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  #31  
Old 01-08-2016, 10:26 PM
walt464

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New barrel installed, trigger work done



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Easily the hairiest job like this I've done, but the 10/22 'standard' SS barrel has been adapted to TD service and the shank is 0.499 diameter -- very snug fit. With the fit this close use of an anti-galling grease is necessary and the gun should be disassembled regularly. (Galling -- soft metals rubbed together can effectively weld.)

Obviously Ruger couldn't sell them like that -- hence the 0.497 diameter (0.003 clearance) of my original barrel shank.

It looks to me like Ruger makes their TD barrels from 'standard' ones just as I did: There is a milled cut on the TD barrel that has no function there but is present on the standard. So except that the flats on mine were done with a file you really can't tell the difference in looks. The trickiest cut was already there -- I had to do a couple more, turn down the shank, and drill/tap for the 'block' that holds the front handguard and latch.

One issue is setting up the lathe so the new shank is aligned with the bore; when I put the laser in the new barrel the scope was just three clicks off. It'll probably be more than that at the range (due to barrel vibration -- there's always some) but should be on the paper.

The hairiest part of the job was drilling the holes in the barrel for the block: Go too far and you have a hole in your bore. I used a stop on the drill but as often as I make mistakes ...

One dumb mistake was the screws that hold the block on are 8-32, not 8-40 as commonly used in gunsmithing applications. So after ordering the 8-40 taps, the original screws didn't fit and I had to make new screws. Doh!

The one thing that came out wrong was one of the new cuts that I filed is at slightly the wrong angle so the locking plunger hangs up when you start to put on the barrel. Lifting the plunger (as to remove it) makes it go together fine and it winds up in exactly the right place. I should have measured that angle.

About 20 hours work altogether. A gunsmith would do it in half or less.

The second pass at the trigger was:

1. Reduce the travel a bit more by grinding the point on the hammer. The reduction isn't great -- about half the way to the ridge on one face of the hammer.

2. Replaced the original 0.123" trigger pin with one about 0.127. The hole in the disconnector is even larger than that and the new pin is close in the (plastic) trigger and a light push fit in the trigger guard assembly.

3. Shimmed 0.015 on each side of the disconnector.

4. Cut off a couple of coils on the trigger plunger spring.

It turns out that a lot of the long travel and 'grit' of the factory trigger is due to the trigger and disconnector squirming as you start the pull: They cock sideways to a different angle before the disconnector actually moves on the sear. So removing clearances by using a larger pin and shims eliminates a lot of travel.

There are kits of shims that are pretty cheap and they'd certainly be worthwhile -- or you can make your own if you have a few beer cans, pie plates, etc. The pin is more trouble: I cut down a 0.150" nail in the lathe. Volquartsen sells a complete kit of trigger internals but that's $125 and I don't see that you'd get a much better trigger than the above will give. The break is now absolutely clean at about 4# I think.

Shooting's the acid test; since winter's here I don't know when that will happen but I'll report.

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  #32  
Old 01-10-2016, 08:06 PM
walt464

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Odds and ends

I did get a chance to shoot a few rounds at 25Y today; function was flawless. The new barrel seems to be okay. Three in one hole and two more almost touching: 3/8" group but my position was awkward, light was poor, and my eyes already tired so that's pretty good.

Interestingly, though the windage was basically unchanged, the elevation had to be wound down a few turns of the knob. Better than up I guess -- with a .22 one is much more likely to want extra elevation than the other direction.

I stumbled across this web page yesterday:

http://www.gunblast.com/Ruger-1022TD.htm

That's a well-known reviewer's take on the TD back when it was new. While I suspect that manufacturers furnish 'best of ten' rifles for testing it does tell us what a TD is capable of. There's also a table of ammo and group sizes, plus a test of the effect of taking down the rifle and reassembling it while shooting. EXCELLENT dope.

Looking at that table I see that I need to order a couple more brands of ammo.

