Using epoxy to permanently install fasteners - RimfireCentral.com Forums

Go Back   RimfireCentral.com Forums > >

Join Team RFC to remove these ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-27-2014, 02:30 PM
Alecbh

Join Date: 
Feb 2010
Location: 
Texas
Posts: 
1,611
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
Using epoxy to permanently install fasteners



Log in to see fewer ads
I have a project which requires modifying a stock to fit on a different rifle than originally intended. I've settled on the new method of attachment: a bolt through a hole in the rear of the receiver that will thread into a nut permanently installed in the stock. My quandry is how best to install this nut/threaded insert. So far my thoughts have been to drill a slightly undersized hole, press the nut in and epoxy it in place, after dimpling the area around it to achieve a mechanical lock. This will be the only point of attachment, so it needs to be strong. I'm not sure what epoxy would be best for this. I see most people using Acraglas to bed stocks, but I would prefer to stick to something I can get at a local hardware store. Any thoughts and advice are welcome and encouraged.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-27-2014, 03:01 PM
Szumi's Avatar
Szumi is online now
US Marines NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Jun 2011
Location: 
Between Hell and Paradise
Posts: 
1,522
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
Are you going to be using a nut, as in a hex nut, or a threaded pillar? I'm trying to see what it is you are describing.
__________________

If you like your Constitution, you can keep your Constitution.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-27-2014, 09:11 PM
Alecbh

Join Date: 
Feb 2010
Location: 
Texas
Posts: 
1,611
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Szumi View Post
Are you going to be using a nut, as in a hex nut, or a threaded pillar? I'm trying to see what it is you are describing.
My verbal description skills are lacking, I know. It will be a basic hex nut, pushed to the bottom of a drilled hole. I need to figure out the best epoxy to permanently secure that hex nut in the bottom of that hole.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #4  
Old 09-27-2014, 10:30 PM
srtolly's Avatar
srtolly
US Marines Veteran NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Jan 2013
Location: 
Southern Minnesota
Posts: 
89
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
I've used JB Weld with good success.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-27-2014, 10:50 PM
ivan

Join Date: 
Aug 2008
Posts: 
6,300
TPC Rating: 
100% (6)
Quote:
Originally Posted by srtolly View Post
I've used JB Weld with good success.
Yup, that is what "some of us" here on RFC use to bed pillars in for a 10/22, etc.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-27-2014, 10:58 PM
srtolly's Avatar
srtolly
US Marines Veteran NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Jan 2013
Location: 
Southern Minnesota
Posts: 
89
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
I pillar bedded my Mosin with the stuff. Worked pretty well, very solid.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-28-2014, 12:09 PM
CardPuncher's Avatar
CardPuncher
US Air Force Veteran NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Sep 2011
Location: 
Northern Florida
Posts: 
2,126
TPC Rating: 
100% (7)
Don't "starve" the epoxy by not leaving enough room for it when you dimple the wood. Also consider drilling the hole a little deep and gouging the back of the nut so there is something for epoxy to grip.

If there will be much pressure on the nut, consider the compression of the wood. Maybe you want a washer under the nut or use the epoxy to act as a washer.

You can get threaded inserts in steel or brass. They have threads on the outside that screw into an over-size hole in the wood. Then your bolt goes into a threaded hole in the insert. The outside end is slotted so you can screw them in with a screwdriver or special tool. You could cut the end off and polish or blue it. If you do that, pre-thread the wood, then stick a bolt into the insert from the outside end. Have a nut on the bolt and jam it tight against the insert to lock it from turning and put a wrench on the bolt to screw it in.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 09-29-2014, 05:22 PM
Alecbh

Join Date: 
Feb 2010
Location: 
Texas
Posts: 
1,611
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
Excellent. I have JB Weld here already.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CardPuncher View Post
Don't "starve" the epoxy by not leaving enough room for it when you dimple the wood. Also consider drilling the hole a little deep and gouging the back of the nut so there is something for epoxy to grip.

