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Old 05-18-2019, 10:24 PM
fourbore
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Fabricate & replace tip on double shotgun forend



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I need to place the ebony(?) tip on a double shotgun splinter for arm tip. I hope the terminology is correct, please see photo. Given my modest level of wood working ability, I think some type of black color wood epoxy. Or color match. A slow enough dry time that I can work with a razor to get 90% shaped.

I am open to any DIY ideas on this. It is a pretty nice gun, but; far from pristine. My goal is to loose the eye sore look with a repair that will hold up under some serious recoil.
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Old 05-19-2019, 10:28 AM
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Seems like you have quite the challenge set out for you there... If it were me, I would repair the chip out on the wood first and get it completely shaped before attempting the epoxy repair. Finding a piece of wood that closely matches the grain and color will be difficult but get it as close as you can, then carefully glue it into place. Let the piece run long on both ends and clamp it in place with some good glue or epoxy to hold it once dry. George used to recommend hide glue for this purpose but I'm afraid without his guidance that may be a thing of the past...

Once the glue dries, use very sharp chisels to cut it down close to the surface, then sand it flush so it looks like it belongs there. Shape the inlet where the epoxy will go so the area you're going to fill will look like it did originally. Create a form by taping a piece of thin cardboard or bendable plastic sheet to the stock on the bottom and wrap it around the tip. Hopefully, if you place it carefully enough and overlapping the edges where you want the epoxy to stop it will contain the epoxy. Use a parting agent on the cardboard/plastic so you can get it off later. If it were me, I would think seriously about using Acraglass Gel and add the black coloring that comes with it. You may be able to put it in place and then put the cardboard/plastic over it as it will stay put pretty well once you smear it on. You can always come back and mix up more later and fill voids if necessary.

I'm sure I've made this about clear as mud so if you have any questions, ask away. If you're more than a little confused about this whole thing I would consider giving it to someone who does these kind of repairs on a regular basis.

Bob
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Old 05-19-2019, 11:08 AM
fourbore
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Thanks Bob, That is clear. I will see what I can do.
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Old 05-23-2019, 08:07 AM
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I probably have a chunk of ebony you could try and shape to fit if you want.
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Old 05-23-2019, 09:16 AM
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That's a knotty one.

Bob is correct about fixing the wood first. Fortunately the photo suggests it is very dark and little grain shows. If you are good with wood, you can attempt inletting a piece of tight-grained scrap wood. If your skill set is less than artisan, I would default to epoxy, dark-tinted Acraglas, for bonding and fill. Topical color blending to make the old and new wood flow.

Ebony can be hard to find, expensive, and a %%%%% to shape. A lot of ebony will still require some tinting to make it black black, so you might be better off going for something a bit cheaper and easier to work like blackwood (which will almost certainly require some tinting unless you are okay with an off-black color or some striping). Check Woodcraft.com.

If the inlay is carefully fit, the ebony can be set in with any number of glues/epoxies. Check the web for recommendations. Be mindful that ebony and blackwood are both oily by nature, and will require a good soak in acetone to get the oil out of the wood surface before gluing.
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