a magazine is in place or not. Never chamber a live round until you are ready to shoot.

Always pull the bolt handle back and visually check the chamber for a live round immediately upon picking up the rifle! When the rifle is loaded, always place the safety lever on "SAFE" (Switch pushed DOWN, it will look about the 5 o' clock position) until you are ready to fire. Always keep the muzzle pointed in the safest direction.

"ALL GUNS ARE ALWAYS LOADED."

TOOLS

The rifle is designed to be field-stripped without any special tools except a cleaning rod or Bore Snake, patches, brushes and solvent/CLP. In normal use no other special tools or supplies are needed. Even so, the addition of a few tools will make advanced disassembly of the rifle much easier, should the owner need to do that, in case the gun becomes very dirty or the need arises for changing broken parts.

• 1.5mm and 3mm Hex wrench (for removing the cocking handle screw, lower receiver cover, and the assembling bolt respectively)
• T6, T8, T9 and T15 Torx screwdrivers (if disassembling the magazines or lower receiver)
• Slotted screwdrivers (if disassembling the magazine)
• Old toothbrush (for scrubbing the bolt face and inside the receiver)

FIELD STRIP-DISASSEMBLY



For easy reference a number preceding a part name, indicates its number in the GSG factory exploded view and parts list, at the end of this post.

1. Remove the magazine. Pull back on the cocking handle and visually check the chamber for a round, eject if one is present

2. A pin (#114, "take-down pin") holds the butt stock to the trigger group. This pin is hollow and has a u-shaped piece of bent wire on one end, the wire is spring loaded to keep the pin from falling out. Push in on the end with the spring and pull out the pin from the other side. The end of the wire is sharp so use care if pressing it in by hand. Pliers can be used if needed to press the spring down far enough to pull out the pin.


3. Pull the stock from the receiver. With the stock removed, the trigger group is now free to pivot down. (The trigger group holds in the spring holder, so use care it doesn't swing down out of place when you don't want it to.) Pivot the trigger group down and the bolt parts can now be removed.

4. Pull out and remove part #111, "spring holder" (also called the "end cap").

5. Now tilt the rifle muzzle up and pull the cocking handle to the rear. Pull out #109, "cocking tube spring". Reach under the receiver and into the square opening and slide the bolt group rearwards far enough so you can reach in and pull it out. Remove #113 "bolt buffer" and the bolt group. Please take note of how the parts fit since it is possible to reassemble them wrong later. (In the factory drawing, the part with the bolt and rails is called the "Verschluss" -"Closure" in German...I'll refer to it as the "bolt group" for clarity.) Anyway, an unusual feature of the verschluss is it fits inside the receiver in stamped grooves tilted at about a 30 degree angle. Note the orientation of the bolt buffer as you remove it - when re-installing this part, it goes behind the bolt group in the lower tube of the receiver. The bell shaped end of the bolt buffer - faces to the rear and installs with the tab facing up.

The design of the bolt group or is very similar to an AR15 .22 LR adapter kit. To clean this I spray off the bolt parts with brake cleaner and scrub with an old toothbrush, especially on the face of the bolt and extractor, and that seems to get all the parts plenty clean enough.

It is not necessary to remove the trigger group ( GSG calls this the "Griffstuck" which means "handle", but I'll refer to it as the trigger group). However cleaning the bore is easier if you do remove it. A hollow threaded pin (#107 "assembling bolt") holds the trigger group in place in front; a 3 mm metric hex wrench removes this pin.


5. You may want to remove the cocking handle and cocking tube for cleaning at this point. It is possible, and maybe even preferable to clean inside the receiver without removing these parts - just hosing out the inside with brake cleaner, and a good scrubbing of the breech face and extractor slot in the barrel, is often sufficient. But for a thorough cleaning I remove these parts every so often. Red arrows show cocking handle and cocking handle screw (parts #47 and 48).

The cocking handle is held into the cocking tube by a #48 "cocking lever screw". To access the screw, turn the receiver over, pull the cocking handle to the rear, and locate the screw head at the base of the cocking handle. Use the 1.5 mm hex wrench to unscrew and completely remove the screw. The cocking handle will now come out. (In the image - the silver grease on the screw is anti-seize compound. I used it to "glue" the screw onto the wrench while reinstalling.)

