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  #16  
Old 02-03-2011, 09:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmccorki View Post
This Browning 52 on GB

http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/Vie...Item=211021235

appears to be a satin finish, at least compared to the gloss finish on the Browing 1885s produced around the same time

http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/Vie...Item=211140565

All of the Browning 52s I have seen have the satin finish, so maybe the high gloss is more rare.
I purchased the 211021235 rifle, and can confirm it does have the satin finish.
I can also confirm it is a very sweet shooter !!!
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  #17  
Old 02-05-2011, 12:38 PM
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R F C links to Winchester Info

Hello All,

There seems to still be a lot of confusion among some folks regarding the proper method for inserting and removing the bolt from a Model 52 rifle. The instructions in the manual that came with my 52 re-issue are quite easy to follow. Refer to pages 13, 14, 15 and 16 for the correct method. The only thing that I would add is that I don't use a screwdriver to depress the sear, I use a disposable bamboo chopstick available at any local Chinese restaurant. They are plenty strong enough to do the job and they won't mar the surface of the sear or action.

http://media.winchesterguns.com/pdf/...anual_om_s.pdf


Kix

STICKY???
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  #18  
Old 02-07-2011, 08:17 PM
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R F C links to Winchester Info

I was able to get pictures of the Sam Moore sight that I had mentioned some time ago. I don't know of their vintage or how many were produced but according to my sources they were the sight to have prior to Sam Gates producing his wonderful sight. The rear knob is for windage and the knob in the front of the sight body is for elevation. The 52 receiver needed to be D/T on the rear bridge for 8/40 screws which allowed the base to be attached to the action. The 52B that I had restocked was originally owned by Frank Boyd and my rifle is D/T for this sight. My buddy has two but only one base. I thought those who like the model 52 would enjoy seeing this unique sight







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  #19  
Old 02-27-2011, 12:56 PM
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R F C links to Winchester Info

Good article, probably posted here before, but here goes: http://jmtpublishing.com/articles/20...l__52_Bolt.asp
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  #20  
Old 03-13-2011, 10:29 PM
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Here is a scan from a 52B brochure. The top rifle has a Marksman stock, while the lower has the standard stock. Hope this helps.
Steve
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  #21  
Old 03-18-2011, 05:45 AM
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R F C links to Winchester Info

A link to the best image and instructions I have found for the C trigger...even I can follow it! Particularly the bolt removal sequence.

http://www.milsurps.com/showthread.php?t=9436

Mike95

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  #22  
Old 04-15-2011, 10:47 PM
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R F C links to Winchester Info

Get the best deal on a Model 52

Drooling over the 52’s I see selling on the various e-auction:com sites, it is so easy to get discoraged. I have spent a lot of time on this Forum obtaining as much information as possible so I could make a good informed decision. In my case, and I’m sure others are in a similar situation, there won’t be multiple purchases. Due to limited funding, the next 52 will be the rifle I keep for quite some time. In addition, I knew I would need to be knowledgeable enough to be able to properly evaluate and eventually negotiate the best monetary value possible.

Here are some hints and tips on just exactly how to do this: I don’t see how you could go too far wrong by following this plan, it worked for me, twice.

1 – Live on this Forum. In my case, I kept up with this Excellent Forum for over a year before I formerly joined and asked my own questions. I just didn’t feel I could contribute until I did my homework. The guy’s here are great.

2 – Unless you absolutely are looking for one specific model, learn about them all. You never know what you will bump into out there and you’ll want to be able to evaluate your find on-the-spot. You might not be able to go home and research it prior to a buy. I guarantee it will be gone when you get back. There’s the Pre-A’s thru to the E’s. Then there are all the sub-groups and offshoot models. You will need to be able to look at a potential purchase and figure out what it is. A few important points will be barrel length, length of pull, what Winchester drilled and tapped and what they didn’t. You will need to be able to recognize a re-blue and special considerations such as the Pre-A tendency to crack. You will need to bring a bore light and possibly a q-tip to examine the barrel (A tip learned from my reading, is to stick a white q-tip into the end of the barrel to have the reflected light show up the grooves and lands better).

