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Old 02-11-2010, 12:13 AM
OcelotZ3

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CM2 Stock refinishing recommendations



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Hi All,

I just received my CM2 from CDNN. Pretty nice rifle for the price...

Anyway, the stock needs refinishing of course. Not being a woodworker, but willing to learn, how does one go about refinishing one of these to make it into a more nice-looking shooter?

It would seem that ultra-fine sandpaper to remove the existing finish might not work too well with the checkering. Would #0000 steel wool work, or should I use something like a paint stripper to remove the finish coat?

I've seen some threads elsewhere that mention how to fill the grain and obtain a nice oil finish: http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=240961

Thanks for any assistance!
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  #2  
Old 02-11-2010, 02:06 AM
Jerel
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CM2 Stock refinishing recommendations

OcelotZ3,

Here are two refinish projects that you might want to read before you start with your CM2.

https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums...d.php?t=245294

http://www.g-owner.net/2009/AAFinalFinish/default.asp

Have a good read and enjoy your refinish project.

Jerel
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Old 02-11-2010, 08:06 AM
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Complete Stock ReDo

How about Overhauling your stock.
I'm sure the thought has crossed your mind.

RET did so and documented his ordeal - more like ... labor of love.
New Ural 1 overhaul.
Ural Overhaul II
Ural Overhaul III
Ural Overhaul IV
Ural Overhaul V
Ural Overhaul VI
Ural Overhaul VII Final stages ... RET

Ural Overhaul VIII Final stages
__________________
W. Edwards Deming ... Quality: It is not enough to do-your-best;
you must know what-to-do, and ... then ... do-your-best.
Ever-Onward ... Through the Fog ---- Fort Stockton TX 79735
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  #4  
Old 02-13-2010, 11:59 PM
OcelotZ3

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Thanks for all the pointers.

I have an old stock refinishing article from American Rifleman from 40 years ago, and they mention "whiting", mixed with "chlorothane", to remove the old skin oils from the old stock. They recommended this because it would avoid "whiskering": The chlorothane would soak into the stock & dissolve the oils, and the "whiting" would pull it all out. Any leftover chlorothane would evaporate.

Is "whiting" similar to "wood bleach"? From the CM2 refinish page, it sounds like "wood bleach" is different because its purpose is to lighten the wood, vs. pulling oils out of the stock.

Thanks!
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Old 02-14-2010, 09:33 AM
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I would use a paint remover and a soft brush. This should remove the old finish without harming the checkering. Personally, I use the lemon based ater soluable kind from Wally World.

After the old finish is gone and the stock has dried, you can access where you want to go from there depending on how the stock looks at that time. Then, steam out any dents and a very light sanding to remove the whiskers.

If everything is the same color, you might consider shellac as I believe that was the original finish and it has a slight yellowish tint to it. If there is a slight color variation, you might consider a stain, but personally I do not like the dark stains and would prefer a lighter one - just a personal preference of mine.

George
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Old 02-14-2010, 07:16 PM
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I stripped my vostok stock with alcohol and paper towels and used an old toothbrush dipped in the alcohol on the checkering. Stained it with leather dye and a coat of boiled linseed oil for finish. No sanding. It's the bottom rifle.

[/IMG]
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Old 02-14-2010, 07:46 PM
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Ocelot,
Whiting is powdered calcium carbonate. You can order it HERE.

Another method to strip the oil from the stock is to use Purple Power, a powerful degreaser available at Wally World. Be sure to wear gloves or else all your skin will peel off. It will pull even the most stubborn oiliness out of the stock, as well as removing an oil finish. The drawback is that you should thoroughly rinse the stock in water after using it. This will of course raise the grain, but you are going to sand the stock anyway, right? Depending on how the stock was originally finished, you might have to use a chemical stripper first. This will get all the finish out of the checkering, although you might have to pursuade it with a stiff bristle brush. Be sure to use eye protection--you don't want to get methylene choride in your eyes. Trent has had some luck using Citristrip, a less toxic/carcinogenic type of wood stripper. I believe he coats the stock with the stuff and then seals it in a plastic bag to keep evaporation to a minimum.

Good luck. Let us know how it turns out!

cb
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Old 02-15-2010, 12:51 AM
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Well, so far I've used Citristrip and removed most of the finish. I might need to do another pass, but right now (aside from the bleaching I'm getting) it looks WAY better.

