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  #1  
Old 05-21-2018, 09:15 PM
EddieE

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Barrel Seasoning



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How many rounds does it take to season a factory barrel?

Does it make sense to season with cheap ammo, then move to your better ammo?
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  #2  
Old 05-21-2018, 09:21 PM
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Depends on the barrel and ammo. You can start with a clean bore and eley will settle in with usually less than 5 rounds.
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  #3  
Old 05-21-2018, 09:36 PM
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I think CZ recommends 500 rounds of standard velocity lead ammo to season. Mine settled in great with that figure.

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Old 05-21-2018, 09:42 PM
EddieE

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarge45 View Post
I think CZ recommends 500 rounds of standard velocity lead ammo to season. Mine settled in great with that figure.

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I think you are talking about breaking in. I mean seasoning between scrubbing/cleaning.
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Old 05-21-2018, 09:54 PM
JeffRCZ
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I have always found 5-10 rounds does the trick with good ammo.
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Old 05-21-2018, 09:55 PM
jaia
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E, after a serious cleaning, bore and chamber,
my 455 Varmint barrel needed 10 to 15 shots to return to normal.
Shots would move closer and closer to the crosshair alignment from before cleaning.
By the 15th shot poi and poa were back to normal at 50 yards.
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Old 05-21-2018, 09:57 PM
Miamigal
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season

One round for each inch of barrel is an old rule. So a 28 inch barrel you would shoot approximately 28 shells. Or whatever works for your barrel and ammo.
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Old 05-21-2018, 10:03 PM
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The softer European lubes seem to season faster. the waxy US a little longer. I have no opinion on the copper washed ammunition. I rarely shoot it.
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Old 05-22-2018, 12:18 AM
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Syntax

"Sarge45....I think CZ recommends 500 rounds of standard velocity lead ammo to season. Mine settled in great with that figure."

Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieE View Post
I think you are talking about breaking in. I mean seasoning between scrubbing/cleaning.
Like many other words that have morphed into something they are not "seasoning" of firearm barrels is one.

Seasoning means "Lapping" or "burnishing" or "smoothing" the bore out so that it approaches it's potential mechanical accuracy. With any rimfire round the abrasives in the priming compound does the lapping or burnishing or smoothing, which ever term you like with each shot.

What Master "Sarge45" describes is the correct use of the term and general frames of reference for seasoning a barrel are either 500 or 1,000 rounds and if the accuracy does not improve measurably by then, assuming the shooter is experienced and a good shooter then get a new barrel or a new gun if the results are not what that experienced shooter deems acceptable.

That does not mean MOA at 100 yards as few stock mass produced non target .22 non magnum rimfire rifles are capable of that on a consistent basis so expectations of that result is simply not valid.

Testing is done at 100 yards when first received with a variety of ammo and selecting the best performer which is the benchmark, then at 500 with comparisons to the benchmark and then at 1,000 again with comparisons to the benchmark and the 500 round results.

Re-lubing references the process of re-coating the bore with the lube in the case of cast bullets, and .22 lead bullets are cast bullets even if they are cold pressed and the lube is carried in the driving bans, after the lube had been removed via a good cleaning or between ammo changes.

Number of opinions how how many rounds that takes. Some say, based on their shooting 10 rounds or 15. Some say 1 round for every inch of barrel length. Some say it all depends on whether or not it is the 3rd Thursday of the month and the moon is full.

A few years ago 7 shooting buddies and I spent 7 months testing .22 non-magnum rimfire resizing dies. This is a sticky for a virus free PDF file on that extensive testing.

https://www.rimfirecentral.com/rfcftp...ng-project.pdf

We spent a month or so prior to the testing "talking" to ammo folks and manufacturers of mass produced non-target stock rifles about cleaning and re-lubing and there is a reference to what they said in the PDF on pages 7 and 8.

And based on those discussion we settled on 10 rounds after a fairly thorough cleaning between brands. Just shot em up, no records kept.

We then fired a string or 2 of 5 consecutive 5 round groups for "record" and "quarantined" any that were below the "base" measurements we had at the time which were as purchased, 500 and 1,000 whichever applied as not being lubed enough.

Your choice as to the protocol but I submit the correct syntax is important.

noremf(George)
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Old 05-22-2018, 02:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieE View Post
How many rounds does it take to season a factory barrel?

Does it make sense to season with cheap ammo, then move to your better ammo?
After cleaning some of my rifles, they shoot very precisely after only a few rounds. Others it may take as many as 20-25 rounds.

I "season" with same ammo I will shoot with, but a "seasoned" barrel usually settles in after an ammo change in 5-10 rounds
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Old 05-22-2018, 05:39 PM
Sarge45

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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieE View Post
I think you are talking about breaking in. I mean seasoning between scrubbing/cleaning.
Oh, sorry, lol. In that case it takes mine about 10 rounds to settle in.
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  #12  
Old 05-22-2018, 06:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieE View Post

How many rounds does it take to season a factory barrel?

Does it make sense to season with cheap ammo, then move to your better ammo?
Now that 22 LR is plentiful, and affordable, again, why not take an afternoon to conduct some experiments?

Clean with your normal routine, then fire cheap ammo till things settle down. Move to your more expensive ammo, and see how it reacts.

Do the same thing again, but skip the cheap ammo. See how long it takes to settle down again.

Repeat both versions a few times to get an idea of averages or trends.

Then decide if it is worthwhile or not to start with cheap stuff, and how long it takes various ammo to settle in again after cleaning, depending on how YOUR rifle reacts after YOUR cleaning routine.

It doesn't really matter what any of us tell you, cause they are not the same rifle, nor the same ammo, nor the same standards for what is good or bad, and what is acceptable or repeatable.

Last edited by Cold Bore; 05-22-2018 at 06:33 PM.
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  #13  
Old 05-22-2018, 06:45 PM
EddieE

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cold Bore View Post
Now that 22 LR is plentiful, and affordable, again, why not take an afternoon to conduct some experiments?

Clean with your normal routine, then fire cheap ammo till things settle down. Move to your more expensive ammo, and see how it reacts.

Do the same thing again, but skip the cheap ammo. See how long it takes to settle down again.

Repeat both versions a few times to get an idea of averages or trends.

Then decide if it is worthwhile or not to start with cheap stuff, and how long it takes various ammo to settle in again after cleaning, depending on how YOUR rifle reacts after YOUR cleaning routine.

It doesn't really matter what any of us tell you, cause they are not the same rifle, nor the same ammo, nor the same standards for what is good or bad, and what is acceptable or repeatable.
I could and would. However, I'd like to learn from other peoples experiences and get their view. Isn't that the point of this place? What I have the least of is time to waste. I like to be efficient. Even when shooting. If you are going to make every mistake for yourself, that is fine. I prefer to learn from other peoples mistakes and experiences, so that hopefully I make fewer mistakes of my own. If it is the general accepted practice to do things one way, over the other...then why swim upstream? Just follow the generally accepted way of doing it. There is a reason why its been done that way. Now I know, it takes most guns about 20-25 rounds to settle down. So, if mine is taking more, then there is an issue.

Last edited by EddieE; 05-22-2018 at 06:48 PM.
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  #14  
Old 05-22-2018, 08:30 PM
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Secret's in the sauce. If one switches from radically different ammo such as a slimy lubed ammo to a more firm waxed ammo like Eley or visa versa, it usually takes longer to return to full accuracy potential. Sticking with the same maker and moving from cheaper to more expensive ammo takes less time, ammo, and money to re-lube the bore. IME YMMV
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Old 05-23-2018, 11:10 AM
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Agree with Al. Save time and money by using the ammo you will be shooting.
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