A thoughtful detail that GSG copies from the real thing, is the hole drilled in the rear of the butt stock. This hole is covered by a spring loaded metal plate called #78 "top butt plate". On the wartime MP44's, in this hole the factory added a small instruction manual, a spare firing pin and an extractor. On the GSG rifle this hole comes empty though. But I just use this hole to store the hex wrenches.


Now slide the plastic cocking tube out of the gun too.


6. A stamped steel forearm (part #108) covers the underside of the barrel. This part is a press-fit. Pull down on it and pry gently under the forearm to remove it.


7. For normal cleaning this is as far as you normally need to go. But if your rifle has gotten very dirty, or you need to change a broken part, here are some steps showing how the rifle comes apart in more detail.

The trigger group is a two-piece metal casting. It's held together by torx screws, size T15. Remove the handgrip screws, then unscrew and remove the remaining screws, and separate the trigger group halves.


8. To disassemble the lower receiver halves, first use a torx screw driver (size T9) to remove the (#55) magazine button screw in the center of the magazine release button (lower arrow). Remove (#54) magazine release button, the spring, and (#68) Magazine catch and set them aside. Then using a 3 mm hex wrench, unscrew and remove the two hex screws (shown by the arrows).

The left side of the receiver can now be pulled off its matching half, exposing the barrel mounting screws (2 X T9 screws). I check these screws for tightness every time I have the receiver cover off.

9. I use grease - TW25b, lubriplate, or even auto chassis grease are acceptable - on the bolt rails and on the underside of the bolt where it contacts the hammer. The wear marks on the bolt rails show you where the grease should go. The coil springs in the trigger group, and the action springs for the bolt and cocking handle, get several drops of Breakfree; and i put one drop on each pin in the lower receiver.

If it's cold out, or you'd rather not use any grease, it's a simple matter to remove the butt stock, slide out the bolt assembly and apply several drops of Mobil 1 or other oil to the bolt rails and spring. Sometimes I'll do this right before I go to the range anyway.

CLEANING THE BORE AND CHAMBER

9. Cleaning the bore is less awkward if the trigger group is removed. To clean the bore after firing, first I take a bore mop or patch and soak it with Hoppe's or Kroil and run it through the bore, from the chamber end. I follow the bore mop with a nylon brush, making several passes through the bore to loosen the fouling, followed by a dry patch. If the dry patch comes out dirty, repeat the steps again. When the dry patch comes out clean enough I push a patch or bore mop soaked with Eezox through the bore to protect it from corrosion while the rifle is stored.

CLEANING AND LUBING

If you live in an area where the climate makes your guns prone to rust, most of the anti-corrosion work can probably be covered by a good coating with Eezox of the parts. Use a toothbrush and q-tips to scrub the face of the breech (inside end of the barrel where the bullets go into), the extractor slot in this area, and the feed ramp since this area gets particularly dirty during firing. The bolt face and extractor slot are places to keep clean as new, a build-up of fouling here can cause the rifle to jam if ignored too long.

SUGGESTED LUBRICATION

Coil springs, assembly pins, hammer and trigger pivot pins; dust cover hinge, spring, and catch pin: Break Free CLP, Mobil 1 automotive oil, or other good gun oil
Bolt rails, hammer contact surface, screw threads, and bolt contact points; bolt group rail contact points inside the upper receiver.: grease such as TW25B , Lubriplate, Mobil 1 synthetic grease, or Superlube synthetic grease (in cold weather, replace with Mobil 1)
Magazine spring and follower: molybdenum powder
Bore, Inside of receiver and stock adapter (where it meets the receiver): Eezox

REASSEMBLY

1. Once your rifle is ready to be put back together, the first step is to reinstall the cocking tube and cocking handle if you removed them. (I didn't use Loctite on this screw...because if I did it might make it next to impossible to remove the screw again.)

2. Now reinstall the trigger group ("Griffstuck") and the assembling bolt and screw if you removed it.

3. Slide the bolt group inside the receiver. The bolt group fits into the rails stamped into the upper receiver - and it is supposed to be at that odd 30 degree angle as installed.

4. Now install the bolt buffer. This part goes in right behind the bolt, with the squared notch to the rear and facing up.

5. Install the cocking spring. This spring fits over the end of the spring tube so wiggle it into place now

6. Install the spring holder (also called the "end cap"). The "cocking tube spring guide" attached to it fits over the cocking spring. Press the spring holder into the rear of the receiver and hold it there.

