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  #1  
Old 11-25-2019, 12:16 PM
pblanc

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Defective Ruger synthetic stock



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I recently purchased one of these "optics ready" Ruger 10/22s:

https://grabagun.com/ruger-10-22-car...nch-10rds.html

As shown in the photo, it comes with an 18.5" tapered barrel with a dull, blued finish and no front or rear sight. The standard Ruger combo Weaver/dovetail accessory rail is premounted on the receiver.

The synthetic stock is more of a "sporter" style with no barrel band and molded checkering at the pistol grip and the fore-end. The one I got came with a light grey stock as shown in the link, but Ruger has also molded this stock in charcoal. Both the grey and charcoal stocks are said to be limited-production runs.

That's good because the stock I got is defective in that there is insufficient clearance in the width of the cut out at the bottom of the stock for the safety to clear even if it is perfectly centered as the barreled action in removed. I did not appreciate this fact the first time I removed the barreled action. The safety lever gets trapped between the sides of the cut out, and as you lift the action by the barrel, the safety lever gets rotated.

Anyone who has experienced the rotated safety lever phenomenon knows it to be a PITA. The cocked hammer cannot be released by the trigger because there is no clearance for the sear extension. The hammer needs to be removed by pushing out the hammer pin while the hammer is tensioned by the hammer spring. At least for me, rotating the safety back into the proper functional orientation requires near complete disassembly of the trigger group.

After fixing the safety lever, I put the barreled action back in the stock and realized the problem when I did so. So I took it back out so I could relieve the cut out with files and sandpaper, but as I took the action out the second time, sure enough the safety lever got rotated again.

I post this in case anybody happened to buy the same model. It is possible that the problem was limited to the rifle I bought, but if these stocks all come out of the same mold, others might well experience the same problem.

Shame on Ruger for allowing a stock like this to get out of the assembly room. Even if my stock is a one-off, I think the problem should have been recognized upon assembly.
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  #2  
Old 11-25-2019, 03:29 PM
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Mine did the same thing. I just spun the safety around till it snapped back in place. Not a big deal at all. Didn’t even take the trigger group off the receiver.
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Old 11-25-2019, 03:44 PM
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I made many attempts to turn the safety by hand.

If the safety gets turned sufficiently that the detent pops into the step that is cut for the sear extension, which happened to me in both cases, it is difficult to turn the safety cylinder unless the detent ball is pushed in with some thin, narrow tool. That was also the experience of the individual who started this thread:

https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forum...d.php?t=364809

Here is a short article that describes the problem and has good photos of the pertinent parts:

https://1022companion.wordpress.com/...-safety-turns/


If the safety has only rotated a bit and the detent ball is depressed in and is riding on the cylindrical part of the safety, and you turn the safety the right way, it is easy to rotate it back. If the safety has turned enough that the detent has popped into the flat cut out for the sear extension, because of the completely flat surface, it is difficult to get the detent ball depressed back in by turning the safety unless you can depress the ball.

Last edited by pblanc; 11-25-2019 at 03:52 PM.
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Old 11-25-2019, 03:47 PM
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Originally Posted by pblanc View Post
...Shame on Ruger for allowing a stock like this to get out of the assembly room. ...I think the problem should have been recognized upon assembly.
Really? Nobody's perfect and we are talking a bit of extra material. Most of the stocks are tight, on purpose. This doesn't rise to the level of burning Ruger at the stake.
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Old 11-25-2019, 03:55 PM
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I did 4 trigger jobs/4 rifles for a Buddy on this same rifle.. fresh out of the box. As said the clearance is nada/zilch for the Safety and in the mid-position it rubs the sides of the stock and rotates it to a unsafe/nonfunctional position... all that is ditto/said before... YUPP.. it sucks but a small file and 2 minutes will fix that problem.. I did it FOUR times... it takes MORE time to get the safety rotated back however. So much for Ruger's ability to make sure these rifles are up to snuff before they leave the building... I pitty the Folks that don't understand whats going on the 1st time they pull the barreled action and this happens... not cool Ruger. Someone with more time than me needs to CALL RUGER!
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Old 11-25-2019, 04:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jammer22 View Post
Really? Nobody's perfect and we are talking a bit of extra material. Most of the stocks are tight, on purpose. This doesn't rise to the level of burning Ruger at the stake.
This was not a matter of the safety just dragging a little as the action came out. In order to get the action out, the safety lever actually had to force the sides of the stock cut out apart to come out. I had to remove a considerable amount of polymer with files and sandpaper to allow the trigger group to clear properly.

