Annealing Cases - RimfireCentral.com Forums

Go Back   RimfireCentral.com Forums > > >

Notices

Join Team RFC to remove these ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-20-2017, 10:55 AM
doubs43 is online now
US Air Force Veteran NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Apr 2008
Location: 
Middle GA, USA
Posts: 
5,102
TPC Rating: 
100% (2)
Annealing Cases



Log in to see fewer ads
It would be nice to own an annealing machine but I can't afford to pay $1,100... or even half that. Sooooo..... what to do?

The biggest problem, IMO, is applying even heat 360 degrees around the case. To do that, the case must turn at a constant rate. My solution is one I'm sure others have already thought of but here's how I did it.

An old record turntable was set up. It plays 33 & 45 RPM records. I took two baking pans and placed one upside down over the spindle. The other I filled with water to the appropriate level and sat on top of the first one's bottom.

The speed was set on 45RPM and a case set in the center of the pan with the water about 1/8 inch below the shoulder. Primers had been removed so the case has water inside too.

The turntable was turned on and a propane torch applied heat to the case above the waterline as it turned. For a .223 case, 15 - 20 seconds seems about right. Time can be adjusted for other cases. After heating, the case is tipped over and a new one placed in the pan.

Not as precise as an expensive purpose built machine but with a bit of practice you can get pretty good at it. Just be sure to have a safe work area because of the open flame.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-20-2017, 11:36 AM
DRS's Avatar
DRS
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Aug 2003
Location: 
Backwoods Of Kentucky
Posts: 
2,468
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
When I anneal my brass cases, I use a propane torch set on low flame. I take a power drill and install a proper Lee shell holder from a case length gauge and chucking the 1/4" shank into the electric drill. I then let the shell case rotate at a slow speed while holding it in the flame, until the neck turns red. Then stick the case into cold water to cool. Found this method to be very simple and practical.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-20-2017, 12:25 PM
doubs43 is online now
US Air Force Veteran NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Apr 2008
Location: 
Middle GA, USA
Posts: 
5,102
TPC Rating: 
100% (2)
Quote:
Originally Posted by DRS View Post
When I anneal my brass cases, I use a propane torch set on low flame. I take a power drill and install a proper Lee shell holder from a case length gauge and chucking the 1/4" shank into the electric drill. I then let the shell case rotate at a slow speed while holding it in the flame, until the neck turns red. Then stick the case into cold water to cool. Found this method to be very simple and practical.
I considered your method but rejected it for one reason: the water acts as a heat sync that prevents too much heat going farther down the case body and making the case too soft mid-section. I get a very distinct line on the case between the annealed area and below the water line.

That's not a criticism of your method and, if it works for you, then you have no reason to change.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #4  
Old 03-21-2017, 03:29 AM
JDWinCO's Avatar
JDWinCO

Join Date: 
Aug 2010
Posts: 
1,416
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
Simplest way to anneal cases is the candle method. A basic votive candle is lit, hold the case at the halfway point and hold the shoulder to the flame. Roll the case around and hen the middle gets too hot to hold set the eon a wet cloth or paper towel.Wipe clean and move to the next.

I did over 1300 cases ove to nights watching TV in the winter. Cheap and easy. Slick. Learned that trick from a gun writer who learned it from one of his mentors.

On the other hand it is fun to find a use for the junk in the garage.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-21-2017, 05:30 AM
DRS's Avatar
DRS
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Aug 2003
Location: 
Backwoods Of Kentucky
Posts: 
2,468
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Quote:
Originally Posted by DRS View Post
When I anneal my brass cases, I use a propane torch set on low flame. I take a power drill and install a proper Lee shell holder from a case length gauge and chucking the 1/4" shank into the electric drill. I then let the shell case rotate at a slow speed while holding it in the flame, until the neck turns red. Then stick the case into cold water to cool. Found this method to be very simple and practical.
Quote:
Originally Posted by doubs43 View Post
I considered your method but rejected it for one reason: the water acts as a heat sync that prevents too much heat going farther down the case body and making the case too soft mid-section. I get a very distinct line on the case between the annealed area and below the water line.

That's not a criticism of your method and, if it works for you, then you have no reason to change.
I ONLY anneal the neck area of the cartridge case. The mid section is MEDIUM hard while the head is HARD. Just recently I annealed a bunch of .25-20 Win. & .308 Brass using my method, and no problems have arose.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-21-2017, 07:25 AM
rkittine
US Air Force Veteran NRA Member - Click Here To Join! Appleseed Rifleman

Join Date: 
Aug 2014
Location: 
Manhattan & Sag Harbor, N.Y.
Posts: 
170
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
A guy on www.Burntpowder.com build a home made automatic annealer and posted it on You Tube like many others. The difference was that he was wiling to both share the full construction in detailed steps on BurntPowder and build me one, delivered for $250.00. It handles my 6PPC, 6BR, .22-250, 6.5X47L, and .308 with nothing more than a slight adjustment of the flame point. Loads 100-150 cases depending on the caliber. I had a couple of propane tanks from past BBQ grills, which provide plenty of gas inventory.