I'll probably avoid using water (to avoid whiskering per an article I read), and hopefully won't need to do much sanding. For now I'm planning on raising some dents w/iron & wet towel, using whiting w/mineral spirits or alcohol to pull the oil out of the stock (black areas similar to maxima2's) , fill some tack holes with epoxy, then re-stain the stock, and go with an oil finish using Minwax antique finish.

I'm trying to get a decent-looking stock without tons of work, because this rifle will be a shooter (as are all of my guns).

Thanks a lot for the recommendations & pictures! There are sure a lot of different ways to approach these things. I like the way maxima2 did his: quick but effective for a shooter.
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Old 02-15-2010, 01:22 AM
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Ocelot,
If you are going to steam out dents, the grain will be raised by the water, so there's no reason not to rinse. Here's what I learned recently:

I recently did a quicky refinish on 2 40XB stocks I ordered from Numrich. Since I had all the stuff out anyway, I thought I'd refresh the finish on my Remington 37. I hit it with the mineral spirits/BLO, but someone in the past had lacquered, varnished or polyurethaned the stock, so a stripping was in order. I used hardware-store-variety methylene chloride stripper, and it took 2 applications to get all the stuff off. I gave it a good scrubbing/rinsing under hot water, let it drip dry for an hour or two, and then hit it with the Purple Power and a scrub brush. I borrowed an ancient iron that my friend uses to wax her skis (it gets rocket hot and the bottom is flat-no holes for steam). I played around with it and ended up setting it hotter than a modern iron, but not at full strength. Somewhere on RFC I read that a 50/50 mixture of water and rubbing alcohol is what to use for steaming out dents. Probably the volatile nature of the alcohol aids in rapid steam generation.

Anyway, I was steaming along, having moderate success, but not really getting the results I was looking for. I tried a little experiment, and it dramatically improved the effectiveness of the steaming process. I used a small square of an old flour-sack dish towel to apply the water and to lay between the iron and the stock. I saturated the rag with the water/alcohol mix, wrung it out just until it wasn't actively dripping, then put if over the dent to be steamed. Then I walked away, surfed the web for a couple-three minutes before giving it a shot with the hot iron.

The few minutes with the wet rag made all the difference. I'm guessing that it allowed the water to penetrate more deeply into the grain of the wood so that when the heat turned it to steam, it did more "work", plumping up the wood fibers to push the dent out. I left the iron on the stock just until there wasn't a ton of steam rising from the rag. When I pulled the rag off, the surface of the stock would quickly dry from the residual heat, but not be terribly hot to the touch.

Anyway, this is only my second attempt at steaming out dents, but I feel I made a real breakthrough in technique. The first stock I tried was for my Mossberg 46B, and I didn't have nearly the success on that one. I used a soldering copper (I work in a sheet metal shop), but I wouldn't recommend it. I slipped off the rag a time or two, and actually burned the stock a bit. The vintage iron is just the trick, and I have started looking for one locally. Surprisingly they are not that easy to find! There are tons of them on eBay, but the shipping is preposterous. I ran an ad on craigslist here in Seattle, will have to wait and see if that yields any results.

Good luck with your stock. Can't wait to see how it turns out.

cb
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Old 02-15-2010, 03:35 PM
OcelotZ3

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Anyone know what the type of wood is in the darker CM2 stocks?
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Old 02-15-2010, 04:26 PM
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Don't fear the wood whisking.
Thats always been part of refinishing a wood stock. When your all done with
sanding your rifle stock or getting close to staining you take a wet rag & wipe
down your hole stock then take the stock over to a hot burner on your stove
for rapid drying. Then lightly sand again to cut all the whiskers then do it again.
Some open pored wood like walnut have more whiskers then others.
Birch, beech & maples don't whisker to much. They are very tight pored wood.
If you don't do the whisker treatment to your gun stocks those whiskers could pop out
when you put the final finish on your stock.

Swiss

Last edited by midwest swiss; 02-15-2010 at 04:32 PM.
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Old 02-16-2010, 09:16 AM
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OcelotZ3, to answer your question, the wood on the darker stocks is the same as the lighter ones, just stained. Personally I think staining a stock dark is just a cop-out for not doing your stockwork to get the wood clean - but that is just me.

FYI, a gunsmith friend of mine showed me a really neat trick when refinishing a stock, wet sand it with the stock finish as the wetting agent. As the sanding progresses, the wood "dust" fills the pours of the wood and the finish bonds it there. This makes a much smoother stock finish and is faster than finish and sand, finish and sand, etc. ad infinitum until the stock finish finally fills the pours by itself. This ONLY works if you are not staining the stock or are using finsihs with a dark additive.

George
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