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  #16  
Old 01-13-2017, 05:40 AM
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Question. Can the hammer be removed and replaced by drifting one pin?
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  #17  
Old 01-13-2017, 07:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThunderStick View Post
Question. Can the hammer be removed and replaced by drifting one pin?
Technically, yes, one pin holds the hammer in place.

But, you must first remove the carrier spacer if you want to remove the hammer from the top.

Or, the sear must be removed first if you want to remove the hammer from the bottom.
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  #18  
Old 01-13-2017, 08:08 AM
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Originally Posted by ThunderStick View Post
If im doing it, I'm going to take that positive angle on the HAMMER down to very near zero. The catch is that if you go to far it will be very dangerous! I would not mess with the sear angle because it's depended on for the half cock "safety".

Your pictures make me want to do my trigger! PS I use diamond files on my triggers to keep everything square, paper tends to round things. Just my 2 cents.
I agree, a neutral camber would be ideal.
I don't have the tools to do that accurately.
So, for this first iteration I will keep the sear and hammer notch angles the same. I did polish the sear notch and hammer notch a bit though.

Last night I reinstalled the sear with a new reduced power (rp) spring, and reinstalled the hammer. I put a little moly on the hammer notch before reassembly. When manually rotating the sear (while in place) I can feel the difference in the rotational force needed to actuate the sear. The factory spring is quite stiff in comparison btw.

Also, I disassembled the trigger and replaced both the sear link spring and trigger spring with rp springs. I had to disassemble/reassemble the trigger a few times until I got the correct spring combination. It is surprising how much finger force is needed to overcome the factory springs in the oem trigger. Finally, I polished the sear link where it contacts the sear.

All of the trigger group pins are splined on the right side, so you must drift the pins from left to right.

I will post some more pictures and hope to complete the rifle assembly by this weekend.
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Last edited by OldWolf; 01-14-2017 at 03:52 PM.
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  #19  
Old 01-16-2017, 09:19 AM
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When disassembling and reassembling the BL-22, make sure that you have the Field Service Manual (FSM) in front of you. It has almost all the information you need to this job successfully. Complete trigger group (TG) tear down is not complicated, just follow the FSM and you will have it quickly done. My advice is to study the action before tear down, and take photos if you have access to a camera. I referred to photos numerous times during the reassembly process. You have already seen my photos of the disassembled TG. The only tools needed for teardown is a large screwdriver to remove the stock, and numerous brass punches to remove the splined pins (the spline is on the right side of the pin, so pins are drifted from left to right). There are important tips in the FSM to stock removal, so read that section before proceeding. Working with the TG is much easier without the stock attached.

Once you have the TG apart, you can decide to polish the sear and hammer hook, or not. I buffed the contact surfaces with a 1500 grit emery paper, but I have my doubt that doing this will have much effect on trigger performance.
With the reduce power (RP) spring kit you get one hammer spring, and numerous smaller springs that can be used for the sear, sear link, and trigger springs.

I used the RP spring that most closely resembled the factory spring for the sear. I could tell that my spring of choice was RP just be compressing it between my fingers. While there were lower power springs in the kit that would fit the sear okay, my rational is that I wanted to be sure the spring I chose had enough compressive energy available to successfully engage the half cock safety in case of a thumb slip, etc. You might choose to experiment with some of the lower powered springs available in the kit.

For the two trigger springs in the cocking lever, I chose two lightweight ones that “felt” right to me. Yes, it is that subjective. Trial and error. In fact the first springs I put in I knew where too heavy and not that much improved over the factory springs. It is surprising how stiff the factory springs really are. I wish I had measured the trigger pull with the lever down so that I could have some comparative data. By the way, the trigger and sear link easily come out of the lever after removing the two pins. It is easy to reassemble too.

Putting the TG back together is generally straight forward, except for one step that gave me a little difficulty. The hammer spring. Apparently, Browning has a tool available that makes this a simpler process, but most gunsmiths do not have it I guess, so they do explain in the FSM an alternate installation method, which most of us will use. Unless you have your TG in front of you, or able to visualize my upcoming explanation from earlier photos, explaining this will be difficult. Basically, once you have the sear, sear spring, and hammer installed, which is not difficult, you then must install the hammer spring from the top. But to do this, you have to let the hammer over rotate so that you can pop the mainspring follower into its recess in the cocking lever. If you over rotate the hammer too much, the sear spring falls out, and you must start over by removing the hammer, installing the sear spring (the sear stays installed), and putting the hammer back in. I found this not to be so easy, and had to repeat this step probably five times until I had success. It occurred to me that I could build a TOOL to make this step a bit easier and I show a picture of it below.