You may think that acceptable. I do not. If you do, you are free to go out and buy a dozen of these rifles.

I posted this in hopes of sparing someone who has an identical stock trouble, not to burn Ruger at the stake. But a stock that renders the trigger group non-functional the first time the action is removed from the stock is defective, pure and simple.
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Old 11-25-2019, 04:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pblanc View Post
This was not a matter of the safety just dragging a little as the action came out. In order to get the action out, the safety lever actually had to force the sides of the stock cut out apart to come out. I had to remove a considerable amount of polymer with files and sandpaper to allow the trigger group to clear properly.

You may think that acceptable. I do not. If you do, you are free to go out and buy a dozen of these rifles.

I posted this in hopes of sparing someone who has an identical stock trouble, not to burn Ruger at the stake. But a stock that renders the trigger group non-functional the first time the action is removed from the stock is defective, pure and simple.
Atta Boy! We share.. both good and BAD.

I did the same thing back on 11/5 in this thread ... https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forum...1170365&page=2
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  #8  
Old 11-25-2019, 04:22 PM
pblanc

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[QUOTE=Chaser;11682415]I did 4 trigger jobs/4 rifles for a Buddy on this same rifle.. fresh out of the box. As said the clearance is nada/zilch for the Safety and in the mid-position it rubs the sides of the stock and rotates it to a unsafe/nonfunctional position... all that is ditto/said before... YUPP.. it sucks but a small file and 2 minutes will fix that problem.. I did it FOUR times... it takes MORE time to get the safety rotated back however. So much for Ruger's ability to make sure these rifles are up to snuff before they leave the building... I pitty the Folks that don't understand whats going on the 1st time they pull the barreled action and this happens... not cool Ruger. Someone with more time than me needs to CALL RUGER![/QUOTEI

I actually did call Ruger CS today and described this problem. The woman I spoke to said this was the first time she heard of the problem, but was very pleasant and said she would pass it along to the appropriate people. I suggested strongly that someone in the assembly room grab a few of these stocks and measure the width of the stock cut out in comparison with the width of the safety cylinder. In my case, I believe that the cut out was a full .2" narrower than the transverse width of the safety cylinder. It also seemed that there was some taper to the cut out so that it was not of uniform width, but narrowed toward the top. So it looked from the bottom exterior that the centered safety lever would just clear, but then it got squeezed higher up in the cut out.

Last edited by pblanc; 11-25-2019 at 04:27 PM.
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  #9  
Old 11-26-2019, 03:33 PM
pblanc

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I posted the following in the other thread pertaining to the issue of inadequate safety clearance that I experienced with one light grey stock, and Chaser experienced with four charcoal stocks of the same type.

I measured the width of the stock cut out on my grey stock at the location that the safety has to pass through to remove the barreled action. Please take note of the fact that this measurement is AFTER I removed a significant amount of polymer with files and sand paper to provide a minimal amount of clearance to allow the action to be removed without breaking the trigger assembly group.

The width of the cut out on my modified grey stock is now .875". I'm sorry I did not measure it before I widened it, but I am quite sure that I enlarged it by a minimum of .1" in width and quite possibly more. If so, the original width of the cut out was less than .800"

Compare that to the width of the cut out on the unmodified birch carbine stock that came with my model 1103 10/22 which measures .925" in width, and that of the black synthetic carbine stock that came on a model 1151 which measures .900.

The total width of the safety cylinder on the 10/22 measures .906".

The upshot is that the grey stock I bought was seriously out of spec and Chaser's experience shows that this was not a fluke and the problem exists in both colors this stock comes in. Since it is quite likely that all of these stocks come out of the same mold, I would not be surprised to find that all stocks of this type are out of spec.

If you bought a stock of this type, check the clearance before you insert a barreled action and modify it if necessary. If you bought a complete rifle of model number 31145 or (charcoal) or 31139 (light grey) I would suggest that the first time you remove the barreled action do so with the hammer uncocked. That will at least mean you won't have to fight a cocked hammer that you cannot release if the safety gets rotated.