7. Pivot up the trigger group to capture the parts in place. Reinstall the butt stock and insert the pin.

DECOCKING THE HAMMER

If the gun is cocked, but the rifle is not fired, it is recommended that the hammer be decocked to remove the spring tension before placing the gun in storage. Dry firing is not recommended because it can break the firing pin, when it slams into the face of the breech. So the hammer should be dropped some other way. GSG says to use the procedure below:

There is another way to do this too. First remove the magazine, then check the chamber for a live round and eject it if one is present. Then pull back on the cocking handle, in such a way that the bolt has a small gap (between the breech face and the bolt face) of about one half inch from fully closed. Then pull the trigger to release the hammer. (By pulling open the bolt before pulling the trigger, the firing pin cannot strike the breech face.) Now allow the bolt to go forward, and close the dust cover.

https://www.americantactical.us/category/Rifle%20Main

Below are the exploded view and parts list from GSG to use when ordering parts.



Parts 1 thru 32

Parts 33-63

Parts 64-95

Parts 96-End

Last edited by Marc780; 02-12-2017 at 06:43 PM.
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  #2  
Old 11-24-2016, 12:20 AM
Marc780

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The GSG STG-44 THREAD - SIGHTS, OPTICS AND MOUNTS

There are several accessories you might want to have for this rifle - an optic, a sling, spare magazines and replica mag pouches are all widely available. The rifle is accurate enough to make mounting an optic worthwhile. While the iron sites are adequate for outdoor shooting, in the mediocre lighting present in most indoor shooting ranges the iron sights are barely visible. To compound the problem, on most of these rifles, the iron sights are "off" and actually make the rifle shoot too low at close range - even with the rear sight adjusted all the way. But if you intend to use the iron sights exclusively, there are a couple of simple ways to fix the defects in the sights, and these are examined in another post further down on this page.

Once I fired the rifle, I (reluctantly) realized I would have to use an optic most of the time. I would have preferred to just use the iron sights without an optic; adding one spoils the lines of the rifle, and the scope mount is just one more thing to remove before cleaning the gun. But I already wear glasses because of my aging eyes, and the factory sights on this rifle are already hard to see, especially in dim light, so, the only question was which mount and scope combo it would be.

Since I more or less had to use a scope sight, which of course requires a mount, I wanted a mount/optic combo that looked reasonably close to the original German issue parts, without breaking the bank just for a little old rimfire fun gun. And this was not as easy to find as you might think.

Below is shown a German war-era MP44, modified by the Waffenamt with a hastily-added scope mount. The mount is a simple metal bar, spot-welded to the upper receiver.

A few of the original Sturmgewehrs, no one really knows how many, were fitted with an optic at the request of some German ordnance officer or the other. The designers probably never anticipated that a scope might be fitted, so a number of the rifles had to be hurriedly modified as above, to make this possible. Most commonly the ZF4 scope was pressed into service as this was the most widely issued German optic of the war. Some Sturmgewehrs were even fitted with the very advanced "Vampir" infrared night vision optic. Unfortunately, little information remains about how many, if any of the MP44's thus fitted were ever used on the battlefield. Ultimately, it was decided by the Germans that the modest accuracy potential of the Sturmgewehr simply did not justify the expense and time needed for adding an optic, and the whole project was quietly dropped.


Genuine and replica German scopes and scope mounts as shown in the image are still available for a price. However it would not be an easy thing to attach this type of scope mount to the GSG rifle. An ersatz copy-cat type mount and optic is probably close enough for most shooters like me.

The GSG rifle comes with a scope mount from the factory. To install it you unbolt the iron sights and bolt on the scope mount as a replacement. The factory mount might be okay for a red dot sight but for any other optic it mounts way too far forward to be practical. The image shows the rifle with the factory scope mount and aftermarket scope; note the very long eye relief from the optic

i settled on a "UTG MP5 Steel Claw Mount with STANAG to Picatinny Adaptor G5" mount.

This mount clamps to the rear of the upper receiver. It cost $65. Please know the mount, out of the box, is probably going to scratch up your receiver at the clamping points. But I'm thinking of refinishing the rifle with Durablue in the black (from Brownell's) sometime soon, the scratches might be the excuse I need to do it anyway.