Once the hammer spring is in place, finishing up the TG reassembly is a piece of cake.


This is just to remind you of how the parts look in the TG.




The upper hammer strut hangs loose in the TG until assembled.




You can see the RP sear spring and sear.




Just another view of the hammer in the empty TG housing.




Yay!! Hammer spring installed. The carrier spring is hanging loose on its pin at this point. You can see that I learned to leave the splined pins slightly out until I was sure I had finished final assembly.




The carrier, carrier spring and carrier spacer installed.



The cocking lever link pin will eventually fit into the bolt locking block.


Here is the tool that helped me a lot. I drilled a small hole in a plastic punch so that I could compress the hammer spring and strut to fit into the cocking lever recess.



Done! Ready to install.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 20170113_214154.jpg (223.5 KB, 10 views)
File Type: jpg 20170113_214218.jpg (212.7 KB, 8 views)
File Type: jpg 20170113_214043.jpg (214.2 KB, 5 views)
File Type: jpg 20170114_162327.jpg (316.3 KB, 6 views)
File Type: jpg 20170114_162805.jpg (295.1 KB, 7 views)
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Last edited by OldWolf; 07-31-2017 at 03:24 PM. Reason: Clarification
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  #20  
Old 01-16-2017, 09:52 AM
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Now it is time to reassemble the rifle and then take some trigger pull measurements.

Pictures can tell a lot for this step.


Here are the major components, ready to be reassembled.


This is the proper orientation of the locking block and cover plate.


Linkage when lever is in full down position, the locking block is fully retracted.


Cocking lever is fully closed and locking block is in the locked position.
(This is how the the assembly will look before being slid into the receiver, however before doing so, lower the lever just enough to fully unlock the locking block).



A better view of the locking block in the locked position.


This is the correct orientation of the locking block in the bolt recess.


The ejector spring is easily placed in its recess with fingers or small needle nose pliers.


Ejector and spring in correct position before final assembly.



I realized I missed a good photo opportunity here. I should have taken a photo of the TG/Bolt assembly halfway inserted into the receiver. Maybe next time. You must slide the TG with bolt in position, with the bolt block just in the earliest unlocked position of its stroke (see earlier photo above) into the receiver while using a small finger to hold the ejector down (while the ejector spring is compressed). Remember to slide the TG/bolt assembly in at the same angle as the bolt actually cycles while in use. Then the ejector slides right into the proper bolt ejector spacing and you are done. All that is left to do is install the takedown screw.


After assembling, make sure the action operates and cycles as it should as it should. When that part is complete, you are ready to take trigger pull measurements.
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Last edited by OldWolf; 01-16-2017 at 10:30 AM.
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  #21  
Old 01-16-2017, 10:18 AM
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Now to the results. From another thread I posted my preliminary trigger pull data and also some first impressions of my new rifle.
Quote:
I picked up my BL-22 last week, the octagon model, it is quite pretty.

The trigger is crisp, no creep at all, but about 6#. Repetitive trigger pulls did not seem to lighten it.

First 50 pulls, 6.1# ave
2nd 50 pulls, 6.1# ave
3rd 50 pulls, 6.1# ave

Undoubtedly, many hundreds of pulls will be needed to see any change.

I took it apart, not too difficult to do, nor was reassembling it. But I did watch the YouTube video prior to disassembly.

These next few weeks I am going to put a lot of rounds through it, then re-measure the trigger pull.

Even if it falls to 5#, that is too much. So, I am going to order reduced power springs, and perhaps polish a little bit and see where that leads. I am lucky it is creep free at this point I think. The reduced power spring kit seller indicated to me that the 3# range is very doable.

I haven't had a new gun for a long time as my general modus operandi is to locate nice used specimens to add to my collection. My new BL-22 action is stiff, even after disassembly to remove the factory gunk. Usage should alleviate that I hope!

I was a little surprised (and disappointed) to see that the trigger assembly housing is cast aluminum. I guess I was hoping for an all steel Browning (like the good old days!), especially since the lower part of the bolt rides along the aluminum frame. Seems like that would be an area of wear. I suppose my concern is unwarranted since these models have a reputation of durability.

Overall, I am pleased with the build quality of the rifle, very nice stock and a great bluing job. If I can get the trigger pull lowered to an acceptable value, I will proceed to the accuracy testing period of the rifle. Initial testing with the open sights and cheap Thunderbolt bulk ammunition was showing a nice pattern developing. I was standing in the typical Silhouette shooting stance for most of my initial shooting test, about 200 rounds.