The refurbed trigger on my rifle is EXCELLENT. It's not quite 'target grade' but it's first rate for an accurate field rifle. There really is no perceptible overtravel or creep. If you can make or find an oversize trigger pin and are handy enough to make shims from metal scraps and grind a bit off the nose of the hammer and two coils from the trigger plunger spring I'd give it a try before paying for anything.

There are U-Tube videos on trigger group disassembly/assembly: It's not hard but it gets a lot easier with the video.
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  #33  
Old 01-15-2016, 06:55 AM
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It works

Got to the range a couple of times. WINDY -- Pretty bad the first time but much better the second. Having changed everything in the process of installing the new barrel I had a whole new set of stupid problems (loose screws, etc.) to sort through but ended with one group on the second day of 13/32". That was with Lapua SK but I didn't try the Eley Tenex (previous best) after tightening things up.

The best ammo for a rifle is a combination of quality (that's mostly uniformity) and fine details of rifle structure. Changing barrel mounting, tightening screws, etc. can not only change the size of the group but which ammo gives the smallest group. You can't just pick the best and then do a bunch of stuff to the rifle with confidence that you still have the best ammo for that rifle.

I once put on a different model scope and the optimum load (centerfire gun) changed by several tenths of a grain. Then I discovered a slight 'give' (factory defect) in the scope base, fixed it, and the best load changed again. Ammo and time are saved if big changes are all made as soon as you've confirmed that the rifle doesn't need to go back to Mama Ruger.

Back at the ranch I went through the whole barrel assembly again, put JB Weld under the block and got those screws good and tight -- not quite ready to Loctite that. I'll do JB Weld under the Picatinny scope rail AND Loctite those screws. No trouble with those this time but if not glued they ALWAYS come loose.

Also the barrel adjusting knob wasn't tight enough. The mating surfaces are all new-cut and not all are perfectly finished: They will polish and work-harden for a few dozen TD cycles so the knob should be checked regularly.

But barely over 3/8" is good enough for this stage, especially since my sight picture and eyes are at least 1/8" of it. The much crisper trigger helps a lot but it's still too heavy and this isn't just a matter of the plunger spring: Like most such rifles the sear has to slightly lift the hammer as the trigger is pulled (safety feature) so the hammer spring is a substantial part of the trigger pull. Extreme pressure grease will help and a few hundred rounds of shooting will also improve things. We'll see -- VQ sells a target hammer that might be worthwhile.

Other than the volume of stupid stuff -- which really is no worse than usual -- I'm very satisfied so far.

Farther down the road I will consider headspace reduction -- it's 0.046" now with recommendation 0.043". This controls where the cartridge winds up in the chamber which affects both pressure and how much jump the bullet has into the rifling. These are fine points but with groups under 1/2" and good ammo they matter.

It would be possible for the true fanatic to adapt any barrel made for the standard 10/22 in this way. You could collect the whole set, probably fairly cheaply since good 'standard' barrels are available as take outs when someone installed an aftermarket barrel. Well ... cheaply if you don't consider the several hours of fussy machine and hand work to do the adaptation.

Standard modern rifle barrels are so good that I don't see custom barrels being worthwhile for accuracy's sake except for benchrest and perhaps Olympic-level prone target shooting.
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  #34  
Old 01-16-2016, 12:43 PM
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I just put tech sights on mine. I put it in a tapco stock everything else is stock. Here is my third group with the tech sights. First two were for adjustments. This is 25 yds standing freehand. If I can figure out how to add a pic here

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  #35  
Old 01-16-2016, 12:44 PM
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I just put tech sights on mine. I put it in a tapco stock everything else is stock. Here is my third group with the tech sights. First two were for adjustments. This is 25 yds standing freehand. If I can figure out how to add a pic here

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  #36  
Old 01-16-2016, 12:46 PM
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10 shot group. 1 inch dot on paper plate

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  #37  
Old 01-16-2016, 12:57 PM
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Nice freehand shooting!
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  #38  
Old 01-21-2016, 06:49 PM
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Nice freehand shooting!
"Nice?" How 'bout "Bleeping amazing"? Congrats ...

