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  #1  
Old 07-02-2020, 05:43 PM
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BX Trigger polishing



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I have a BX trigger assembly installed in my build. I didn't bother to do anything to it other than cleaning and lubricating when I installed it. I didn't even look that close at any of the contact surfaces to see what condition they were in.

Anyone have any reason to believe that you could gain performance by doing a little polishing?
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Old 07-02-2020, 08:40 PM
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Sure. I trim the springs a couple coils.
Then install a over travel set screw in the trigger shoe.


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Old 07-03-2020, 01:09 AM
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I lost 4-8 oz depends by polishing very light stoning my bx triggers. One was already smooth. One lost some grittyness and improved overall feel. These are still mass produced cast parts. So your experience may vary depending on if your particular trigger group might benefit from it.

One group i also shimmed with a thin washer too improve trigger feel. Too much slop. Depends how poorly the tolerances stack
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Old 07-03-2020, 06:38 AM
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When you trim a spring you completely change the rate and strength of that spring. Unless you have a very good spring tester you will have;

light strikes
Inconsistent ignition
And in inconsistent pull.

Either have a pro re work the trigger or leave it alone
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Old 07-03-2020, 09:52 AM
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Check my sticky at the top of this page, it's got some good tips.
https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forum...d.php?t=544227
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Old 07-04-2020, 03:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dvang View Post
I lost 4-8 oz depends by polishing very light stoning my bx triggers. One was already smooth. One lost some grittyness and improved overall feel. These are still mass produced cast parts. So your experience may vary depending on if your particular trigger group might benefit from it.

One group i also shimmed with a thin washer too improve trigger feel. Too much slop. Depends how poorly the tolerances stack
Thanks. This is what I figured the assy was built like.
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Old 07-05-2020, 12:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlysAlot View Post
When you trim a spring you completely change the rate and strength of that spring. Unless you have a very good spring tester you will have;

light strikes
Inconsistent ignition
And in inconsistent pull.

Either have a pro re work the trigger or leave it alone

Can you explain trimming the plunger spring and trigger sear spring creates light strikes and inconsistent ignition? No one in there right mind would trim the hammer spring.
Not that I know of.
Cheers


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Old 07-05-2020, 01:06 PM
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Originally Posted by RCP Phx View Post
Check my sticky at the top of this page, it's got some good tips.
https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forum...d.php?t=544227
Best 18 minute instructional video I have seen on anything Ruger. Great camera work and the explainations of the trigger workings and why you polished what you did is inspiring.

Great confidence builder for rookies like myself!
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Old 07-08-2020, 07:58 AM
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I took a quick look at the video and lost interest quickly when I saw the Dremel. I simply would prefer to go with small abrasive stones, trusting them to keep flatter, straighter surfaces than a round Dremel wheel. I did take a chance on a Dremel and used a hard felt wheel and some fine compound and polished the sear on the striker surfaces on a Sig P365 handgun and it worked fine, any time you can get those sear engaging surfaces to a mirror polish it will help. The main thing is not to change angles so that the sear has to lift the hammer before it disengages or reduce engagement surface so it becomes unsafe.
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Old 07-08-2020, 11:39 AM
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Two videos for trigger "creep" remedy

I made these videos a few months ago, and sent links to Chaser. This method of cutting down on trigger "creep" has worked for me for years. You might wish to try it. Please excuse the poor quality, fumbling, bumbling. I may have imbibed a bit!

https://youtu.be/DnUL_KaeeIE

https://youtu.be/KIeodTK0LjY
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Old 07-08-2020, 02:36 PM
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Looks simple enough and doesn't cost anything. Good work Gunsmither!
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Old 07-08-2020, 02:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jkingrph
I took a quick look at the video and lost interest quickly when I saw the Dremel. I simply would prefer to go with small abrasive stones, trusting them to keep flatter, straighter surfaces than a round Dremel wheel.
I don't see any dremel work in the RCP Phx video. Perhaps you're referring to the MCARBO video that comes up in the "play next" list?

I think the dremel polishing in that video was fine for the sides, bottom, front, etc; but I agree with you that it's a poor idea to use a dremel for polishing the hammer notch and sear working face. For these edges, I use a jig with increasingly fine abrasives on a machined straight edge. It only takes a little longer than using a dremel, but I know my edges and working surfaces will be square and even when finished.


Quote:
Originally Posted by gunsmither
I made these videos a few months ago, and sent links to Chaser. This method of cutting down on trigger "creep" has worked for me for years.
Creep is how far the trigger has to move between the sear starting to move, and when the hammer releases. That's a function of how much overlap there is between the hammer and sear working surfaces. I don't see your method as reducing this overlap.

What I think your method actually does is it reduces "perceived creep" by forcing some rounding of the hammer notch edge and/or sear working surface edge. Isn't this exactly how a "roll trigger" is formed? It basically reduces the hammer/sear engagement angle as the pull progresses thru the creep. This makes the release very, very smooth (as opposed to crisp "like breaking glass"). But it doesn't really decrease how far the trigger moves before the hammer is released.

I've used a roll trigger interface and found it pleasant to shoot. But my personal preference is still a crisp release where creep is removed by stoning the sear/hammer interface to around .015" overlap. Just a "hint" of creep left, while retaining complete reliability. YMMV.
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Old 07-08-2020, 02:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gunsmither View Post
I made these videos a few months ago, and sent links to Chaser. This method of cutting down on trigger "creep" has worked for me for years. You might wish to try it. Please excuse the poor quality, fumbling, bumbling. I may have imbibed a bit!

https://youtu.be/DnUL_KaeeIE

https://youtu.be/KIeodTK0LjY
imbibed =

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Old 07-08-2020, 03:57 PM
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Burnishing the parts together?

The vids I linked, if the procedure is followed, will give the average shooter a much better feeling trigger, without messing with stones in many cases.

I think what most people want is a nice, smooth, safe trigger pull. This method will help do that in most cases in my experience.

Don't ever do this with a Smith and Wesson, or older Colts double action. You'll likely ruin the very shallow hammer sear notches pronto.
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  #15  
Old 07-10-2020, 01:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Test_Engineer View Post

my personal preference is still a crisp release where creep is removed by stoning the sear/hammer interface to around .015" overlap. Just a "hint" of creep left, while retaining complete reliability. YMMV.
Hmmm, .015? I had to pull out my calipers and get a visual on that number.
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