To fit the mount I found the scope shown in the photo above. It is a "Leapers AccuShot 4XT38 Tactical Scope - Stanag mount". I found it on Ebay for $155. Unfortunately this scope is no longer being made, which is a shame as it is a passably close copy to the original ZF4 scope.


A simpler and cheaper kind of mount is the claw mount shown below. I bought the one in the image for mounting my Weaver scope on the rifle, it's just called "Tactical MP5 HK G3 SCOPE MOUNT" and it cost $12. It is not QR but if you like your optic mounted low, this might be the one to get. For this type of mount you will want "high" mounts (as opposed to the low or medium style) or else your optic won't be mounted high enough to see over the front sight block.

Below is the mount with QR high rings and a Weaver V3 scope

At the range I test fired this setup and after a couple of dozen shots, I set about zeroing in at the range's maximum distance of about 40 or 50 meters. The Leapers scope is no target grade optic, nevertheless I quickly got it to make 3 to 4 inch groups with the occasional flier every magazine load. Considering that this gun is designed to be a replica rifle and a fun plinker, the reliability (400 rounds and no jams) and accuracy are unusually good for a gun of this type, and adding a scope makes it even more fun to shoot.

Last edited by Marc780; 01-30-2017 at 12:55 AM.
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Old 12-01-2016, 07:58 PM
Marc780

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Gsg stg-44 magazine disassembly

There are three different magazines made for the GSG rifle. Two are 10 round capacity and one holds 25 for those in the Free States. The long magazine is made in either 10 or 24 rounds, the 10 rounder is blocked by the height of the magazine block and magazine pin to limit its capacity. There is also a short 10 round mag available.

Short 10-round magazine for the STG44.

The only magazines are those manufactured by GSG. They are widely available online and the price range is $28 and up.

The magazines are easy to take apart but not so easy to reassemble. So cleaning the mags is something I limit to a flushing with tried-and-true brake cleaner. Another good reason not to disassemble the mags very often is because they are plastic, including the screw holes. The screw threads will soon strip out if they are used too much.

You will need these tools to disassemble the magazine: 10 or 12 cable ties, one or two medium slotted screwdrivers, 2 X Torx screwdrivers size T6 and T9. Cutters to clip the cable ties.

Replacement mag springs are available. The magazines in the STG44 use the exact same spring as in the GSG 5 and the GSG AK47 magazines. There are two lengths of magazine spring, one for the 10 and one for the 25.
You can get springs here
https://www.hkparts.net/shop/pc/MP5-...Loader-c74.htm



MAGAZINE DISASSEMBLY

The magazines are held together by 10 screws, 8 X T9 Torx screws on the magazine side and floor plate, and two smaller screws, size T6, up top near the feed lips as shown in the image below



With all 10 screws out, the magazine halves may have to be pried apart using a screwdriver or two. The magazines are not glued together as some have stated, or at least mine weren't.


Use care while removing the top-most screws since the mag follower (part #96) WILL fly out like a projectile if it's not contained. Also after removing the floor plate screws set them aside from the others, as the threads are different then the other 6.

ASSEMBLING THE MAGAZINE

1. Reassembling the magazines is much less easy then taking them apart. The problem is that the spring will squirm its way out of its track as soon as you compress it. It seems impossible to put it all back together at first, but it really isn't, they assembled them at the factory somehow after all. So after some thought, I found a way that worked: I use a whole bunch of plastic cable ties to keep the spring from twisting out. Now I realize this is a cumbersome and complicated way to do this with all the cable ties and there's probably another way to do it. And if somebody knows a better way I'd sure like to know! But this method actually worked so I am passing it on. Since wrestling the snake-like spring into the magazine and keeping it there is a clumsy process at best, however you do it.

The zip ties keep the spring from popping out of its track yet in such a way that the spring can compress too. So by using the zip ties, you can press the mag follower/thumbpiece down inside the magazine far enough to capture all the parts.

2. To start assembling the magazine, place the spring into its track on part #98, "magazine body left". Slide it over the tab on part #100 "magazine spacer" - this part should already be pressed onto part #99 magazine pin (image below)

(There are different holes in #98 this pin can be pressed into, depending on which spring you are allowed to use in your state. The highest or second highest is for the 10 rounder and the very bottom hole is where the pin goes for the 25 round mag.)

