Refinish my own 52C stock - RimfireCentral.com Forums

Go Back   RimfireCentral.com Forums > > >

Join Team RFC to remove these ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-21-2020, 12:47 PM
chicks2111

Join Date: 
Feb 2018
Location: 
Washington
Posts: 
176
TPC Rating: 
100% (17)
Refinish my own 52C stock



Log in to see fewer ads
OK I have not found any professional interested in taking this on, so here I go. Now I'm just hoping someone can steer me to a reference book, article, forum piece or other source so I can enlighten myself on a total refinish of my stock. Not too interested in a Tru Oil finish. Pointers appreciated.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-21-2020, 01:16 PM
Flintlock28's Avatar
Flintlock28
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Apr 2011
Posts: 
2,614
TPC Rating: 
100% (3)
Quote:
Originally Posted by chicks2111 View Post
OK I have not found any professional interested in taking this on, so here I go. Now I'm just hoping someone can steer me to a reference book, article, forum piece or other source so I can enlighten myself on a total refinish of my stock. Not too interested in a Tru Oil finish. Pointers appreciated.
Stay away from that silly Tru-oil.....use Dyes, along with Lacquer, to give you the easiest, nicest finish for your rifle. There was a man on this site, that passed away. he went by "noremf"as his screen name. Do a search for any of his articles. He was an amazing woodworker, and even redid I believe a desk for Thomas Jefferson, commissioned by a Museum. George also used to work for Sherwin Williams, and other coating companies.

Anyway, I used Tru-oil, and it worked well for me, than noremf showed me the Golden path of using Dyes, along with Lacquer, for a nicer, easier finish. Read anything He posted on refinishing a stock.

Good luck.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-21-2020, 01:19 PM
Flintlock28's Avatar
Flintlock28
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Apr 2011
Posts: 
2,614
TPC Rating: 
100% (3)
https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forum...d.php?t=520722
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #4  
Old 09-21-2020, 03:23 PM
chicks2111

Join Date: 
Feb 2018
Location: 
Washington
Posts: 
176
TPC Rating: 
100% (17)
Wow

Thanks, that oughta' keep me busy for a couple years!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-21-2020, 03:36 PM
justinp61 is online now
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Jun 2012
Location: 
W.KY Go Cards & Wildcats
Posts: 
859
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
I've had good luck with Minwax wipe on poly both in satin and gloss.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-21-2020, 03:53 PM
Baltimoreed11754

Join Date: 
Jun 2015
Location: 
Aurora, NC
Posts: 
238
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Refinished my 1924 Pre A slow-lock with birchwood caseys red walnut military stain and truoil, repaired some damage and recut the sanded grasping grooves. I like the way it turned out. Good luck on your refinish, please post pictures when you’re done.
Attached Images
File Type: jpeg B3F22B02-806B-47B0-9F8C-FEEC66286574.jpeg (320.2 KB, 13 views)
File Type: jpeg 87BF3500-A417-4F08-A01B-394F217CD8DC.jpeg (351.0 KB, 13 views)
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-21-2020, 07:56 PM
Flintlock28's Avatar
Flintlock28
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Apr 2011
Posts: 
2,614
TPC Rating: 
100% (3)
Quote:
Originally Posted by chicks2111 View Post
Thanks, that oughta' keep me busy for a couple years!
Don't be intimidated, I've refinished about 9 stocks, and most of the time, you'll have little problems.

Here's some rules:

1) Nothing shows the beauty of Wood like Shellac; but Shellac doesn't do well with wear..i.e great for a jewelry box or something that isn't handled much, but not firearms, where you get sweat, dirt, abrasion, etc.

2) Next best thing for showing Wood's beauty....Lacquer, which is derived from the Lac insect, just like Shellac is.

3) Most stocks, just need very light sanding, and occasionally you can put a wet towel over dents, and apply a Clothes iron to the towel, on top of the Wood. this causes the Wood to swell, and out comes the dent....not always 100%, but I've gotten rid of a lot of dents this way.

4) After sanding, you can test what the color will look like, with Lacquer applied, by rubbing Mineral Spirits on the Wood, this will give you a couple minutes or so, to see what the Lacquer will look like. After a couple of minutes, the Mineral Spirits will start to dry, and the wood turns back to it's color, without Mineral spirits.

5) if the color is fine, you can spray Lacquer over the sanded Wood. If the color isn't what you want, you can use Dyes, that work better and deeper than stains, before you apply lacquer.

Here's an Winchester model 1873, i used Dye, and Lacquer on...

https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forum....php?t=1203725

good luck
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 09-22-2020, 05:13 PM
cleanprone
US Air Force Veteran

Join Date: 
May 2013
Location: 
Ohio
Posts: 
869
TPC Rating: 
100% (2)
"Winchester red"

Just a suggestion, lots of good advice above. Look in the muzzleloading forums, particularly the "American Longrifle" forum. A large amount of their content is about longrifle stock making AND FINISHING. They also discuss traditional techniques which relate to the Winchester processes. There is a huge amount of information to be found, plus some products and techniques which are almost exclusive to the muzzleloading community. Lots of your trial/mistakes can be reversed, example- a too glossy (Tru-Oil) type finish may be cut back with 0000 steel wool. The "Herters red" finish is close to the original early Winchesters and somebody is reproducing it, I got a close match by blending Homer Dangler brown and red stains, diluted and used on scrap woods to find a close match, then the Minwax wipe on poly cut back with rottenstone.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 09-22-2020, 05:46 PM
usmc69 is online now
US Marines Veteran

Join Date: 
Apr 2004
Location: 
East of the Stick Marsh in Florida
Posts: 
5,709
TPC Rating: 
100% (8)
Two words......Tung Oil......requires some elbow grease, but the end result is beautiful.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 09-22-2020, 06:13 PM
sweetmk
US Navy Veteran

Join Date: 
Dec 2010
Location: 
Near Roanoke VA
Posts: 
1,771
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
Quote:
Originally Posted by usmc69 View Post
Two words......Tung Oil......requires some elbow grease, but the end result is beautiful.
AND, there are many terms,, WOW,,
Tung oil is a pressed seed oil,,
Linseed oil is a pressed seed oil, of the flax seed,,
There is regular linseed oil, then there is "boiled linseed oil" or BLO,,

An elderly neighbor died, his wife gave me his woodworking stuff,,
among the finishes is,, WAIT FOR IT,,,!

Refined linseed oil,,
Now, what in the heck is that!!??

I put the refined linseed oil on a new ash axe handle that I bought at a flea market for $2.
Other than cutting down a tree, you can not get a much cheaper piece of wood, than a $2 axe handle.

That axe handle is so nice, I would be proud to have the finish on any gun that I owned.

Is there a lot to learn, or what!?
I sanded that axe handle with a 4" Makita 60 grit belt sander, then 240 and 320 grit on a random orbital sander, then hand sanded with 600 grit paper,,

Who would guess that a 4", 60 grit, belt sander could be used near anything that could be considered nice!!?
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:28 PM.

Privacy Policy

DMCA Notice

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2000-2018 RimfireCentral.com
x