3 – Evaluate your personal skills. There are problems and issues with almost every 52 out there unless you buy new in-the-box. Determine what you can do without relying on a gunsmith. Are you good at stock repair and refinishing? If not, are you willing to learn? Do you feel comfortable and have the tools to dismantle the entire gun, if for no other reason than to give it a good cleaning? Are you willing to replace non-standard or broken parts? Will you need to re-blue? Can you properly evaluate a loose bolt or even take one out of a 52? You will also need to put it back for the dealer. If he doesn’t know how, that’s a good sign for you.

4 – Compile a list of everyone and every business in your area that can deal with firearms. Be sure you can visit them in person. Disregard all of the mail order houses, even CMP in my opinion unless they are new. You really need to see the item in person, properly evaluate it and be able to make an offer after you have learned the asking price. My list contains about 80 potential dealers and gunsmiths. You can’t deal well on-line or at all with the CMP.

Compile your list by distance or some other method that works for you. I did the North, South, East West route twice. Once for within 25 miles and a second time for those greater than 25 miles. I traveled nearly 160 miles before I found my 52C. I did luck out and found my Pre-A, 6 miles from home.

5 – Pick a day and select a group of your contacts and head-out. It will help if you make a phone call 1st so the dealer or private party knows you are coming. If you bring a friend, that can help with the enjoyment. If your friend has a 52, that certainly can help you with your evaluation. If the friend has a habit of helping you with your negotiating, leave him in the car. A good friend will give you your personal space when it comes to what you are willing to pay, or not. You don’t need someone egging you on to spend the additional $175 because it is a good deal. This is your decision and no-one else’s.

6 – Leave your name and address with each contact. It might help to have a business card or a 3X5 card with your name, phone number and your wants listed. I went as far as putting my price range for a rifle in good condition. Not all of your contacts will be there when you show up. Be sure to follow up later or at least, phone them with your name and your wants for their records. My 52C was found by a dealer who never met me. I had called him and left my information. I also gave him my price range of $700-$1400. My wife said, “No Way”. I bought the 52C for $575. And… The wife wasn’t with me.

7 – Do not get discouraged. Never give up. Stay true to your values and keep on plugging away. For every contact you leave, only 2% will get back to you. Those who do get back to you are serious, so you will immediately have a shoe in the door. One shop I visited had a client who was buying 52’s and they were his FFL. They said he must have over 80 Model 52’s and they were receiving 2 more that same week. I asked if he ever sold, but he was only buying high-end. I wrote that one off. 80 Model 52’s, how discouraging is that to one with none?

8 – Build your contacts. Maybe you attend gun shows? Maybe you have a friend who is a dealer or attends gun shows? Maybe you know someone who spends a lot of time at a certain dealer? Post a wanted poster at your local gunclub, hunting camp or grocery store. Don’t forget to leave your name and number. Don’t forget the local gun auction houses and the sleeper of sleepers, the Pawn Shop. Find one that doesn’t just deal in gold and silver.

9 – Test out your skills. Go to the auction sites and look at the pictures. Read the descriptions. Chances are they are all at least 25% overpriced. See if you can find the flaws, or what is not shown. You will soon learn that there are problems with them that may not be real obvious. If someone is selling a Pre-A with only 60% blue left and the stock has been abused, cut or shortened and they want $995 for it, you will tune your skills. You will also find some that are in fairly good condition but the price is $1200 without any sights. Overpriced!

10 – Find the bad. Every gun will have problems of one sort or another. Unless you are buying a safe queen, you will need to quickly identify all the problems. You will use these in your negotiations. Maybe there is a recoil pad installed. If the stock has been cut or has a bad crack, that’s good for -$300. You did evaluate you skills, didn’t you? If there is US Property stenciled on the side, that’s a big deduction with 50% of those who love 52’s. It is 100% when you are doing the buying, even if you prefer the military stock. Maybe it has pits or rust. Most guns have some. It’s your job to point them out.

11 - Be prepared to walk. If it’s not everything you want or expected and something just doesn’t feel right, walk. Especially if you start negotiations and things appear to be going to tough. Maybe the dealer only took off 25 – 50 dollars? Never offer a price until you hear the asking price. If the asking price is high, offer an equally ridiculous low price. What have you got to lose? If the deal looks right, don’t be afraid to say you can only go so high and respectfully ask for some better middle ground.

