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Old 12-19-2015, 11:04 AM
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School me on suppressors, please.



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A year or two ago our governor signed into law a bill making it legal to hunt with suppressors. Until then I never saw much utility in having one. Giving it some consideration now but know next to nothing about them or ownership of one.

Is a suppressor slaved to a particular firearm? Or can it legally be moved from one firearm to another?

If they can be rotated between firearms, is there utility in getting one for, say, a 30 caliber rifle with the intention of using it on everything from a 300 H&H to a 223 carbine? Or is the best answer to such up the $$$ cost and get one for each firearm?

Would a suppressor designed for a 9mm carbine be effective on a 223 carbine?
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Old 12-19-2015, 12:03 PM
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Generally speaking, there are three classes; rimfire, pistol and rifle.

Yes, you can use a bigger size on a smaller caliber but generally its not advised to shoot rimfire through pistol or rifle cans because they're not designed to be taken apart and cleaned and as you know, rimfire powder is pretty dirty stuff not to mention potential lead buildup. Most rimfire cans can be disassembled for cleaning.

The thread patterns vary by caliber so keep in mind swapping a 45 can to a 9mm requires a new piston to match the threads on your barrel. Not all threads are standard, either.....Sig uses a lefthand thread on 9mm whereas 1/2-28RH is normal on 9mm cans.

The suppressors themselves are considered firearms by BATFE so they're not linked to any particular gun.

Lastly....rifle cans are designed for much higher pressures than pistol cans. While you could set up a 9mm can to mount on a 223 host, its not a good idea. Shooting a 9mm through a .338 can is theoretically possible, its not recommended.

I bought an AAC TiRant-45 and shoot 45 and 9mm through it. You can also shoot 300BLK subsonic only through it or the 9mm version of the AAC can. Shooting regular 300BLK hypersonic rounds would be too much pressure for it to last very long.

Hope this helps....
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Old 12-19-2015, 01:36 PM
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Thanks for that.

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Originally Posted by PGT View Post
The thread patterns vary by caliber ...
Bummerdesu. That's rather inconvenient.
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Old 12-19-2015, 02:51 PM
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Have been getting into the NFA stuff for the last few years. Wish I'd have done it a long time ago.

I think ultimately having a can for each gun would be great. Not sure that is doable for me. A good rimfire can is a great way to start. Shooting subsonic or standard velocity ammo through a bolt action with a can is silly fun. Pretty much you hear the click of the firing pin hitting, then the thud of the bullet hitting the target. Great for pistols also.

My current favorite centerfire rifle can is Silencerco's Omega. It would be a good first can as it is configurable for different guns. It is a 30 cal. can, but with a 5.56 end cap on, it sounds really good on .223 AR15s, and it relatively light weight .

You have to look at the specs on each can to see if it will work with the caliber vs barrel length you are using. Also some lighter Titanium cans are intended for bolt actions, with limited semi auto use. It was a little overwhelming to me at first. There seems to be a lot of good cans out there now.

Have not gotten into pistol cans yet.
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Old 12-20-2015, 07:42 AM
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.

It is perfectly legal to build your own suppressor, with an approved Form 1 in-hand.
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Old 12-20-2015, 07:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sophia View Post

..., is there utility in getting one for, say, a 30 caliber rifle with the intention of using it on everything from a 300 H&H to a 223 carbine? Or is the best answer to such up the $$$ cost and get one for each firearm?
Yes, it is more versatile to have a .30 suppressor that can be used on several different guns than to have a .223 that is limited to that one caliber.

Adapters are readily available for different thread patterns.
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Old 12-20-2015, 08:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hilljack View Post
... A good rimfire can is a great way to start. Shooting subsonic or standard velocity ammo through a bolt action with a can is silly fun. Pretty much you hear the click of the firing pin hitting, then the thud of the bullet hitting the target. Great for pistols also.
.
Absolutely agree with this. It's like the infamous 10/22, everybody should own at least one.

A rimfire suppressor typically provides the best "bang for your buck" and the effect is most dramatic (you will still have the sound of a supersonic crack with most centerfire calibers).

It's nice to be able to talk while shooting and the noise be no more than the click of the hammer, the whiz of the bullet in flight and the sound of its impact.
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Old 12-20-2015, 09:13 AM
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Sophia , you (imo) will shoot and enjoy a rimfire can more than any centerfire can . With that being said , If you want a centerfire can for hunting game I suggest that you get a .30 cal can that is rated for the largest round you use ( say .300 winmag or .300 rum , or whatever ) . Many of the " better " centerfire direct mount cans now feature replaceable endcaps so that you can have a 5/8x24 for your .30 cal rifle , and a 1/2x28 for your .223 or whatever . If the can you select does not have that feature , then adapters to go from 1/2x28 up to the .30 can are avalable , or you can go with a quick attach method where it mounts to a muzzle device and put a device on each rifle . The one thing you DON"T want to do is shoot rimfire ammo through your centerfire can . Feel free to drop me a pm if you want to dive into the weeds so to speak on common pitfalls ect..
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Old 12-20-2015, 09:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by parshooter View Post
.

It is perfectly legal to build your own suppressor, with an approved Form 1 in-hand.
Legal yes, advisable no. The problem is as a maker (manufacturers paid the tax to be an 07/02) you can make it exactly once. If damaged you cannot repair it; only an 07/02 can. And they often won't work on form 1 cans because they don't know how it was engineered.

The only exception is if you spend days a week working in a machine shop making precision things. Otherwise buy commercial, IMO.


It looks like all questions have been answered, but I'll add there are a few highly versatile cans. The Liberty Mystic X is a 9mm can that can be taken apart (although not always easily), and is rated for 5.56 with a 16" + barrel, 30-30 etc. Griffin Armament has a similar can that has even more options, and I think SilencerCo has a .45acp can rated for everything. I know the .45acp Osprey will take 7.62x39.