Bob
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-21-2017, 07:48 AM
NF1E
US Marines Veteran NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Oct 2013
Location: 
NW CT
Posts: 
328
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Been using a Giraud annealer and also his power trimmer for a few years. Worth the extra bucks for something that is efficient. I am looking forward to picking up his induction heater so I can eliminate an open flame in the shop.

http://

Semper Fi
Art
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-22-2017, 05:14 PM
bichettereds's Avatar
bichettereds
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Jul 2010
Location: 
Miamisburg, OH
Posts: 
981
TPC Rating: 
100% (61)
Take a close look at the Anealeez. Under $300, and works great!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-23-2017, 07:47 AM
rkittine
US Air Force Veteran NRA Member - Click Here To Join! Appleseed Rifleman

Join Date: 
Aug 2014
Location: 
Manhattan & Sag Harbor, N.Y.
Posts: 
170
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Isn't that a lubricant? Maybe for your Bolt!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-23-2017, 08:35 AM
LongRange1

Join Date: 
Dec 2016
Posts: 
207
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
heres my set up...i think i paid $20 bucks for the drill at the flea market and i made the brackets outta metal i had lying around....i run tempilaq 750 inside about 10 necks and anneal a couple and count until it burns off then run 20-30 cases counting off then another case with the tempilaq to check timing...my cases anneal at 3-6 seconds.



Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 03-23-2017, 08:46 AM
Trigger1212
US Marines Veteran NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Mar 2016
Location: 
65 miles south of Chicago IL
Posts: 
275
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Benchscource Annealer

Check out the Benchsource annealing machine. As a young lad I had read an article regarding annealing brass which was very close to some of the manual methods mentioned above. Dad had some 222 brass that had been reloaded a zillion time and was just horribly hard in the neck area, real bear to get through the resizing dies.

YES! That's what I'll do, I'll anneal the brass like in the article and present them to Dad with a flourish and a Ta-Daaaaa! and he will be ever so pleased, not! Needless to say didn't work out that way, waaaay over heated the necks, all soft as putty and ruined. Dad was not impressed and neither was I, never annealed another piece of brass.

UNTIL, I purchased a CZ 527 in 17 HH a few years ago. Could NOT find any loaded rounds, except for the scalpers on-line, and I would let the rifle set before I paid that. Ended up finding the Saubier.com small caliber website and read a bunch of articles about converting 22 Hornet brass to 17 HH. The key to the success of this operation was you HAD to anneal the brass to make it work. Hornet brass is short and thin with very little room for error. Hmmmmn, what to do?

On that sight there was an article on the Benchsource annealing machine. Looked very easy to use, micro adjustable and could handle virtually any case size or shape. The around $400, took the plunge as it pretty much takes out ALL the human variables, every case will be annealed EXACTLY like the next. In my mind it was some of the best money I have ever spent on reloading equipment.

It can run two propane torches for those tough jobs, I've only ever set it up with one. I annealed 500 cases of Privi 22 H in short order and then loaded up 10 fireforming loads. 3 of the 10 shoulders split, not good! Ran the brass back through the annealer and adjusted it with the turn of a dial to keep them in the flame a few hundreds of a second longer so they got juuuuuust a little brighter red and gave them another try, no split neck and away I went. Wish I had this as a young Lad, might have impressed my Da then!

If you can swing it AT ALL, get a mechanical annealer that will work with any brass/cartridge you have or reload for and you will find that you actually use it for all your reloading instead of just for those jobs you HAVE to do.

Good luck on your choice, let us know what you decide!

Cheers!

Wade
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 03-23-2017, 08:49 AM
Trigger1212
US Marines Veteran NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Mar 2016
Location: 
65 miles south of Chicago IL
Posts: 
275
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Long Range,

Interesting set-up! That's what I love about these forums, the interesting ideas that are presented and ingenuity shown. Well done!

Cheers!

Wade
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 03-23-2017, 09:06 AM
DRS's Avatar
DRS
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Aug 2003
Location: 
Backwoods Of Kentucky
Posts: 
2,468
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Quote:
Originally Posted by LongRange1 View Post
heres my set up...i think i paid $20 bucks for the drill at the flea market and i made the brackets outta metal i had lying around....i run tempilaq 750 inside about 10 necks and anneal a couple and count until it burns off then run 20-30 cases counting off then another case with the tempilaq to check timing...my cases anneal at 3-6 seconds.



That's my basic way I annealing my brass.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 03-23-2017, 10:02 AM
Arrowhead
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Feb 2006
Location: 
southeastern NM
Posts: 
2,604
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Heating case necks red is not necessary. For a very good article on the science of annealing cases go to BisonBallistics.com and scroll down to the article on case annealing. You will find that brass anneals between 650-700 degrees which is far below the temperature where it turns red. You are just wasting time and propane to get it any hotter.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 03-23-2017, 10:52 AM
LongRange1

Join Date: 
Dec 2016
Posts: 
207
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
750 is supposed to be the magic number any hotter and you start ruining cases.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:12 AM.

Privacy Policy

DMCA Notice

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2000-2018 RimfireCentral.com
x