At the range again today -- last time for perhaps 10 days or more since we're right in the center of the area where up to 2' of snow is expected tonight through Sat. Excellent conditions today, though -- Sunny, only slight breeze, 40 degrees and nobody else there making it easier to concentrate. All shooting at 50Y.

I had several new boxes of ammo to try: The best was Remington Eley Club: I shot two groups with that: One was 7/16" x 1/4" and the other 9/16 x 1/16". Both were long axis vertical and the same was true of several other (larger) groups.

This is GOOD progress. The narrowest repeatable dimension of a group -- that's what the barrel and ammo can do, because problems in those places show up as random errors -- up, down, left, right ... whatever.

This looks like vertical vibration of the barrel. A range session with that same ammo devoted to changing the tightness of the forearm screw and perhaps adding damping would be good. That the barrel and ammo are capable of putting them all in one hole doesn't mean that a particular shooter can tune that rifle to do it, but ... maybe.

These are AMAZING barrels. When I was a boy, ordinary people couldn't afford target rifles with barrels equal to this one.

I did shoot a group with CCI Blazer which some tests have claimed to be very good: 1-5/8" x 3/8", vertical. If you throw out the worst shot there are four in 3/4" x 3/8". This ammo does not have near the uniform MV of the Eley: It's possible that the apparent flyer was just a round that hit exactly the worst MV to cause barrel vibration.

That's why I shoot the best ammo possible for testing: The groups are simpler because of the uniformity so you're better able to sort out possible causes.

You can actually buy Eley Tenex by lot number/muzzle velocity from some (especially high priced!) sellers: There's several fps variation. Try 'fast' Tenex vs. 'slow' Tenex: If the vertical size of the group is due to barrel vibration there'll be a significant size difference.

Several other brands were in between. I'll post a complete tabulation at another time.

Reading the reviews on Amazon it appears that the Volquartsen target hammer has an eased ramp for the sear meaning reduced trigger pull. (Pulling the trigger lifts the hammer a bit against the hammer spring -- a safety feature so the hammer can't 'walk' off the sear with handling of the rifle.) Mine's still stiffer than I like so I have ordered that hammer.

I've gotten another plastic stock and whacked 1" off the butt end. The pull is a little long for me anyway and since the stock is longer than the barrel, that'll take 1" off the storage length of the rifle.

These stocks are hollow with a wall about 3/16" thick. I think I can figure out how to screw the rear end of the receiver to the stock without having to install a tang. Probably I should try that before fooling with tuning the forearm since firming the tang will change the barrel vibration.
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  #39  
Old 01-24-2016, 09:16 PM
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Just to add a little to the research by Walt464, I measured a couple barrels I am interested in at some gun shops with these observations:
I measured each one multiple times with calipers at a couple different points along the barrel at the takedown joint.

The new Ruger fluted takedown bull barrel measured 0.494"
A Gemtech Mist barrel measured 0.494"
A Mcgowen bull barrel measured 0.498"
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  #40  
Old 01-29-2016, 10:18 PM
walt464

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Progress or something

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Originally Posted by SierraScout View Post
The new Ruger fluted takedown bull barrel measured 0.494"
A Gemtech Mist barrel measured 0.494"
A Mcgowen bull barrel measured 0.498"
Fascinating; THANKS! My 'new' makeover (regular 10/22 cut down for TD use) is 0.499 at one end and 0.4992 at the other and you don't just slap it together. The use of anti-seize grease is critical and it must be felt into place.

I think all TDs now are SS barrels; I would not try to tighten the joint on a blued barrel because they may be soft enough that the bolt will peen the breech face slightly and a big day at the range might make it a Formerly TD rifle. There has to be a reason that the breech face is heat treated on the SS barrels.

Since last report I have tightened things up in the action-to-stock bedding. I had formerly taped the place at the rear of the stock where the receiver and trigger group hook in; I redid that with J-B Weld.

