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Old 02-26-2020, 10:23 AM
dotchief
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Bore Cleaning



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Well, I read so many comments about the Teslong Borescope I asked Santa for one. He delivered!

So, we all clean our barrels in various ways and with various solvents and oils. To that end, I conducted an assessment of my cleaning procedures and solvents to determine if the process I've employed for decades was actually cleaning my gun barrels. The following description and photos illustrate my assessment.

BACKGROUND
I have been using molybdenum disulfide (moly) to coat my bullets for over 25 years. I have found that this process significantly reduces copper barrel fouling. In addition, moly coated bullets inhibit barrel heat when shooting in a sustained event; i.e. practice, load development, prairie dogging.

CLEANING PROCEDURES
My procedures are straightforward. Each rifle action has a bore guide and a solvent port to ensure proper rod insertion into the bore. I use a patch saturated in solvent and shove it through the barrel. I examine the patch for residue. I then insert a bore mop soaked with my copper removing solvent. I leave the solvent in the barrel for approximately 10 minutes. I then make one complete pass, down the barrel and back, for EACH round I fired. In the instant case, I fired 25 rounds. Therefore, I stroked the barrel 25 times. I then shove a patch saturated with solvent down the barrel to remove the "scrubbing" residue. I examine the patch. I repeat as necessary. When the patch comes out with little residue, I shove a patch saturated with Kroil through the barrel. I examine the patch. And, finally, I shove a dry patch through the barrel. The inside of the barrel is now coated with a very thin coat of Kroil.

BORE SCOPE PHOTOS
The above procedures have been used my entire life for cleaning barrels. However, solvents have greatly improved over the years ensuring that most, if not all, of the copper and powder fouling is removed.

Until I received this bore scope, I had no idea what the inside of the barrel looked like after shooting. Nor did I have any idea that the barrel was cleaned!

The following set of photos illustrate the before and after photos of my gun barrel. The barrel is a Krieger Stainless Air-Gauged in a Remington varmint configuration. It is 26 inches long and is chambered for the .22 BR (Benchrest).

To ensure a reliable assessment, I used a piece of 3/4" masking tape secured to the bore scope cable measuring 15 inches from the lighted end. The cable was inserted from the muzzle to ensure accuracy of placement. This procedure proved very helpful in the assessment.

This view illustrates the gray moly in the barrel.


Note the very dark moly enhanced by the Hoppes


The first 25 passes with the nylon brush failed to removed the moly.


I ran a patch of Hoppes No. 9 and a patch of Barnes CR10 through the barrel


Hoppes was not removing the moly as I had hoped. So I changed to the CR10.


I settled on the CR10 and continued the procedure as described above.




The final patches were what I hoped they would be.


The cleaning jags are all deployed on the end of a Dewey nylon coated rod.


CONCLUSION
I have used Hoppes for my entire life as a solvent. My Dad used it. I used it. However, this assessment clearly indicated that the "new" Hoppes and moly don't get along. While Hoppes will fulfill my everyday cleaning chores of powder residue, it won't remove moly.

I've used CR10 and Kroil for over 25 years. CR10 is just aggressive enough to remove the moly buildup without damaging the bore. I've used it in blued steel and stainless barrels. It has rendered the same cleaning results. Kroil, well, it speaks for itself. Light and effective.

Hope this post provides a little insight into just how good these Teslong scopes are for examining barrels. While far from the cost of a high end bore scope, they do the job for a guy like me. This exercise has proved that my cleaning procedures render a clean barrel.

Thanks for your time.
Pat G
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Old 02-26-2020, 10:52 AM
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Good write-up and photos, thanks for sharing that.
I have seen many good reviews here of that bore scope, may have to give it a try. I don't shoot moly, but want to get all the copper gilding out of the bores when I clean.
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Old 03-12-2020, 10:02 PM
john300exc
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Your post convinced me I needed one of those borescopes. I was actually surprised how good my 22 rimfires looked. One has a carbon ring that needs removal. Centerfires not so good, especially an old 243 that I had not shot in 20 years and that was on a prairie dog shoot. There were extensive copper deposits in this old rifle. I tried several of the newer copper removal wonder agents and observed virtually no change in the copper. Even bore paste made no difference. I decided to go old school and found a bottle of Sweet's 7.62. Several applications completely removed all traces of copper. I assumed these newer agents were working, but without the Teslong I really had no idea what was happening in my barrels. This inexpensive borescope delivers excellent, clear images and pictures or video is easily recorded. Thanks for the heads up, I wasn't aware they were available.

Last edited by john300exc; 03-12-2020 at 10:05 PM.
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Old 03-13-2020, 04:27 AM
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I don't use moly, I used a slightly wet patch with Rem oil for my final pass. This seems to keep the copper off the metal.

How are you sure that's moly and not hard carbon?
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Old 03-13-2020, 08:16 AM
dotchief
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Trust me,

it's moly. My bullets are black not copper when they are seated in the cases.
Moreover, "hard carbon" would not clean up as easy. I did some testing years ago, maybe 20 plus, of the moly vs copper bullets. Each and every time I cleaned the barrel with the moly bullets, the patches were black. When I cleaned the copper bullet barrel, the patches were greenish blue. This was the primary reason I started to shoot exclusively moly coated bullets. And, the barrels indicated less heat build up with the moly bullets.

Pat G
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Old 03-13-2020, 04:21 PM
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I ask because my limited experience (using a borescope) on a fouled barrel showed layers of carbon and copper. I had to alternate cleaning methods between copper remover and carbon.

I can see that Moly would reduce copper fouling, but I don't see how that would stop carbon buildup.
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Old 03-13-2020, 04:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dgeesaman View Post
I ask because my limited experience (using a borescope) on a fouled barrel showed layers of carbon and copper. I had to alternate cleaning methods between copper remover and carbon.

I can see that Moly would reduce copper fouling, but I don't see how that would stop carbon buildup.
If the barrel is a good one, and broken in properly, it should not collect any copper. As far as the moly and carbon... I do not see how this is relevant. My last custom rifle that is in the classifieds, and the 2 before that one, all 3 of them... not one of them had a copper issue, and they all just needed a few wet patches of Hoppes #9 and dry patches after. It is a varmint rig but BR accurate. With my break in process for a new barrel, and using good barrels, I have not had one yet build up any copper. Copper cleaner is the worst thing you can use unless you are a BR shooter and go through 3 barrels every summer then yes, they all use copper cleaner, and they have to replace their barrels every couple of months.
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Old 03-13-2020, 04:59 PM
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Good writeup by the OP. The only question I have is about using the same number of brush strokes as the number of rounds fired. If you only shoot 25 rounds this may be fine, but what if you shoot 200? It seems to me that you will be doing far more wear to your barrel by cleaning it than you ever would shooting it.
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Old 03-17-2020, 07:38 AM
dotchief
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I

would never shoot 200 rounds without cleaning a barrel in a centerfire rifle. I have never fired more than 30 rounds before I cleaned the barrel.

Pat G
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Old 03-17-2020, 11:39 AM
farm boy
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Everyone seems to have their own cleaning schedule. I used to clean after every range session. What was found is that with my rifle it is not necessary. Let the rifle tell you what it needs and when it needs more. Sometimes all mine needs is a pull though with a bore snake and other times it may need a more though cleaning. Different powders will dirty a barrel at different rates.
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Old 03-17-2020, 01:32 PM
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Years ago I read some negative reviews of moly coated ammo thus avoided experimenting with em.

So whats the best way to clean a cf barrel? Al wondered to himself instigatingly.
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