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  #16  
Old 09-13-2020, 02:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TodG View Post
I've been looking at getting a Victor, and on the two IO looked at, one has the push button and the other had a socket head screw to retain the barrel. I gather the screw version is the 108 series. It there a big difference between the two? I'm looking for a shooter and the screw version is in like-new condition but cheaper than the button barrel Victor.

Help a High Standard rookie out.
My experience level with High Standard's was similar to yours . . . That being a High Standard Rookie". My "first" Victor was a very nice looking model and I overpaid for sure. As after the purchase . . . I did a lot of research and found out my particular model was put together from parts and pieces at a factory that was closing down . . . and then one has to include the fact it was previously owned so who knows what modifications were made, and/or parts & pieces swapped when the owner decided to sell it. As it turned out mine was one of the East Hartford - prefix "SH" & suffix "V" serial numbered Victors with the take-down screw. The slide had some issues so it was impossible to replace the return spring . . . the barrel throat was "reamed" out in an attempt to fix feeding problems, the top of the barrel under the rail was certainly "hammer-forged", and the magazines provided were pieces of junk.

The good news is Alan Aronstein and the staff at Interarms came to my rescue and replaced and fitted their X-Series barrel & slide on my frame and now I have a great shooting Victor. I also bought a couple of their magazines . . . worth every penny. I was taught a High Standard Victor lesson at a high price.

Obviously - Your Mileage May Vary . . . as I think there are good East Hartford - SHxxxxx models out there. Mine turned out as a "Good Example of a Bad Example" or "How Not to Buy a High Standard Victor".

My recommendation is to carefully look over any East Hartford SHxxxx Victor before purchasing and I feel they should be much lower priced than a Hamden Victor in similar condition. Note I recently purchased a Hamden "Victor" at a significantly lower price which, functions very well without any modifications (yes - I replaced the slide springs). . . . The push-button take-down needed a bit of cleaning & lube but now works well.

I wish you the best with your Victor acquisition.
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  #17  
Old 09-13-2020, 03:53 PM
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My knowledge of High Standard pistols is years below SVG and LDBennett, but I do have a small amount of experience w/these fine pistols. I currently have four (all Victors) ranging from an early ’73 (steel vented rib) to an early December ’81 SH gun. All four shoot well, no issues w/one exception. The SH gun shoots great until it hits about 175 rounds, then it jams. I Know right away it’s time to tighten the allen screw.
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  #18  
Old 09-13-2020, 05:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brett Mc View Post
My knowledge of High Standard pistols is years below SVG and LDBennett, but I do have a small amount of experience w/these fine pistols. I currently have four (all Victors) ranging from an early ’73 (steel vented rib) to an early December ’81 SH gun. All four shoot well, no issues w/one exception. The SH gun shoots great until it hits about 175 rounds, then it jams. I Know right away it’s time to tighten the allen screw.
Does your SH Victor have the high collar lock washer? It shouldn't loosen with a lock washer.

I have 24 or 25 Victors from a February 1971 through a 107 series SH V. Three are Sh serial numbers. A regular 108, a 107 and a 108 10-X with the ribbed barrel. 8 of the Victors are 104 series Victors All have worked just fine.
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  #19  
Old 09-13-2020, 07:18 PM
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Lock Washer

We are going to have a VERY happy SH "V" Victor customer on Monday Morning. The only Barrel fit problem was a MISSING Lock Washer. I think that the washer might stick in the frame when the screw is removed. It then falls out and causes the problem. I have also seen the SHCS Pistols with a shorter screw and, they just loosen up. The answer is the correct length screw and the lock washer. - Alan Aronstein
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  #20  
Old 09-14-2020, 06:53 AM
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John:

I think as in housing where "comp's" drive the pricing of housing to the moon, when a seller sees what someone else got for a gun, they boost their asking price. If the demand is there then the pricing escalates over time. It only takes a few high sale priced guns to start the escalation.

Hi Std's are great Target guns. But as used guns (none younger than about 30 years) should they match the pricing of a brand new S&W Model 41 for which you can still get parts and service? I really don't know exactly what drives the pricing but collectors who will pay such high pricing does impact the pricing and availability. How many "collectors" only have just one Hi Std pistol? The number of collectors is not a good measure of demand as many have multiple safes full of them, all removed from the availability to those of us that want to shoot them.

I come from the camera collectors world. I know the game as I saw it in action for years. I collected about 40 cameras and I too took a few excellent cameras off the market place by storing them in display cabinets. But in defense of my "collecting", few regular people today want film cameras to use on a regular basis. Guns are different. They are tools that can work well for centuries. My point is by collecting and chasing certain models of guns, the pricing gets elevated. If there would be no collectors of Hi Std guns what would the pricing be? I doubt it would be anywhere near what it is today. That is what I mean by "collectors control the pricing".