If there will be much pressure on the nut, consider the compression of the wood. Maybe you want a washer under the nut or use the epoxy to act as a washer.
Do you mean to make deep dimples to not "starve" the epoxy? And I will be using the epoxy as a washer,so to speak. It will be on both sides of the nut to hold it in.

Thank you all for your help.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 09-29-2014, 05:34 PM
CardPuncher's Avatar
CardPuncher
US Air Force Veteran NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Sep 2011
Location: 
Northern Florida
Posts: 
2,126
TPC Rating: 
100% (7)
You should look at the mechanical lock between wood and epoxy and epoxy and nut separately. If the epoxy is well-locked and bonded to the wood, the nut will be good. It sounds like you're describing 6 little spots of epoxy on the flats of the nut with the corners of the nut touching the wood. The whole thing could spin.

Unless appearance doesn't matter or you just want to do it this way for the experience I think you should look at a real threaded insert from your local Ace Hardware.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 09-29-2014, 07:15 PM
Alecbh

Join Date: 
Feb 2010
Location: 
Texas
Posts: 
1,611
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
Quote:
Originally Posted by CardPuncher View Post
You should look at the mechanical lock between wood and epoxy and epoxy and nut separately. If the epoxy is well-locked and bonded to the wood, the nut will be good. It sounds like you're describing 6 little spots of epoxy on the flats of the nut with the corners of the nut touching the wood. The whole thing could spin.

Unless appearance doesn't matter or you just want to do it this way for the experience I think you should look at a real threaded insert from your local Ace Hardware.
I take it that a threaded insert will not loosen even with repeated uses? This is a laminated stock, and there's not a lot of material in the area I'm adding this to, which is why I don't want to use wood screws.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 09-29-2014, 07:20 PM
srtolly's Avatar
srtolly
US Marines Veteran NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Jan 2013
Location: 
Southern Minnesota
Posts: 
89
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
I've had threaded inserts loosen up before and used a little JB Weld to keep it in.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 09-29-2014, 07:33 PM
CardPuncher's Avatar
CardPuncher
US Air Force Veteran NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Sep 2011
Location: 
Northern Florida
Posts: 
2,126
TPC Rating: 
100% (7)
The insert should never move in the wood once it's in place, unless you over-stress it. Those things are really solid. Also, the outside threads' diameter is (obviously) greater than the inside threads for the bolt so as you screw the bolt in and out, it's a lot easier for it to turn in its threads than for the insert to turn in the wood.

If it does move, your nut would have moved sooner. If that happens, take it out, rough everything up, and as srtolly says, JB Weld it back in place.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 09-29-2014, 07:40 PM
srtolly's Avatar
srtolly
US Marines Veteran NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Jan 2013
Location: 
Southern Minnesota
Posts: 
89
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
I will add that the ones that did loosen up were from repeated reassembly.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 09-29-2014, 08:16 PM
Alecbh

Join Date: 
Feb 2010
Location: 
Texas
Posts: 
1,611
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
Quote:
Originally Posted by srtolly View Post
I will add that the ones that did loosen up were from repeated reassembly.
Repeated reassembly of the threaded insert into the wood, or repeated use of the inserts internal threads? Thanks for the input.

CardPuncher, I just picked up some inserts. They're a bit long, but I've found that judicious use of an angle grinder cutoff wheel fixes problems like that. I will JB weld it in place after a successful test fit.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 09-29-2014, 08:43 PM
CardPuncher's Avatar
CardPuncher
US Air Force Veteran NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Sep 2011
Location: 
Northern Florida
Posts: 
2,126
TPC Rating: 
100% (7)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alecbh View Post
...They're a bit long, but I've found that judicious use of an angle grinder cutoff wheel fixes problems like that. I will JB weld it in place after a successful test fit.
Sounds like you're good to go. A little JB Weld, an angle grinder and a bigger railroad spike should take care of just about anything.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:11 PM.

Privacy Policy

DMCA Notice

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2022 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2022 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2022 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2000-2018 RimfireCentral.com
x