Gevarm French rifles and info - RimfireCentral.com Forums

Go Back   RimfireCentral.com Forums > >

Notices

Join Team RFC to remove these ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-07-2015, 01:08 PM
Lakeside Machine

Join Date: 
Apr 2010
Location: 
Arkansas
Posts: 
266
TPC Rating: 
100% (3)
Gevarm French rifles and info



Log in to see fewer ads
I posted this in the classifieds in hopes to stir up some data and interest. I have searched the data base here, but it came up with mostly general stuff. There seems to Be an occasional owner here and there through the years that has one but that's about it. I know the late Gevarmgunnut member had some and shared the passion for them as I do, but he is not with us anymore. I have collected many documents and info on them to where I can correctly identify the models and prove what they are by Gevelot/Gevarm advertising. I have documents being translated presently and hopefully will be able to post this info in the upcoming weeks.

Copy from the classifieds...
"Hello fellas, I collect Gevarm firearms in rimfire or centerfire. I am looking for guns working or not, parts, catalogs, letterhead, old store advertisements, etc...

Send me a message with what you may have for sale.
I'm also in the middle of doing research on the history and model specific data. I hope to compile enough data from the French paperwork I already have to help make the history on these fine little gems more clear. If you have one or have a nugget of data or info that you think may help in the research, let me know too!!"

Thanks!!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-07-2015, 01:43 PM
natman's Avatar
natman
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Jul 2002
Posts: 
3,321
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
It's good to see someone pick up the mantle from GevarmGunNut. I miss him.

Going through my stuff I ran across the invoice from when I bought a Gevarm E1 magazine.

Western Gun Parts (WGP)
Edmonton AB, Canada
[email protected]
http://www.westerngunparts.com/

Worth checking out if you need Gevarm parts.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-07-2015, 02:51 PM
Lakeside Machine

Join Date: 
Apr 2010
Location: 
Arkansas
Posts: 
266
TPC Rating: 
100% (3)
Thanks for the link. I was aware of them for the aftermarket magazines. I have some of those but prefer factory. I went to their site but there is no info of what they actually have on hand. I guess I have to send them an email to find out. I'm not in need of any parts at the moment. The parts just don't wear out!! I generally scrounge online and at shows when they pop up. Paper documents are tough to find as through the years these things get thrown out.
Unfortunately the Gevarm 22's were not marked with the model numbers, you have to know what feature change is on the firearm to know the model. I am looking for a model A1 right now. That is the first model made and has a distinct step from the receiver to the barrel. It is my missing link.

Through the years I even found the C1 rifle in 222 rem. Very neat rifle and it is amazing how much tooling/machining was shared between the rimfires and this centerfire design.

I have one more Gevarm catalog coming from France end of this month. This will answer and prove a lot of questions regarding models and features. When I get this in house I'll begin posting pictures of this stuff for the rest of the Gevnuts out there.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #4  
Old 03-14-2015, 12:09 PM
Lakeside Machine

Join Date: 
Apr 2010
Location: 
Arkansas
Posts: 
266
TPC Rating: 
100% (3)
1st generation Gevarm brochure

Through the years I have acquired old literature for the long gone Gevarm rifles. As previously stated, it is difficult to know models as none of the rimfire rifles were marked with a model number. To add to the confusion, there were export versions that sported certain features that only were intended to be sold in the USA. Since the early 50's the Gevelot/Gevarm rifles changed until they vanished from the scene all together. Hopefully my assembly of items I plan on posting over the next few days will gather some clarity in what collectors may have wondered for years.

Here is an original Gevarm A1 brochure.



Here is the inside of the A1 brochure. Notice the distinctive step from the reciever to the barrel. Also the open ejection port or breech area is found on this early model.

Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-14-2015, 07:33 PM
Lakeside Machine

Join Date: 
Apr 2010
Location: 
Arkansas
Posts: 
266
TPC Rating: 
100% (3)
Here is a transitional brochure from the original A1 and into the A2 model. At his point in their marketing they are introducing the more stylish model A2. What you will see here is the introduction of the tangent rear sight and target aperture front sight along with the stepped barrel contour. There is the first mention of the 22 short cartridge on the last page of this brochure. Unfortunately there are no further illustrations with this brochure, and it is all in French.


Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-14-2015, 07:54 PM
Lakeside Machine

Join Date: 
Apr 2010
Location: 
Arkansas
Posts: 
266
TPC Rating: 
100% (3)
This is the earliest Gevarm rifle brochure I have that was tanslated for the American market. It has a very broken English translation in some areas. The model is not designated by the usual "A" model, but only called the "Sterling Model". This is known in France as the new A2 version during that time. Some notes.... There is basic mention of the pistol grip compartment for the sight apertures. This is the first mention of how the rifle achieved "New Velocities" because of the double strike firing design.




Last edited by Lakeside Machine; 03-14-2015 at 08:19 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-14-2015, 07:57 PM
Lakeside Machine

Join Date: 
Apr 2010
Location: 
Arkansas
Posts: 
266
TPC Rating: 
100% (3)

Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-14-2015, 08:12 PM
Lakeside Machine

Join Date: 
Apr 2010
Location: 
Arkansas
Posts: 
266
TPC Rating: 
100% (3)
This Gevarm brochure is the French A2 release advertisement. This is the first illustrated offering of the pistol grip storage for the 5 front sight apertures. Funny how they would offer that to themselves first huh? Notice how this A2 still has the fully open breech area compared to later models. There still is no butt plate offered yet either, that was an American thing!




Last edited by Lakeside Machine; 03-14-2015 at 08:20 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-15-2015, 10:55 AM
Lakeside Machine

Join Date: 
Apr 2010
Location: 
Arkansas
Posts: 
266
TPC Rating: 
100% (3)
Are my fello Gevnuts confused yet?? Well, this next set of brochures should cloud your details even more!

This next brochure is in an American format but reminiscent of the French color and print style of the earlier models. This is labeled as the A3 model. In many discussions, this is the "A" model we mostly hear about in the US. This version boldly offers two cartridges, 22LR and the 22 Short. The main change is the breech opening. This area is now significantly reduced in size and only ejects right. We now have the plastic butt plate too!!!! The charging handle is screwed into the bolt and is engaged in the safety notch at the rear of the bolt travel. The tangent sight and stepped barrel also seem to be standard now.


Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-15-2015, 11:32 AM
Lakeside Machine

Join Date: 
Apr 2010
Location: 
Arkansas
Posts: 
266
TPC Rating: 
100% (3)
This next Gevarm brochure is most commonly seen in the US. This is also a "A3" model. But there are some changes to this one. The charging handle is now a floating type that can be drawn to the rear and pushed into the receiver. There is a corresponding hole on the opposite side of the charging handle that will hold the bolt open or in the safe position. Remember, the other safety was a notch cut in the charging handle groove that had the bolt handle turn upward and catch. Another change is the lack of the stepped barrel contour. This is maybe to make it cheaper? Everything else is pretty much becoming standardized. This model has the grooved receiver, tangent/tunnel sights, adjustable trigger, plastic butt plate, small ejection port, aperture compartment in the grip, but still only has the 8 shot magazine.

Oddly enough the 22 short chambering option was dropped in this brochure. I have not seen the 22 short caliber appear in any offerings from this point on.




Last edited by Lakeside Machine; 03-15-2015 at 11:36 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 03-15-2015, 12:40 PM
Lakeside Machine

Join Date: 
Apr 2010
Location: 
Arkansas
Posts: 
266
TPC Rating: 
100% (3)
I'll get back to the A- series rifles in some upcoming posts, but at this time I want to show the later introduced E1 takedown model. The E1 was a slight separation from the A series guns in that it was a takedown version. It also has a new receiver chassis that is made from an aluminum/Zink alloy casting. I presume the costs of producing the "A" series rifles was straining the pocket book as they were priced around 75-80.00 US at the time. Gevelot could speed up production by using castings and also economically swap out the costly tangent sight system for the cost of offering a takedown version. I also presume "takedown" was vogue at that time too. The tangent rear sight and tunnel front sight were omitted in the takedown series except for some special order E2-3 units that never made it to the US, those had the tangent sight systems and threaded muzzles.