Try to remove the barreled action as gently as possible in as vertical a direction as possible to avoid rotating the safety. The safety will want to get rotated in a clockwise direction, looking at the trigger group from the right side. After removing the barreled action check very carefully to see if your safety lever has lost its "detents". If it has, try rotating it back in a counterclockwise direction, looking at it from the right side.

Apart from the issue with the inadequate safety clearance, this seems like a decent stock. It is significantly less chunky at the fore-end forward of the magazine well than the birch carbine stock and the molded checkering is nice. Although it is somewhat similar in shape to the wooden sporter stock, it still has the concave butt plate of the carbine types rather than the straighter, more vertical butt plate of the sporters.

In answer to the length of pull question, the LOP on this stock seems to be identical to that of the carbine models, right around 13.5".
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  #10  
Old 11-27-2019, 04:50 PM
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Read after, unfortunately

Same thing happened to me with model 31145, couldn't immediately figure out why trigger would not work. Short on time, just dropped in a spare trigger group. That one works OK but I will baby it when I change barrel and put in into a different stock. Arrgh, new problem to solve.
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Old 11-27-2019, 05:29 PM
pblanc

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The stock is not difficult to modify but expect it to take more than just a few swipes with sandpaper to do it. I have now enlarged the cut out on mine to a width of .900". To do that took two sessions with files and sandpaper of around 10-12 minutes each, but I did not use a very coarse file.
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Old 12-11-2019, 07:38 PM
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I read this whole thread before I picked mine up, so I was ready for it. But apparently not ready enough. As careful as I could be, I still rotated the safety, and it was a PIB to get it back. I was able to rotate it back without full disassembly, but not easily. I put the stock in the mill and took about .0015 off each side, and it works fine. Crazy that Ruger doesn't catch this. I also took a fair amount of rust off the bolt while it was apart, and milled a crazy casting nub off the back of the bolt that was so bad it almost kept it from cocking.

Without some minor gunsmithing, this really isn't a usable firearm out of the box.
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Old 12-12-2019, 07:49 AM
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Ok this may make me look like a dummy, won't be the first time 😁 what do you mean by rotated the safety? I have also seen the suggestion to drop the hammer prior to removing the action, I assume this means pull the trigger prior to removing the action?
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Old 12-12-2019, 09:38 AM
pblanc

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Ok this may make me look like a dummy, won't be the first time �� what do you mean by rotated the safety? I have also seen the suggestion to drop the hammer prior to removing the action, I assume this means pull the trigger prior to removing the action?
You have to know what the safety on the 10/22 looks like to fully understand. The safety is basically a metal cylinder. On the top side of the safety cylinder there is a flat bottomed step cutout on one side. You can probably see this if you look down into the trigger assembly. There is a downward extension of the sear that tips a bit further downward as the trigger is pulled. When the safety is disengaged, the sear extension goes down into this cut out. When the safety is "on" the sear extension hits the cylindrical portion of the safety and won't allow the sear to release the hammer.

On the bottom of the safety cylinder, the side you don't usually see, there are two notches cut into the cylinder. There is a spring and and plunger detent that fit into the bottom of the trigger assembly. The detent plunger fits into one or the other of these notches depending on whether the safety is engaged or disengaged. If you remove the trigger/sear/disconnect group you can just see the tip of the plunger at the back underside of the safety. It is these notches and this detent spring and plunger that give the safety its positive "clicks". So long as the safety is either "on" or "off" the detent plunger is pushed into one of the notches and provides a fair amount of resistance to retard rotation of the safety cylinder. With the sear removed if there was no detent spring and plunger, you would be able to freely rotate the safety cylinder.



When you center the safety cylinder to remove the barreled action, the detent plunger now rides on the portion of the safety cylinder between the two notches. In this position if offers little resistance to prevent the safety rotating. It is possible for the safety cylinder to rotate just enough to prevent the sear from releasing but not all the way upside down. But if it rotates enough, the detent plunger now drops into and contacts the flat of the sear extension cut out. And in that position it can be pretty difficult to rotate the safety cylinder back into the proper position.

Last edited by pblanc; 12-12-2019 at 09:42 AM.
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  #15  
Old 12-12-2019, 01:22 PM
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if you ever do have to reinstall a safety and it's associated hardware, I can't recommend the Gunsmither Safe-T Tool enough
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