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  #1  
Old 07-30-2003, 12:56 PM
Jaywalker
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Browning Auto (ATD) Performance?



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I'm considering a new Browning .22 auto takedown, which I have learned to refer to as the Auto Take Down (ATD) model, and would like some input regarding its performance.

1. I've read that it's reliable - is this true in its current production version?

2. Does it have a grooved scope attachment capability, or standard base holes? Either/both?

3. I understand it could change its point of impact with a receiver-mounted scope before and after disassembly/re-assembly. Is this a lot or a little? A couple of inches? A fraction of an inch?

4. Accuracy?

5. Quality of trigger pull?

6. Any other useful info?

Jaywalker
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  #2  
Old 07-31-2003, 09:36 PM
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Jaywalker

I can't be of much help as my ATD was made in 1963. I bought it new and until 2 years ago it was my only .22.
Fairly accurate. But remember it is also fairly light and short, so accuracy isn't the same as my CZ.

It's been a very dependable rifle. I would think this is still true as this rifle is all steel and it is after all a Browning.

My old one has a grooved receiver for scope mounting. The new ones do not. I believe they are drilled and tapped on the barrel for mounts (cantilever type).

Other useful info: Don't be carried away by the takedown feature. It is a nice feature on a semi-auto to aid in proper barrel cleaning. But that is the only time I take mine down. You can create problems if the barrel take-up adjusting ring gets out of whack.
Check
www.browning.com

This little rifle will never be a match rifle, but it will last you a lifetime.
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  #3  
Old 08-01-2003, 08:06 AM
Jaywalker
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fullchoke,

Can you tell me how accurate? One inch at 50 yards? Two? Three?

Interesting comment on limiting takedown, as I'd never considered it.

Jaywalker
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Old 08-01-2003, 08:53 PM
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Jaywalker, How about giving me til say Monday or Tuesday on this? I haven't shot the ATD much in two years and wasn't paying that much attention to real accuracy then. It has taken a lot of squirrels and rabbits.

I'll get to a measured range over the week-end and be able to give you a better answer.

I'll also take my new Lyman digital trigger scale and pay attention to these things that I never used to worry about.

Thanks for giving me a good excuse to have some fun,aah I mean do some scientific research.
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Old 08-01-2003, 09:59 PM
Jaywalker
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Thanks, I appreciate it. I'll wait.

Jaywalker
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Old 08-01-2003, 11:00 PM
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I've got the Japan model of this fine little 22 auto. I've never put it on the 50 yd range, but at 25 it does real nice with the ammo it likes. Some of the three shot groups touched to make cloverleafs, but definately not with all ammo. Stingers were the worst and I finally settled on CCI Velocitors with half to quarter inch groups at 25. This was when I had a Redfield 3-12x44 on it. Now it wears another scope that only has a 32mm bell on it and fits the lines of the gun well. It shoots very nice without a scope also and is my favorite when I want to go scopeless.

Great little gun for the field though. Nice and light.

Joe
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Old 08-02-2003, 12:09 AM
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Joe, You mentioned having the Japan model of the Browning ATD. Did you mean the Chinese, Norinco model that used to be imported by Interarms? I have the Norinco and love shooting it.

Jaywalker, regarding the scope mount, it does not mount on the receiver for the reasons you expressed concern about (according to Browning). Two screw holes are drilled and tapped into the barrel to receive a proprietary, grooved scope mount that then extends back over the receiver. Browning says that design is so a scope will not lose any orientation to the barrel while going through takedown and reassembly.

Regarding reliability, every 100 rounds or so, the ejector may get "sticky." I just keep a spray can of solvent and a rag handy and hit the ejector area of the breechblock with a quick burst of solvent and a wipe.

It is a fun-gun and arguably the most inherently beautiful .22 rifle ever made -- the lines on this gun are like sculpture to me.

When you break it down, follow Browning's advice and grip the back portion of the rifle by the receiver, not by the stock, or you may end up with a stock that looks like mine -- broken where it joins the receiver (I am currently seeking a replacement stiock on this forum). Regarding the barrel adjustment ring, as long as you make "single-click" adjustments, you should be OK. Be very careful if you ever remove the adjustment mechanism from the barrel -- in fact, don't do it.

Get the rifle and have fun with it -- and wear long sleeves or get used to shooting with your support elbow pointing away from and to the side of the rifle. You'll figure out why during your first outing!
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  #8  
Old 08-02-2003, 11:11 AM
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Nope, not Norinco. Browning moved manufacture of these from Belgium to Japan. I have the Grade I Browning. And btw, the Browning model is a hoot to shoot as well. If shot off a bench, put down a piece of carpet to lessen the bouncing around of the empties.

Joe
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  #9  
Old 08-02-2003, 07:46 PM
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looks like a woman

jcampbell got it right. The Browning Auto 22 has one of the prettiest shapes of any gun of any type ever designed in my opinion.

The lines of the little gun are artwork. Its shape reminds me of a woman. Stand the thing on the butt and have a careful look at it. The nicely curved, slightly bulging forearm blends down to the thin little receiver, which expands up to the full-sized buttstock. It makes me think 36-24-36. Whoever drew up the design was an artist.