Once I get the spring reducing kit, I will attempt to photograph the installation and take trigger pull data at the end.
After cycling the trigger 5 to 10 times I took 14 measurements. Here is the summary data, I can post the individual data points later if someone is interested.

Units are pounds.
N=14, Mean=3.313, Std=0.199

Now, discarding the highest and lowest readings:
N=12, Mean=3.292, Std=0.094

After taking these reading yesterday, I went to the range and fired 250 rounds through my rifle. There was still no creep, and the release felt much lighter (and enjoyable) as you would expect. It took me awhile to get used to the light trigger take-up (from the two RP trigger spring I installed). I have not yet taken any new trigger pull data, but I expect the trigger will marginally improve (get lighter) as I use the rifle and wear it in, so to speak.

So, I would have to say that a reduce power spring kit will result in a lighter trigger pull. In my case, it reduced the pull from 6.1 pounds to 3.3 pounds, with no discernible creep. Your results will no doubt vary from mine.
Good Luck!

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Last edited by OldWolf; 07-07-2019 at 04:33 PM. Reason: Clarification
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  #22  
Old 01-16-2017, 10:38 AM
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I'm sorry, I am not adding much value to this thread other than to be a cheerleader. This is one of the most informative threads, excellent pictures and detailed descriptions, that I have ever seen in a forum! This is a classic example of what makes RFC such a popular forum.
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  #23  
Old 01-16-2017, 11:10 AM
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So you have lighter pull, still no creep, but now the trigger has take-up? Just making sure I understand. BTW...thanks for posting this. Does it feel like the lock time is any slower because of the lighter hammer spring?
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  #24  
Old 01-16-2017, 07:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big-Dummy View Post
So you have lighter pull, still no creep, but now the trigger has take-up? Just making sure I understand. BTW...thanks for posting this. Does it feel like the lock time is any slower because of the lighter hammer spring?
I cannot tell any difference in lock time. As to the take-up, the geometry and design of the trigger allows for slight trigger movement until the sear link contacts the sear. Prior to RP springs, the take-up was very heavy, now I hardly have to apply pressure until I feel the sear link touch the sear.

The attached gif shows what I am talking about.
-The sear link is fully down when the trigger is untouched.
-As you press the trigger, the trigger moves as the roll pin moves up in the larger diameter hole that it is housed in.
-When the roll pin contacts the top of the larger opening, the sear link begins to pivot to disconnect the sear form the hammer.
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File Type: gif BL22TriggerStages.gif (185.5 KB, 333 views)
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  #25  
Old 01-16-2017, 09:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OldWolf View Post
I cannot tell any difference in lock time. As to the take-up, the geometry and design of the trigger allows for slight trigger movement until the sear link contacts the sear. Prior to RP springs, the take-up was very heavy, now I hardly have to apply pressure until I feel the sear link touch the sear.

The attached gif shows what I am talking about.
-The sear link is fully down when the trigger is untouched.
-As you press the trigger, the trigger moves as the roll pin moves up in the larger diameter hole that it is housed in.
-When the roll pin contacts the top of the larger opening, the sear link begins to pivot to disconnect the sear form the hammer.
Acts similar to a two-stage trigger
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  #26  
Old 01-17-2017, 06:01 AM
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Is the BL Service Manual available on-line? It would be very beneficial to every BL-22 aficionado.
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  #27  
Old 01-17-2017, 07:22 AM
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Yes, there is a link in the Stickies.

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
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Old 01-17-2017, 12:38 PM
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Thanks, had not noticed I before.


This morning while paging through gunbroker I saw a bl-22 schematic drawing and what I thought at the time complete disassembly/ assembly instructions. So I jumped on it before I had fully woken up. I received paypal invoice from seller few minutes later stateing is was complete 2 page magazine article. What I thought? Sure enough magazine article, my bad. Oh well, it was only 9.00 bucks. Guess I need to make a rule for myself. No buying until noon. I should be coherent by then.
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  #29  
Old 01-17-2017, 01:04 PM
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Here's OldWolfs link to the service manual from the sticky

http://www.sealnet.com/bl22fieldserv...viceManual.pdf

Thanks OldWolf! Your pictorial here is very informative and I'm printing the SM right now.

Frank
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  #30  
Old 01-18-2017, 10:37 AM
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When I reassemble my BL22, my biggest problem is getting the sear spring to remain in place.
Any tips to hold the sear spring in place during reassembly are appreciated?

Thanks
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