You will need about 8 or 10 ties. Now wrap a cable tie all the way around the outside of #98 "mag body left" and pull it tight over the magazine half and spring. Go up a bit and pull on another cable tie, you will need one every inch or two. Keep adding cable ties until you are about an inch or two below the feed lip and these should be enough to secure the spring for the next step, pushing in the magazine follower into the magazine and capturing the parts with the other magazine half.

2. Next pick up part #94 "mag body right", (the mag follower and thumbpiece, part #95, go in this half). Place the magazine follower on the pin of #95, "magazine thumbpiece" - the follower is a press fit so hold it in place for now. Bring the two magazine halves together and place the mag follower into the end of the magazine spring, (in the left magazine half). Work the follower and spring down inside the magazine halves - to do that, seperate the mag body just barely enough to slide the spring + magazine follower all the way down inside the magazine. (The idea is to hold the spring in place in its track, while you press the magazine follower down inside the magazine and under the feed lips.)

The zip ties hold the spring in its track, allowing you to assemble the right half onto the left and install the screws.

3. Continue to hold the magazine halves together as it would not be pleasant if everything flew apart right now. Put in the lowest pair of magazine side screws but do not tighten them all the way. It's time to remove the zip ties now, so cut the bottom most zip ties and pull them out of the mag body. Now screw in the next pair of magazine screws. Cut the cable ties here, repeat until all the ties are out and the screws are all in but not tight. Install the two small T6 size screws (the ones by the feed lips) loosely now too. If everything went right, the spring. the magazine follower and the thumbpiece are still in place.

4. With the mag almost fully assembled, try to move the thumbpiece up and down. The mag follower should have no binding or sticking, and when you release the thumbpiece at any point in its travel the follower ought to slam upwards from spring pressure alone. If that's the case, install the magazine floor plate and its screws now.

6. Now tighten the screws some more, but again, don't try to tighten them all the way yet. As you tighten the mag screws you might find you have a sticky follower so move the magazine thumbpiece every so often as you tighten to make sure it still moves without binding. If it sticks or binds, the magazine might have gone together wrong - it's possible that a spring coil might have got caught between the parts or something like that so, if you can't make the mag function perfectly at this point, the whole thing might need to come apart to do it again.

Ideally the magazine spring and follower should function while clean and dry. If you want to lube them anyway, a dry lubricant like molybdenum powder is probably ideal.

Last edited by Marc780; 12-13-2016 at 08:08 PM.
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Old 12-13-2016, 10:58 AM
Jump62
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STG-44 Oiler

I do like my Stg-44, when going to the .22 only ranges I'm asked is that really a .22. I found this item that fits in the butt stock hole that I think was a German Army standard item with the weapon: https://www.libertytreecollectors.co...&idcategory=51 . It's a Kar-98 oiler that being put in a weapon in 1943/45 would have made sense for supply ease and the manufacturing tooling already on line.
Jump62
aka Paul
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Old 12-13-2016, 07:37 PM
Marc780

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That little bottle is a great idea, perfect shape and about the only thing that'll fit the hole and be useful too, actually. I didn't know they made these, I bought a plastic SKS oiler and just put Mobil 1 in it but of course it doesn't fit in the hole in the stock. I'm going to get one of these and keep some Breakfree inside of it, it'll work for last minute oiling at the range.
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Old 12-21-2016, 02:42 AM
Marc780

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G.s.t.g. 44 rifle - slings, mag pouches, mods, and further reading

There are some accessories available for the STG 44 rifle that the average owner may want to have. While the selection is unfortunately, fairly limited compared to more popular rifles such as the 10/22, there are still plenty of extras enough that you could easily spend what the rifle cost you just on optics and other accessories.

The rifle is a fun plinker and probably lacks the potential to be much more then that. Accurate shots out to 100 yards that keep in a 6 inch group, might be the limit of its capabilities. So any expensive modifications to make the rifle more accurate may have limited results no matter what you do to it.

SLINGS

The first accessory I got was a sling. Even for carrying the rifle a short distance, a sling is nice to have just to keep both hands free. There was nothing special about the original leather sling used on the genuine MP44, as the Germans simply issued the Sturmgewehr with the same sling they used for millions of K98 bolt action rifles.

This sling was a leather strap with diamond crosshatch pattern on one side, that had a leather keeper for adjusting the length, a steel buckle, and a leather stopper with a metal button. You can get a replica leather sling for about $20-30


Instructions for mounting the sling are here

http://bergflak.com/slings3.html


MAGAZINE POUCHES

The German wartime issue pouches were made of canvas with leather straps yo hold the cover shut. They held 3 magazines each, and came by the pair with back and neck straps so the soldier could wear the pouches on the front. As these fellows are doing below.