Personally I find "pistol" suppressors least pleasing as they make the gun really nose heavy. Rimfire cans are great because they are really quiet, but honestly I mainly enjoy a suppressed AR15 most. They are just so loud, and even suppressed they are loud, but not as brutal.

EDIT: I have the older Liberty Mystic 9mm can. To date it has 6,985 rounds through it. 2,130 of those were .223/5.56 on an AR. It has even had full auto .22lr through it. I no longer even have a pistol host for it other than Ruger .22lr pistols (that I have .22lr cans for).

Last edited by 98_1LE; 12-20-2015 at 09:34 AM.
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Old 12-20-2015, 02:29 PM
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GET ONE!!

I was on the fence for a long time about getting one. My buddy betty me I would enjoy one, so he paid to have my cm-2 threaded. The deal was that if I giggled like a little girl I would pay him back. Figured ok sweet something I don't have to pay for. Well he let me shoot the rifle with his silence co sparrow....needless to say I paid him for the threading.

Once my paperwork was complete I just had to wait for everything to be completed.

One word of advice....Hey your paperwork done, and forget about it. The wait it honestly the hardest part. Now my rimfires are only shot unsuppressed to show people how quiet they really are. Heck I shot a rabbit yesterday, and when I walked over to pick it up another one jumped out 5 feet from the one I just shot. Didn't hear a thing just saw his buddy lay down.

Hey one and don't look back.
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Old 12-20-2015, 03:14 PM
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Agree about the handi rifle in 300 Blackout. However I soon discovered I could get the ruger American ranch in 300 blackout for less than $100 more. Now I have both

The ruger of course allows faster follow up shots and feels more like an adult gun to my 6'2" frame. They are an amazingly good value and the trigger can be easily tuned to perfection. I'll probably get at lease 1-2 more American rifles.

Last edited by GasDoc; 12-20-2015 at 03:21 PM.
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Old 12-20-2015, 03:17 PM
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98_1LE I wouldn't shoot any supersonic center fire rounds like the AKs 7.62x39 through an octane or an osprey. Pretty sure that's a no no. Only subsonic 300blackout is safe
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Old 12-20-2015, 03:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlysAlot View Post
However shoot a 300 blackout (subsonic loads) and you will never go back.
My buddy has a Liberty Leonidas (integral 300blk AR) and had it at the range Friday. A suppressed .22lr at 100 yards is like: click.......click as the bullet hits the backstop

The Leonidas was: click.......thunk
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Old 12-21-2015, 12:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sophia View Post
Is a suppressor slaved to a particular firearm? Or can it legally be moved from one firearm to another?
The tax stamp is for the suppressor, but there are two main varieties of firearm suppressor: the original can-on-the-end-of-the-barrel style [courtesy of Hiram Percy Maxim,] vs. the integral suppressor [ie, it is built around & is part&parcel of the barrel.] They each have their particular merits, but for obvious reasons, aside from something like an integral built on a 10/22 barrel, the integral suppressor is a one-gun kind of beast.

For most people, the muzzle-can suppressor is going to be the clear winner, due to its portability.

Quote:
If they can be rotated between firearms, is there utility in getting one for, say, a 30 caliber rifle with the intention of using it on everything from a 300 H&H to a 223 carbine? Or is the best answer to such up the $$$ cost and get one for each firearm?
While it is possible to use a suppressor for a larger caliber on a smaller caliber firearm, the efficacy is considerably reduced [ie, you will hear noticeably more noise upon firing,] since a significant portion of a can's efficiency is tied up with how closely the bullet fits thru the hole between chambers inside the can.

Something else to bear in mind is ease of cleaning: 22lr is a notoriously filthy round for suppressed usage; a suppressor built for a larger round may not in fact have the construction designed around easily dismantling for cleaning that a purpose-built 22lr can may have.

Quote:
Would a suppressor designed for a 9mm carbine be effective on a 223 carbine?
Effective? To a degree. Something else to bear in mind is that a suppressor only built to an adequate standard to suppress a pistol round like 9mm Parabellum is likely to fail after a short period of having the more energetic gases given off by a hi-intensity rifle round like .223Rem fired through it. There are, of course, exceptions, and one benefit of having the barrier to easy entry to the market here in the U.S. [that a $200 tax stamp de facto represents] is that the market for cheaply built products is quite marginal indeed, vs. the $30 corner drugstore suppressor available in say, NZ [where the barrier is on gun ownership at all; once that obstacle is surmounted, suppressors are considered a diplomatic optional accessory.]

Another point to consider is the matter of final size: a 22lr suppressor can still be quite small & be effective, but the larger the bore and the more powder used to drive the bullet, the larger the can to suppress that caliber will be. It's kind of a geometric progression: an 8"x1" can for 22lr weighing ounces may in fact be more effective at reducing report [as measured in dB of reduction from peak] than a 2ftx6" can weighing several pounds for the 50BMG, even tho' the bore has only roughly doubled in size. [But the real-world benefit of the 50BMG can is measured more in recoil and flash signature reduction than in reducing outright noise. The same concerns just do not apply to 22lr! ]

[NB: sorry if this post has been superseded in content by other responses to this thread! It was composed about 8hrs ago before RFC took a hiatus & I'm just now getting back to trying to post it. Doh!]

Last edited by Surculus; 12-21-2015 at 12:42 AM.
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Old 12-21-2015, 03:18 AM
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98_1LE I wouldn't shoot any supersonic center fire rounds like the AKs 7.62x39 through an octane or an osprey. Pretty sure that's a no no. Only subsonic 300blackout is safe
My bad. You are right. Not sure what I was thinking.
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