Obviously this is only my opinion and yours definitely differs and that is fine. I'd be really surprised if you didn't defend collecting Hi Std guns. My camera collecting was not for profit but a desire to own great cameras not financially available to me when the cameras were new. Film cameras have had a useful life and it is now over as film and processing is difficult to find and expensive. Beyond collectors, they have little value. But try and buy a Leica or Nikon...it will empty your wallet fast. So, again, camera collectors control the pricing.

LDBennett
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  #21  
Old 09-14-2020, 07:58 AM
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To your question my father-in-law and I both had a number of High Standards with me preferring the Victors. We always passed on the guns with the screw instead of the pushbutton as we had had early on the problem of the screw loosening up as you shot it while the pushbutton actually tightens up a bit. If I had known it was just an issue of a short screw as Alan has said I may have tried them more. Now I have it in my head the gun doesn't look right without that button sticking out.
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  #22  
Old 09-14-2020, 12:40 PM
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Thanks for all the help. I'm going to take my time and look for the right High Standard and do some research in the mean time.

I just picked up a nice Hammerli 215, so I'll have to wait a while.
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  #23  
Old 09-15-2020, 06:04 AM
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Just stay away from screw takedown models. ML serialized guns are a bargain. Condition is a good indicator of wear so pay more for little used ones. Buy a Connecticut made gun or the newest clone available through Interarms Texas (Alan Aronstein). Check for the frame crack. Avoid modified guns.

Have trouble with feeding? Go to CCI Std Vel ammo. Use Interarmstx.com latest magazines.

LDBennett
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  #24  
Old 09-15-2020, 07:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LDBennett View Post
John:
... My camera collecting was not for profit but a desire to own great cameras not financially available to me when the cameras were new. Film cameras have had a useful life and it is now over as film and processing is difficult to find and expensive. Beyond collectors, they have little value. But try and buy a Leica or Nikon...it will empty your wallet fast. So, again, camera collectors control the pricing.

LDBennett
I have had a lot of cameras over the years but they were tools to me not collectibles. Sizes ranged from the Minox B that utilized 9.2mm film casettes through the Linhof Technika that used 4' x 5" sheet film. I have had a number of darkrooms as well and still have a full function darkroom that has become a gun parts and accessory storage room. I now use a Canon 5Ds r 50 Mega pixel body with a range of lenses. I use a HP Designjet Z printer instead of a wet darkroom. I still have the Linhof for 4x5 black and white work but seldom use it.

Leica's were a big collectible when I was a youth and have gotten even worse but then a lot of things have. My initial collecting experience was in coin collecting but I sold that collection in 2008 through Heritage Auctions over a period of nearly a year. The appreciation of the more rare coins was amazing even after taxes which are 28% on collectibles. In coins it is all collectors. They have comparatively little utility at the elevated market value.
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  #25  
Old 09-16-2020, 07:54 AM
LDBennett
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John:

I too have used many different cameras over the years in my pursuit of artsy photography. In college I worked in a camera store and shot sports pictures for the local newspaper. I shot sports pictures for my college as well. Over the years I used a Speed Graphic, a Pentax, a Leica M3, a Hassselblad 500C, and a Mamiya 645. Along the way I had several Pentax 35's, a couple Rollei 6x6, and a few other cameras. Today I have collected for display Leicas, Canon, Rollei, Kodak Retinas and Bantums, a Speed Graphic, several different mini cameras and others. I collect them as cameras I wanted in the years but could not buy due to no finances and life outside of hobbies. I never have "collected" anything to sell for a profit. It all goes to the heirs when I'm gone to do with it as they please.

I have had 4 darkrooms over the years...BUT. After using a DSLR and a version of Photoshop, I abandon my last darkroom and gave the enlarger and all the darkroom equipment to the local junior college. I can do so much more in Photoshop in less time than I could in a stinking darkroom. I shot pictures with the goal of larger prints to display around the house. I recently bought a Koni-Omega Rapid 6x7 for display but I could not resist testing it with film. I found a California based company that develops the film then scans it, all for $20 a roll of 120. The Kodak B&W film was about $8 a roll. Seems that film photography is not cheap to do anymore and finding the film and the processors is tough.

As for the grip angle of Olympic style guns, I have been told (and I confirm) that there is a natural stop to the droop of the hand when held vertically. If I allow my hand to reach that natural point then my grip is at the same angle as most of those Olympic guns and the slant grip Hi Std's. Indeed, the Military grip was designed to match that of the 1911 which at the time was the "military" pistol...hence the name. As I understand it, the name was not to designate that the military owned or bought the guns. (Obviously they did buy some Hi Std's over time). As you said the Military grip angle was for those three gun matches where they had to shoot a large caliber (usually a 45ACP 1911), a medium caliber (Colt and S&W semi-autos modified to shoot 38Special wad cutters), and a 22LR pistol. Anyway I just wanted to expand why there was a Military grip for Hi Std's for those who don't know the history. And I enjoy your posts when you straighten out the history and educate me as to Hi Std details.

I too am waiting for your book!

LDBennett
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