The most common E series rifle in the U.S. is the E1. There were other versions after that but they are rare here. The E2 is very similar except it has a wide forearm. Then toward the end of the E2 design a magazine change came and that design followed through the E3 model to the end of the Gevarms life. The biggest attraction the E1 had over the A-series rifles was the production of the elusive 20 round magazine!! Until this time there were no higher capacity magazines offered. There was mention of a 50 round drum (I'll get to that at a later time) but it seems to never have made it to the U.S. in quantity. Unfortunately the new 20 round magazine didn't fit the old A-series rifles. I Suspect the newly designed magazine needed to be wider to accommodate how the rimmed ammo stacked up inside of it mechanically. At least the old A series magazines fit the new E1!!
The mechanical heart and soul of the E1 is essentially the same as the A series rifles. I'll get into the actual details later as we disect each model and photo them side by side. History isn't clear, but I have noticed a trend that once the E series made the appearance, the A series seemed to fade away from that point on.


Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 03-15-2015, 01:07 PM
Lakeside Machine

Join Date: 
Apr 2010
Location: 
Arkansas
Posts: 
266
TPC Rating: 
100% (3)
The next posts will be just some neat changes noticed through the years of some printed materials. I would guess when the American market began to take off, some of the dealers and distributors had to straighten out the translation along the way. Maybe that's how....."Pardon my French" came about?! Hope none of you are getting bored with this stuff??? I will get into hardcore gun pics..don't worry!

These Gevarm flyers are for caring and maintenance suggestions for the rifle. The first one is sort of....well.....an early version. The second is revised with better language.



Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 03-15-2015, 01:22 PM
Lakeside Machine

Join Date: 
Apr 2010
Location: 
Arkansas
Posts: 
266
TPC Rating: 
100% (3)
When a brochure or manual changed from one country to another it had to apparently change format to. Here's a sample of the American (left) and the French (right) takedown and reassembly photos. For some reason the same pictures were not used even though the same procedure was stated in both. Maybe they thought there was a difference in American hands and French hands??



Another neat change that Gevelot/Gevarm had was the demographic of the shooter portrayed within the manuals and flyers. Here's a sample of the target audience they planned on attracting. The left image is the early French brochure. The right is the early American flyer and the middle is the American version!

Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 03-15-2015, 01:36 PM
Lakeside Machine

Join Date: 
Apr 2010
Location: 
Arkansas
Posts: 
266
TPC Rating: 
100% (3)
I have one more series of pictures involving paperwork. It is the most complete brochure/book I found on the models. Soon I will get into the pictures of the actual items.
As far as advertising done in the US, I haven't found much in any remarkable variations. There seems to be the same consistent artwork for the ads, they just may vary in size a bit. I have found one Gevarm ad that is a full page in size on the back of "Guns" magazine in March 1957. The importer at that time was Tradewinds, Inc., of Tacoma, Washington. The rifle portrayed is an early A3 version.


Last edited by Lakeside Machine; 03-15-2015 at 02:54 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 03-15-2015, 02:29 PM
obx22's Avatar
obx22

Join Date: 
Mar 2002
Location: 
Dare County N.C.
Posts: 
3,145
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
So I guess mine is an A2:







Fun rifle!
Accuracy is, unbelievable. Factor in that is fires from an open bolt, with the obvious slower lock time and shift in center of gravity and it borders on incredible.
Mine cycles CBs which makes it super fun!

Last edited by obx22; 03-21-2015 at 03:56 PM. Reason: Errors.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:07 AM.

Privacy Policy

DMCA Notice

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2000-2018 RimfireCentral.com
x