There are plenty of reproduction pouches available; whether they are practical to use or not is a different matter. AKM pouches will also work since they are about the right size, and you can get them in an individual or double pouch instead of having to haul around a minimum of 3 at all times. The best repros are made of canvas, and cost around $30-$70; some of the cheaper ones are made of Jute (a tough plant fiber similar to burlap). Canvas repro pouches shown below


Rear view of the mag pouches


PROBLEMS AND ISSUES

Problems: The bolt contacts the hammer after every shot to recock it, of course, and because of this the bolt has a mildly annoying issue. After only 300 rounds I found significant galling on the bottom of the bolt. where it hits the hammer. The hammer itself showed no wear, only the bolt looked worn. I used grease on this area before firing it, but even if you ran the rifle dry, on a properly hardened steel part there should be little or no visible wear after so little use. All i can figure is that maybe the bolt did not receive proper heat treating or else the steel they used is just too soft. After designing the rest of the rifle with such painstaking attention to quality, I don't know how GSG could manufacture such a poorly-made part.

I haven't returned the gun for this issue (these rifles have a 2 year warranty) nor do i intend to unless it starts misfiring. Because unless the galling actually caused misfires, I'm inclined to think the factory would not or could not, do much to fix this anyway even if they wanted to. The part's a bit imperfect and that's probably not enough to call for some kind of factory fix. But the galling doesn't affect the operation of the rifle and truthfully, is probably just more of an aesthetic issue. To remove the galling, I polished it out with #180 emery cloth - and that cleaned it up pretty well. The hammer is obviously made of harder metal then the bolt, because the hammer shows no wear whatsoever. After puzzling over this issue, I finally settled on using this brake grease, (image) since I had it around for cars anyway, and it seems to do the job better then anything else. I just apply this grease on the contact points of the bolt and on the hammer, and there is little or no galling after that.


If you need to order parts for the rifle, email the distributor, who is (ATI) and their email is

[email protected]
[email protected]

Last edited by Marc780; 01-26-2017 at 06:09 AM.
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  #7  
Old 12-31-2016, 03:26 AM
Marc780

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GSG Sturmgewehr, that somebody has modified to full-auto

"Don't try this etc.".

Having never given this type of thing much thought, I have no idea how (or why) he did this. Even so it's probably worth a look.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oi8VOLikbr4

Last edited by Marc780; 12-31-2016 at 07:15 AM.
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Old 01-02-2017, 09:33 PM
wildhobbybobby

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Don't file your front sight down to cure the problem of low POI with iron sights on the GSG Stg-44. First of all, there isn't enough front sight to file down, and second, it is an irreversible mutilation of the rifle. Do this instead. It is simple, reversible and brought my rifle to exact poa/poi with the rear sight all the way down. I used small nuts instead of washers:

http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_6_41/39...SG_StG_44.html
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Old 01-10-2017, 10:19 PM
Marc780

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Quote:
Originally Posted by wildhobbybobby View Post
Don't file your front sight down to cure the problem of low POI with iron sights on the GSG Stg-44. First of all, there isn't enough front sight to file down, and second, it is an irreversible mutilation of the rifle. Do this instead. It is simple, reversible and brought my rifle to exact poa/poi with the rear sight all the way down. I used small nuts instead of washers:

http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_6_41/39...SG_StG_44.html
This is a great idea actually, thanks for the tip. I don't have grinder, i might try a nylon spacer if i can't make washers with a square side.
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Old 01-12-2017, 01:07 PM
wildhobbybobby

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I used some small nuts that I had in my junk drawer in the garage. They were large enough to clear the screw threads but small enough to fit inside the sight base. No grinding necessary. They also turned out to be the exact right thickness to adjust the POI perfectly.
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Old 01-26-2017, 06:15 AM
Marc780

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What to do when your rifle shoots too low.

You have to give the designers at GSG some credit, the sights on this rifle are meticulously designed if not over-designed for a rifle of this type. They are just as good if not better then the iron sights on the real thing. But there's a problem with most of these rifles though: When you use the iron sights the rifle hits far too low. Even when the rear sight is adjusted all the way up to its maximum elevation, it still shoots too low!