Overall result: Groups doubled in size. This is not really surprising because the harder material and tighter mounting means vibration transfers better to a stock that doesn't absorb it very well but just becomes part of the vibrating system. Mine is synthetic: The moisture resistance is great but the springiness (instead of the squish of wood) means that damping (=swallowing the energy of vibration) must be provided elsewhere. Where? Well ... I don't know yet! I should look at people's suggestions for bedding a TD -- it is, of course, entirely different than the standard 10/22.

Ruger's factory bed is a bit of clearance at the rear of the receiver and friction from a pair of vertical ribs inside the area where the receiver lands in the stock. On some stocks these bind a bit on the receiver; on others there's a bit of clearance. For a simple tuning job I'd try tape at these points and perhaps enough at other places to give friction elsewhere. Also tape back where the action hooks into the stock. And various combinations of these.

The problem with tape is that it is likely to change over time -- wear, moisture, etc. But it'll certainly help figure things out.

Nothing I've done by way of bedding is irreversible. Worst case I can buy or make a wood stock. Bedding work is slow because even in good weather I can only get to the range once or twice a week and I haven't yet seen specific directions for this rifle.

Ideally a rifle of this type is a series of masses connected by not-quite-rigid joints that dissipate energy -- fiber, cork, oiled felt, tape, wood, are commonly used. But some joints must be metal-metal rigid: The barrel-to-action is one of those, ditto the joints between the receiver and the scope.

A scoped rifle will be different than one without. Since your most accurate shooting will likely be with the scope, do the bedding with it in place.

Target rifles are less critical because a bull barrel is much stiffer, hence vibration is a smaller issue. It's the tuning of a carbine to target standards that's the big challenge. But the barrels seem able to do it: It's just a matter of controlling vibration.

In the really good luck department I ordered a stripped bolt, thinking I'd send it out for firing pin pinning and headspace adjustment. It came today and the headspace measures 0.0425": There's nothing to be done to that! I'll let pinning go for now and set this aside until I have the groups back where they were or better.

The bolt I'm using is 0.046" or 0.047" so the changeover should be a good test of headspace reduction.

Though most people do it as part of any bolt job I don't think 'radiusing' is a good idea. Ruger has been 50-some years with that curve of bolt closing force vs. distance: I need a much stronger reason than the bolt is a little hard to retract to change that. Yes most people do it and they all think it's fine.

A VQ 'target' hammer is supposed to come tomorrow. That should be the last step in my trigger job -- the hammer, polished sear, shims each side of disconnector, larger pin for trigger, and two coils cut off trigger plunger spring. It's crisp now and around 4#; the new hammer ($35, the only cost) should cut that substantially Other than the plunger spring I'm leaving all the springs stock.
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  #41  
Old 02-07-2016, 09:58 PM
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Looks like it's getting there.

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Originally Posted by walt464 View Post
Since last report I have tightened things up in the action-to-stock bedding. I had formerly taped the place at the rear of the stock where the receiver and trigger group hook in; I redid that with J-B Weld.

Overall result: Groups doubled in size.
Doubled was most 50Y groups 1" to 1-1/2". Not Good!

This time I guessed right and kept the J-B Weld at the butt end of the receiver. After some further work (below) I shot a 25Y group with three in one hole, one 1/8" off, and the 5th shot badly pulled -- 1/2" off. I had NO sight picture on that last shot. You've heard my excuses before so I'll skip them. This was 'S*K' match ammo. Good stuff, with a MV of 1007 f/s in this rifle -- rated is 1050 f/s.

The first four in 1/8" is good enough. The work on this rifle is:

Bipod on fore end; there's a piece of cork (see below) between the bipod mount and the fore end.

UTG 'Bugbuster' 3-9x32 scope: Advantages cheap, AO, variable power, compact. Disadvantages crosshairs sometimes get a bit loose (up to 1/2" at 50Y) tho not yet on this one and field not perfectly flat.

