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Old 01-03-2019, 03:00 PM
Test_Engineer

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As I peruse the threads in this forum, I see a lot of methods to make a knife sharp. Sandpaper, stones, ceramics, and so on. These methods all have one thing in common - they remove steel to produce a new edge.

Maybe this forum should be called "Making Them Sharp"?

My first decent paying job after high school was working in a meat packing house. You were issued a mesh apron, mesh gloves, a plastic arm guard, a helmet, a metal "holster" and 2 knives. Your knives would get pretty dull very fast removing hundreds of bones every hour and you could only trade in your knives before work and during your lunch break. If you couldn't keep up, you'd be written up and possibly fired.

There certainly wasn't any time for "sharpening" your knives as most threads in this forum describe. Instead, you had to learn how to Keep Them Sharp.

This involves straightening the edge that's already there. We were also issued a steel for this. Once I learned how to use one properly and how to "feel" what the edge was needing, sharpening or trading in knives became a waste of time that only "rookies" did.

My stones, ceramics, and other "sharpening" systems collect dust for years between uses. A simple steel keeps all my knives shaving sharp. You would think that there might be some threads on here about how to use a steel. But maybe very few here can actually "read" an edge?
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Old 01-03-2019, 03:09 PM
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I fully agree with the above. I learned the hard way, though on a cheap knife. I had a beloved Opinel with a carbon steel blade. Sharpened it with a sharpening "system" every time I thought the blade needed a touch up. In two years or so, I worked through so much of the blade's steel that the thumb knick is no longer proud of the wooden frame when the knife is closed. I now instead use the steel we keep next to the kitchen knives for a quick touch up. Using it removes much less of the blade's material. I think my GEC's are heaving sighs of relief.
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Old 01-07-2019, 08:16 PM
mushka
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I carve some and strop regularly rather than re-sharpen the blade.
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Old 01-27-2019, 02:55 AM
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JAMES WHITTEN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Test_Engineer View Post
As I peruse the threads in this forum, I see a lot of methods to make a knife sharp. Sandpaper, stones, ceramics, and so on. These methods all have one thing in common - they remove steel to produce a new edge.

Maybe this forum should be called "Making Them Sharp"?

My first decent paying job after high school was working in a meat packing house. You were issued a mesh apron, mesh gloves, a plastic arm guard, a helmet, a metal "holster" and 2 knives. Your knives would get pretty dull very fast removing hundreds of bones every hour and you could only trade in your knives before work and during your lunch break. If you couldn't keep up, you'd be written up and possibly fired.

There certainly wasn't any time for "sharpening" your knives as most threads in this forum describe. Instead, you had to learn how to Keep Them Sharp.

This involves straightening the edge that's already there. We were also issued a steel for this. Once I learned how to use one properly and how to "feel" what the edge was needing, sharpening or trading in knives became a waste of time that only "rookies" did.

My stones, ceramics, and other "sharpening" systems collect dust for years between uses. A simple steel keeps all my knives shaving sharp. You would think that there might be some threads on here about how to use a steel. But maybe very few here can actually "read" an edge?
That's good info! To create a correct edge bevel is what most people struggle with. It is extremely difficult to actually set a symmetrical bevel. There's lots of gadgets and tools out there now that helps do this correctly. Now that being said, don't hesitate to share your wisdom on the subject of reading an edge and the proper ways of maintaining a edge. I have always felt that the first step was to get the correct bevel and then maintain the edge afterwards. But if your getting sharp blades to start with ,I guess you don't have to worry about it. How do you set a bevel on a dull blade or any blade for that matter?
James
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Old 01-27-2019, 09:21 AM
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Reading the edge. Edge facing upwards ,I run my thumb up over the edge to see which way the edge is bent, I then steel that side to straighten the edge. I donít steel the other side cause that just rebends it.when dragging a blade across a steel or a stone use the lowest angle possible.
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Old 07-11-2019, 08:00 AM
TOMBECK
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Would appreciate suggested brands and sources for steel for sharpening and possible illustrations or videos of correct use. Will they work on pocket knife sized blades?

Remember a long round steel my grandfather used when getting ready to cut ham and turkey at the Thanksgiving dinner (1940s).
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Old 07-11-2019, 08:18 AM
Ferox34
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Dad was a butcher.

He knew the value of keeping his knives sharp, used a steel regularly and a leather strop occasionally.

And to answer the last poster's question, yes, you can use a steel on anything with an edge.
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Old 07-11-2019, 08:58 AM
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So, how about comments regarding steel design, the type of steel used to make it, can one 'steel' an edge with a brass rod, does a hard ceramic stick do much the same as it is not aggressively cutting the edge, does the steel need the grooves/ridges or can it be smooth as in a piece of polished drill rod.
Thats it off the top of my head for now.
Pls help, Im obsessed....
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