And since form should follow function, the good looks wouldn't be worth anything if the gun didn't shoot. It's got that covered too. It's one fun little booger to shoot. It might not have benchrest match rifle accuracy, but then that's not its purpose, and it DOES have plenty of accuracy to do anything a 22 hunting rifle was ever intended to do.

I have a 1959 Belgian-made grade 1 that I wouldn't sell for any price. It's one of my all time favorite guns.

Randy
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  #10  
Old 08-03-2003, 08:58 PM
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Jaywalker

Got back from the range about 3:00 pm; Everything was fired with open sights (stock Browning) from 50 yds. All are groups of 5 shots from a bench rest using my left hand as a front bag. I incorrectly thought there were sand bags at the range. No rear bag was used.

Winchester Super X Hi Velocity (X22LR)
Best group- 1.75"
Worst and first group- 2.90"

CCI Std Velocity (0032)
Best group- 2.00"
Worst group- 3.25"

Lapua Super Club
Best group- 2.25"
Worst group- 3.10"

The Lapua is expensive and it stinks (smells bad). I also had one stovepipe with the Lapua.

25 rounds of each were fired before I started measuring to get the barrel used to the particular round.

Trigger is clean and crisp. Average of 10 pulls; 3lbs,2oz.

Hope this helps and you owe me $6.00 for range fees. hehehe

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Old 08-04-2003, 08:53 AM
Jaywalker
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fullchoke,

Thanks, that's a nice quantitative report. It sounds to me as if the rifle is pretty accurate, given the open sights and lack of sandbags. I was actually surprised to see the relatively light trigger pull, also. I appreciate your effort.

As for range fees - I'm sure you hated every minute of the test, so if you're in the DC area, email me and we'll go to the Fairfax Rod and Gun Club. Lots of ranges, and usually pretty empty.

I took my AR-7 out there yesterday to see if it had improved with age. It's still (surprisingly) reliable, and more accurate than I am with a handgun at 50 yards, but, except for the coolness of its collapsibilty, not much fun to look at, hold, or shoot. I want something nicer that's collapsible. Still kicking tires about what it will be, and you've given me some good data. Thanks again.

Jaywalker
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  #12  
Old 08-04-2003, 07:39 PM
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Jaywalker, about the

trigger; I was surprised as well. But I checked the gauge on two centerfire rifle triggers that have been "smith set" @ 3#. Gauge checked out accurate.

I'm wondering if the new ATD's would be as light due to lawyer triggers. Keep in mind this one is 40 years old. Back when for the most part, we were responsible for our own actions.

Thanks for the invite. Fairfax is a nice town, or was 30 years ago. That's a bit of a trip to shoot. Keep the six bucks as this was a chore I relished. If you're ever in the Ozarks, e-mail me and we can go the range or to the farm and thin out the tree rat population.

Good luck on your decision.
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Old 08-29-2003, 10:04 AM
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I've been following this thread for awhile now and I agree with all of the thoughtful comments previously posted. I'd just like to add that the Remington model 24/241 rifles produced from 1922 to shortly after WWII, were also based on the Browning .22 auto design and share many of it's fine attributes. The Remington 24/241 have some screws in the action that John Browning abhored which make the Browning/FN rifles a great vehicle for the engravers art. Also, the profile of the action on the Remingtons is a bit meatier, but the Remington 24/241s tend to be a better fit for an adult shooter, especially the Remington model 241. Another advantage of the Remingtons is that they tend to go for much less that the Browning/FNs for used examples. Just beware of the well worn .22SH gallery versions.
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  #14  
Old 08-29-2003, 10:24 AM
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Brown/Miroku 22 automatic ...

I have two of these fancy little rifles and like then as good as my Winchester 61, 62A and 63.

Don't over tighten the barrel to receiver adjustment, it just needs to be snug.

Both of my rifles are drilled and tapped, on the barrel, for cantilever scope mount bases. Both Burris and Weaver make bases for this mount system.

Burris says, in their catalog and on their website, their scope base is steel. Don't believe them. The base is anodized aluminum as Weavers is.

The Burris rings are made of steel and look really nice on the rifle. I think much nicer looking than the Weaver rings.

Bill
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  #15  
Old 08-29-2003, 10:38 AM
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Re: looks like a woman

Quote:
Originally posted by rdonges


<snip>

The lines of the little gun are artwork. Its shape reminds me of a woman. Stand the thing on the butt and have a careful look at it. The nicely curved, slightly bulging forearm blends down to the thin little receiver, which expands up to the full-sized buttstock. It makes me think 36-24-36.
You pervert! It would be at least a 38-22-36.

Quote:

Whoever drew up the design was an artist.
John Moses Browning ... Was a great artist in metal and wood.

Quote:

And since form should follow function, the good looks wouldn't be worth anything if the gun didn't shoot. It's got that covered too. It's one fun little booger to shoot.
You shoot boogers too?

Quote:

It might not have benchrest match rifle accuracy, but then that's not its purpose, and it DOES have plenty of accuracy to do anything a 22 hunting rifle was ever intended to do.
If I do my part, both of my brownings, scoped with Leupold M8 6X42AO scopes will average about .75 inch groups at 50 yards.


Quote:

I have a 1959 Belgian-made grade 1 that I wouldn't sell for any price. It's one of my all time favorite guns.

Randy
Randy is absolutly right about the Browning 22, except for the size notation above of course.

Bill
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