Original trigger with polishing and reduction of angle on sear. Shimmed, oversize trigger pin, reduced plunger spring length by 2 coils. The VQ 'target' hammer had a longer pull; I decided not to use it.

Stock shortened 1" and plugged with J-B Weld-ed wood. Length of pull was 13-1/2, a bit long for me, and shortening the stock (it's longer than the barrel) will allow a shorter carrying case -- a future project.

Barrel fit: Some are better than others. I cannot really recommend doing as I did -- cutting down a 'standard' SS 10/22 barrel to a very snug fit. It works but it's fussy work and you wind up with a rifle that's suited only for a fanatic. One easy step is putting a 7/16" by 1/16" thick O ring on the barrel shank up at the shoulder. I didn't try this alone but it seemed to make some difference. Another harmless and possibly helpful step -- apply moly anti-seize grease to the shank. I MUST use it but it takes up some space (increased stiffness for vibration) and helps assure you'll always be able to take down your rifle so why not?

Headspace: I replaced the original bolt with a take-out that measured 0.0425 as I received it. I think this reduced group sizes somewhat; I expect to have a better idea after more testing. Certainly 1/8" (three were ~same hole) is hard to beat.

If you want these things or others like them, do them before starting to tune for accuracy as you may have to retune after they're done. Even a change of scope or a higher or lower mount may cause tuning changes.

Now for tuning, that is, bedding:

Scrubbed inside rear of (plastic) stock with coarse sandpaper and put in J-B Weld. The whole area should be coated, using enough to assure complete fill of the gap at the rear of the receiver without too much running out. Go about 1/8" around the side corners. I use plumber's silicone grease as a 'release' agent on the rear of the receiver and trigger group. Cover more area than you think is necessary -- some J-B always goes where you don't want it.

You DON'T want to completely fill the notch between the trigger group and the lower surface of the receiver with J-B as you won't be able to assemble/disassemble if you do. Just a little higher than the current ridge in the plastic is ideal.

Cure at 100-120 degrees -- warm but not too hot to hold your finger on -- for about two hours. Rotate the stock for uniform heating. It's ready to come apart when the end of a pin just dents the surface.

Taking it apart at this time (rather than when fully cured) means you can use an X-Acto knife to do any necessary trimming.

The goal of this is NO relative movement between the rear of the receiver and the mating surface of the stock.

Cut a piece of 1/16" cork sheet to fully cover the surface where the stock mounting screw comes through. This sheet is sold for making automotive (etc.) gaskets at automotive stores, Amazon, etc. It's actually a composite of ground cork and ground rubber.

Cut a piece of the same material to cover the surface where the handguard screw comes through. This should extend over the full length of the plastic (lower side of the block); cut a slot for the barrel release.

Check that the vertical ridges inside the stock about midway on the receiver actually touch the receiver: There should be a bit of friction there when assembling the receiver to the stock.

That's it. The large irregular groups became the small one I shot today with those steps. The theory is that the barreled action is tightly pivoted at the rear, supported by a material that absorbs vibration at the stock mounting screw. Any vibration squashes the cork which dampens it.

I did both parts of this -- the J-B bedding at the rear and the cork at the front -- twice. (Original stock and cut down one.) Same result for both: The J-B alone made the groups worse: Sometimes big and sometimes just tall. Adding the cork cut it down to a single hole.

I guarantee that slight additional changes will be needed -- tightness of screws? -- but that basic setup should be a good starting point for any rifle configured like mine.

I did some ammo measurements with a chronograph; I'll post them soon. In general match ammo comes out of the 18-1/2" TD barrel at somewhat less than the rated MV.

Not much shooting for the next week or two. I quit when it gets below about 40!
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  #42  
Old 02-09-2016, 12:46 AM
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Awesome research Walt! I have been following your posts carefully and am interested in what you think you would machine the barrel shank to knowing what you know now? 0.497? .498? Or go just a tad over stock and go for .496?
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  #43  
Old 02-14-2016, 09:26 PM
walt464

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TD shank recommendation

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Awesome research Walt! I have been following your posts carefully and am interested in what you think you would machine the barrel shank to knowing what you know now? 0.497? .498? Or go just a tad over stock and go for .496?
Thanks; I'm never sure how interesting these novel-length stories are but if they're useful to anyone then they're worth the few minutes.