12 – Cash is King, especially in today’s environment. Lots of times, a dealer has already made his money when he took your gun in as a trade-in for a new purchase. That may mean that you could be in a position where you have more room than you think, to negotiate in. Don’t be afraid to think about it. Don’t be afraid to pull out $550 dollars on a gun with a $700 price tag. You did bring cash, didn’t you? There are about 100 reasons why cash is better than a check or credit card that we need not go into here.

13 – You haven’t saved enough money. This is a tough one, but after a while you will know if you haven’t enough to buy what you want. Put the project on-hold until you feel comfortable. Never settle for a beater for $275 when you could have the rifle of your dreams for $575.

14 – Are you into bundling? If you can save $125e off two guns if you buy both, that’s a savings of $250. Not bad. Remember the friend? You did bring your friend looking for a Model 94, didn’t you?

15– Know a gift horse when you see it. There comes a time when you know its right. If you get a chance to buy a 52 for $300, and it’s in good condition, don’t offer $150. That is, unless the seller is an older widow wanting $25 for something you know is worth $500. Do the right thing and offer a fair value. My Pre-A was $300 and there was no bartering. It was just a plain good deal.

16 – Don’t sink your own ship. You won’t get any deals if you say “wow, there has to be $350 worth of sights on that gun”.


In conclusion: Just be prepared for the unexpected. Keep your wits about you and remember to be personable with the seller. There is a difference in calling out blemishes on something you are about to purchase and an actual insult. You do get more with pleasantness. Last of all, make this an enjoyable adventure and have some fun with it.

May you also have the best of luck….

Anyone else with some good tips?

Thanks for reading….
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  #23  
Old 06-17-2011, 10:13 PM
Seewin
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You are correct, the hollow bolt handle change started with the Featherweights in 1952. Just as a matter of point, the very first Featerweights manufactured, which were 308's, did not have the hole, they were solid like the othere 70's. These early versions are very desirable collector's items today. Very shortly after the Featherweight introduction in 1952, all Featherweights received this change. The other 70 models received this change as well througout the next couple of years to where all Model 70's had hollow bolt handles. The reason given for the change was to save weight.
The 52's had the hole in the handle from day 1. As to why, I do not think it was for weight saving. I believe it was done to posssibly provide a means of support in the turning operation of the knob by means of a tailstock/center arrangement on the turning lathe. Quite possibly it was also used to provide a way to grasp the knob when it was bent into shape. I would imagine the shank of the handle was heated by some means, then an appropriately sized rod was placed in the hole to act as a handle and then used to bend the shank to the proper angle. This is all speculation on my part.
I have attached a couple of photos of a "52 bolt handle paperweight" given to me by former Winchester executive and later author, Tom Henshaw. It was given to him to use as a paperweight on his desk in the New Haven plant, by one of the plant employees. This is the handle just as it came off the turning lathe, and prior to the subsequent milling/drilling/forming operations. You can see the hole is in the knob at this point in production. Kind of a unique piece of Winchester memorabilia.
Steve

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  #24  
Old 07-20-2011, 03:33 PM
Seewin
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Kenny,
Here are some pics to illustrate the pads. The round pads were used early on the "B" models, while the strips were used on later "B's, and all the "C" targets.
Pads were used on Marksman stocked guns only.
Steve




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  #25  
Old 08-16-2011, 12:55 PM
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M-52 Information

Have not seen this site referenced here. I found it very helpful. Further exploration of the site offers a lot of useful information to the small bore enthusiast.

http://www.rifleman.org.uk/Wincheste..._52_rifles.htm

Happy Shooting

Brer Rabbit
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  #26  
Old 01-10-2012, 11:58 AM
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Thought this 52C Diagram might be useful.

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  #27  
Old 04-18-2012, 05:09 PM
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That is my pic of my collecsion of Redfield sights. I don't have one for Lyman..
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  #28  
Old 05-27-2012, 08:43 PM
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R F C links to Winchester Info

Does anybody have any information about the Kenyon action! I personally have never seen one! Did he just make a few of them or did he produce several like the triggers!
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  #29  
Old 05-27-2012, 09:29 PM
Seewin
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John, I have never personally seen one. I think he must have just made a handfull...that's just a guess though. I would be surprised if he made over 5 or 6. I guarantee he did not make as many as he did triggers.
Steve
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  #30  
Old 05-27-2012, 10:00 PM
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Thanks for the information! I figured that he didn't make many! I just wonder if he had problems with the action or some other reason that so few were made!
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