If you plan to just use an optic all the time then you've already solved the problem. But for those using the iron sights though...problem. The cheapest and fast way to fix the problem is simply to file down the front sight. (Filing down the front sight post, raises the muzzle, when you line up the rear sight with it. Thus a shorter front sight post raises the point where the bullet strikes on target too.) Of course this is irreversible - know that once you start filing off metal there is obviously no putting it back on. So clearly a better solution is needed.


Other people have simply fabricated some way of raising the rear sight instead. This accomplishes the same thing as filing but without mangling anything. To do this, you need a spacer of some kind, nylon, metal, aluminum washers, anything that will fit over the rear sight screw posts. Start with spacers about 1/8 thick - stacking several washers ought to raise the sight this much. Notice in the image, the washers were ground flat on one side, to fit against the rear wall of the sight well. A nylon spacer might fit over the screw posts better, or even a short length of metal tubing.

To remove the rear sight, push the front part of the sight ramp down against the spring, then pull it out. Now pull out the leaf spring to access the two phillips screws, and remove the screws.

Last edited by Marc780; 01-26-2017 at 06:27 AM.
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Old 01-27-2017, 01:17 PM
fedude

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Thanks for awesome write-up Marc!!
I haven't taken my Stg-44 apart aside from the standard breakdown process to clean the bolt, but it is good to have the process documented for the inevitable time when I do need to get in there further.

Your input is much appreciated!

A query regarding the barrel: there are some other comments in various forums about play or wiggle in the barrel. Indeed, when I grasp mine while holding the main body of the rifle and try to move it, I get a bit of movement there. It's not loose enough by itself (say, like if it was on a bench rest) but it's not totally solid.
I'd have to think that using blue LocTite and tightening the screws that hold the barrel as you outline in Step 8 would be beneficial to reduce or stop the wiggle, so maybe I'll try that to make it more secure. I haven't noticed any issues with regards to accuracy or a different POI from shoot to shoot, but it may be a good preventative measure regardless.
Thoughts?

again, many thanks for your process.
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Old 01-30-2017, 01:30 AM
Marc780

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Fedude, I have seen posts on other sites, from other GSG owners with the loose barrel problem. I haven't looked into the fix in detail but these are a couple solutions they tried with more-or-less good results.

The easy way, a few people tried shimming the barrel into the receiver, to make the grip on the barrel tighter. A soda can could be cut into pieces for this, since it doesn't take anything exotic to make a simple shim.

Some people wanted a permanent fix and used a stock bedding solution to make the barrel fit more tightly. Acraglass from Brownell's is one such bedding compound and it goes for $24; if I had this problem, and the shims turned out to be unsatisfactory, I think I'd try bedding the barrel into the receiver using this stuff.

I think you could even use JB Weld for this if you just wanted something fast and cheap...why not? You might not want to glue the barrel in place for all eternity though - which is what would happen if you use JB Weld - so I'd coat the barrel section with grease first!

Last edited by Marc780; 01-31-2017 at 11:32 AM.
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Old 01-31-2017, 03:09 PM
fedude

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Thanks for the insights about the barrel, Marc. From the sound of things, it's not so much loose screw tension that could be rectified by tightening, but rather an issue with a size mismatch between barrel and mount.
Screw tension, shims and then bedding seems a logical progression to try and address any issues (comment about using grease or other release compound duly noted! lol), although as I said, mine isn't really problematic at this point.

cheers,
Bruce
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Old 05-08-2017, 05:35 AM
Marc780

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Before I even bought the rifle I read the tales of loose wobbly barrels but not experienced it, yet. Like I said I'd bed the barrel with the epoxy or JB Weld if it became a problem but have yet to have an issue.

The accuracy potential of this rifle is pretty good so if I wanted to maximize that I'd go with an optic and forget the iron sights, since this rifle is more accurate then the sights it comes with. i don't want to remove the irons if there's any way around it since i bought it for appearance, after all. If i wanted to hit something i'd get a 10/22. Half tempted to weld on that metal bar and mount German war time optics, a ZF4 or similar, German optics are generally excellent. Ebay is full of them if you want to pay the freight but then you'd need to find somebody to attach the metal bar...probably you'd want to attach the mount brazed or silver-soldered, I doubt the metal would withstand the heat of welding but I could be wrong.

Last edited by Marc780; 05-08-2017 at 05:43 AM.
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