Sierra, when I do it again I'll probably shoot for exactly 0.499 as I did this time but NOT allowing the 0.0002 over that I did this time. However use of the anti-galling grease is mandatory at that size and I'm not sure how much additional accuracy results.

The grease I use is Moly-Lit lubricant and anti-seize grease. Amazon has it in several sizes, 2oz is a lifetime supply though their default order is 8oz I believe. It would probably be good practice on any TD that isn't taken down as a matter of routine but it's messy -- contains graphite and leaves black smudges everywhere.

I think I'd recommend 0.498 to 0.4985 in general. That should be trouble free while giving most or all of the accuracy improvement.

It seems to me that it has gotten a bit harder to take mine apart so my concern about peening by the bolt may be proving realistic. The maximum diameter I've been able to measure is 0.4993, though, so if there is an effect it is slight.

Modifying a standard barrel to TD service should be straightforward for any gunsmith with the necessary tooling: A good lathe and a mill. I did mine with rather less than that -- a 7x14 mini-lathe and a file -- and it has turned out okay.

The problem with the mini-lathe on a job like this is it's not really stiff enough to cut to tolerances under 0.001 when the work varies in hardness along the cut and it's an interrupted cut -- the extractor notch. I've done quite a bit of work to stiffen my mini but the cross section of the headstock is too small, the quill is small, etc.

The result is okay but a larger sturdier lathe in good condition -- any gunsmith will have one -- would make it much easier.

There are a few tricks to the machine work: The shank must be concentric and aligned with the bore unless you're going to change scopes with the barrel. The outside of the barrel is neither at the chamber end: Perhaps they hand buff the milled cuts on that end? I made a 6" rod to snugly fit the bore at one end and the chamber on the other, ending in a 3/8" button with a centerdrill at the chamber end. At the muzzle end I gripped in a 4-jaw chuck using aluminum stock to prevent marring, dialed that to center. It turned out to shoot within a few clicks each way of the original barrel so that's good enough.

Interestingly the (larger) factory shank on the 'new' barrel was about 0.008 off center; I don't know about parallelism of the axies.

There's another thread on RFC from a guy who cut down a bull barrel for his. I'll probably get around to that, one day.

More data to come, but there won't be much until the weather warms up. Maybe Thursday, less likely on Tuesday. 4" of show predicted tonight.

Last edited by walt464; 02-14-2016 at 09:29 PM.
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Old 03-02-2016, 03:11 PM
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Another step sideways

After further tests with various ammo gave strange and variable groups -- five shots divided between two one-hole groups 5/8" apart at 12 and 6 o'clock, then repeating with the groups at 9 and 3 o'clock after going down 16 clicks???? -- I dry fired a few. Sure enough, the dreaded 2 MOA twitch of the crosshairs is already there on a scope that is less than three months old and has always lived on my TD.

This isn't a problem on a particular shot: The barrel's already where it's going to be when the bullet leaves. But if the reticule can jump around when the scope (rifle) isn't moving who knows if it always stops in the same place for the NEXT shot? Probably not, I'd say. In fact, I've seen this circus act before and the groups always improve markedly when I get a better (or new) scope.

I love the features of the little UTG 'Bugbuster' 3-9 scopes but they seem to be only for beer can and non-precision hunting shooting -- not for any sort of precision. I have written to UTG to see what they have to say: If the answer is interesting I'll report it here.

I have now ordered this:

http://swfa.com/SWFA-SS-12x42-Tactic...pe-P53714.aspx

That's a big scope -- 30 mm tube and 14" long -- for a 10/22 but there's not going to be an accuracy problem and the price of $300 is entirely reasonable for the quality. (Read the reviews there and the ones on Amazon for another version of this scope.)

In my opinion the whole variable power thing is foolishness for most shooting. Yes there are a few situations when quick target acquisition -- i.e. low power -- is critical and an uncommon long shot demands high power but 'few' is the operative word. For target and poor man's precision work the right power for the range and your eyes might as well be there all the time.

In fact, a variable power scope is a fixed power scope with a variable power magnifier behind it: A bunch more optics and mechanics has to be added. Only if you need the results does that make sense.

Only a few companies supply fixed power scopes in the moderate price/moderate power range and fewer still do it in AO. SWFA has this scope in 6, 10, and 12x that I know of. Note also that it's available 'mil-mil,' that is, a mil dot reticule with 0.1 mil clicks.
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Old 03-04-2016, 05:52 PM
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More small steps

I checked the SWFA website: The scope I have on order (it's in my state now per UPS, delivery Tues.) is made in 6, 10, 12, 16, 20 power in the same 14" (plus a bit) package, also 3-15x for those who want variable power. 30 mm tube so it's a lot to bolt on a 10/22 but this is basically a military scope; optical and mechanism quality isn't going to be an issue. $300 for the fixed power ones.

I had written Leapers about my 2MOA crosshair twitch which causes groups to be maybe 1MOA larger than I expect. Today I had a long cordial call from their customer service. I think it would be fair to say that they consider that within design tolerance for this optic.

I cannot really disapprove: I'll bet 90% of those scopes are used for beer cans or squirrels at 25 yards and on larger rifles for deer out to 100Y or so and it would be absolutely fine in such jobs. The features are great, the one on my moderately high recoil centerfire rifle is as accurate as ever after a few hundred rounds.

It's a hunting/plinking scope, not a precision or benchrest shooter's scope.

The C.S. person said Leapers is planning additional products and I urged him to consider this (3-9x32 'Bugbuster') in a Pro or Precision version with the same size and features plus:

1. Will hold zero to 1/4 MOA rather than 2 MOA.

2. Threaded front/rear bells to allow screw in accessories.

3. 0.1 Mil clicks instead of 1/4 MOA, at least as an option. Once you use a rifle that's 'mil-mil' (mil dot reticule and 0.1 mill clicks) you're not going to go back -- it just makes everything a whole lot easier for field shooting.

(The mil dots give you an effective rangefinder and you can confirm with the adjustable objective. You can build a ballistic table with mils of elevation for various ranges and correction for various wind or target movement speeds. You can then either crank those into the dials or hold accordingly. If the shot is off by x mils per the reticule you can multiply x by 10 and crank the knob(s).

The thing is, there's NO scope in this power range that's this size except this one -- and the size and power is exactly right for a 10/22 -- the world's most heavily produced .22LR semiauto rifle. You can get this scope with minor variation in the features under a dozen or more labels but they're all made in the Leapers factory in China: Nobody else does 'compact variable power scope' or even 'compact fixed 10x scope' in this ballpark.

If I'm wrong please tell me, but I've spent hours looking and I haven't found anything like it. That's how I got to the SWFA scope.

Finally, I took my rifle apart and cleaned and very carefully measured the barrel shank. Sure enough, it had peened just a little bit. As originally machined the breech end was 0.4992 at the largest dimension. (Yes ... maybe 0.0002 out of round -- my lathe's not stiff enough to cut hardened SS perfectly round on an interrupted cut). After maybe 400 rounds it was 0.4994 at the largest dimension and sure enough, pretty hard to pull apart.

When you look at the breech face you can see two clean areas left where the bolt smacks it. The spreading occurs in those areas. Half an hour with a strip of 400-grit wetordry paper pulled back and forth brought it back down to 0.4992 and it went back together easily.

The original barrel is very slightly chamfered at the breech end; I will do that before shooting again. I'd say for practical use the tightest I'd go would be NOT OVER 0.499. Use of anti-galling grease is essential with this close fit: You can't even try the fit once without it without risking it galling and being scarred or maybe even impossible to get apart.
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