Barrel "warm up" - RimfireCentral.com Forums

Go Back   RimfireCentral.com Forums > >

Notices

Join Team RFC to remove these ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-11-2019, 10:05 AM
lasttombstone
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Feb 2018
Location: 
North Carolina
Posts: 
594
TPC Rating: 
100% (2)
Barrel "warm up"



Log in to see fewer ads
Realizing that there are different opinions but just asking what some of them are. In an attempt to save on the "good ammunition" is there an advantage or disadvantage to using a "lesser" ammunition to warm up with prior to shooting for score? If doing that, do you swab the bore prior to changing ammunition then shoot some seasoning rounds?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11-11-2019, 10:32 AM
Sophia's Avatar
Sophia

That Evil Admin Lady
Join Date: 
Dec 2006
Location: 
Raggedy Edge of the 'Verse
Posts: 
22,073
TPC Rating: 
100% (23)
I don't think there is an advantage. Maybe even a disadvantage.

The bullet going down the barrel now is riding on the residue left behind by the previous bullet.... including the lube which is a big part of the difference between the high-dollar ammo and other loads.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-11-2019, 10:52 AM
1dogdown
US Marines Veteran

Join Date: 
Dec 2015
Location: 
Wi.Rapids.Wi.
Posts: 
913
TPC Rating: 
100% (16)
With temps only reaching the 30s.I just run a mag of the intended ammo I plan to shoot.Not like .22 ammo is 2.00 a round.Besides by the time you clean the bbl.Its already cooled down in these temps.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #4  
Old 11-11-2019, 11:00 AM
prairie maggot
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Jun 2012
Location: 
Salt Lake City, UT
Posts: 
191
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
I am not familiar with all ammo within an individual brand, but for what I am familiar with, Lapua uses their own lubricant. So as long as you warm up using a lower cost Lapua, you should be OK to move up to a higher performance Lapua without a problem. The same would be true for Eley. For example: warm up with Lapua Standard Plus and then shoot with Lapua Midas. The problem mostly comes when you "cross contaminate" by warming up with one brand and then switching brands. For example: warming up with Lapua Standard Plus and then switching to RWS R50. Burt
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-11-2019, 11:21 AM
Gumshoe
Law Enforcement Officer NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
May 2012
Location: 
Chico, CA
Posts: 
242
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sophia View Post
I don't think there is an advantage. Maybe even a disadvantage.

The bullet going down the barrel now is riding on the residue left behind by the previous bullet.... including the lube which is a big part of the difference between the high-dollar ammo and other loads.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11-11-2019, 11:28 AM
SavagePlinker

Join Date: 
Sep 2015
Posts: 
2,160
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Quote:
Originally Posted by lasttombstone View Post
Realizing that there are different opinions but just asking what some of them are. In an attempt to save on the "good ammunition" is there an advantage or disadvantage to using a "lesser" ammunition to warm up with prior to shooting for score? If doing that, do you swab the bore prior to changing ammunition then shoot some seasoning rounds?
No swabbing, I just shoot a few rounds. Unfortunately, they have to be the same ammo or it does not work.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11-11-2019, 10:27 PM
Carpfisher2
US Army Veteran NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Sep 2012
Posts: 
109
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Assuming we are talking about "heavy" match barreled guns.
Assuming the sole reason for "warming up the barrel" is that the steel reacts to the temperature increase by moving in some direction;
Is anybody aware of any engineering studies conducted with how much the muzzle move per degree/ of temperature rise? This could be done with dial indicators,, thermocouples, etc.
Questions that my engineering can't help asking:
How much does the barrel temperature increase per fired round?
How much does the muzzle move based solely on temperature increase?
At what temperature increase/round count does the barrel stabilize?
Does the barrel stabilize?
What is the frequency of fire required to maintain the "perfect" temperature?
If you fire too fast or frequently can you exceed the temperature for a stable barrel, leading to tube droop, as we called in my Army Tanker days?

Or maybe we should shoot the engineer and just enjoy shooting!
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-12-2019, 09:32 AM
tomon
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Apr 2014
Location: 
Bethel Park, Pa
Posts: 
577
TPC Rating: 
100% (12)
Talking Just hook up your "10s" unit up!

put a pad next to the receiver and the other one out by the front sight. That'll warm the barrel! You may need to experiment a bit...................
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11-12-2019, 11:32 PM
Toomany22s's Avatar
Toomany22s
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Sep 2017
Posts: 
4,078
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Well I used to shoot the cheap ammo first and then th better ammo. But one day, being cantankerous, i switched and shot the betterammo first. Not only were the better ammo groups better, so were the cheap ammo groups too! I think that greasy lube on the better ammo makes the cheaper ammo shoot better. And for me the first groups always are best.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 11-13-2019, 09:19 AM
timberbeast's Avatar
timberbeast
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Jun 2007
Location: 
The piney woods of south Arkansas
Posts: 
39,775
TPC Rating: 
100% (39)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sophia View Post
I don't think there is an advantage. Maybe even a disadvantage.

The bullet going down the barrel now is riding on the residue left behind by the previous bullet.... including the lube which is a big part of the difference between the high-dollar ammo and other loads.
I have to agree with the very knowledgeable young lady, which, over time, I I have learned to listen to carefully.

Even with premium ammo, the cost of a magazine shot to "warm up" the barrel is less than $3. And what is your shooting time worth? Spend the money and warm up your barrel and leade with the same ammo you will shoot for score.

Don't go cheap on yourself, range time is too valuable.
__________________
Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. - C.S. Lewis
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 11-13-2019, 11:31 AM
catbird's Avatar
catbird
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Mar 2002
Location: 
Louisiana
Posts: 
648
TPC Rating: 
100% (10)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sophia View Post
I don't think there is an advantage. Maybe even a disadvantage.



The bullet going down the barrel now is riding on the residue left behind by the previous bullet.... including the lube which is a big part of the difference between the high-dollar ammo and other loads.


Ditto!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
__________________
Eschew Obfuscation
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 11-13-2019, 12:07 PM
DWS

Join Date: 
Apr 2007
Location: 
SW MI
Posts: 
48
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
barrel warm up

Barrel temp does matter. it is a big factor with match accuracy wit 22 rf barrels
(I have no experience with the jacketed bullets used with 22WRM or the 17s)
I've shot 22 rf benchrest (ASSRA Matches) for years. We shoot outdoors, from early spring to late fall, in bench matches at 100 and 200 yards with the best ammo money could buy. Early or late in the season, on the range in northern Indiana we could have 1st relay matches with temps you could see your breath in and at 2 or 3 in the afternoon temps might be pushing 70 or more. In a few memorable early spring match we had snow on the ground and snow in the air.

the film of waxy lube coating the lands and the grooves is highly subject to temperature----think of your butter dish in your kitchen--impossible to spread fresh from the fridge and a puddle impossible to spread on a hot day with no AC. Pushing a bullet down a cold barrel REALLY slows the bullet down----even of the best ammo. Once the barrel has warmed up and the lube coating is softer and slicker it'll travel a lot faster.

With my heavy barrel (30"x1 1/2" octagonal) 200 yard benchrest 22 rf, out of a cold barrel, the bullet would hit close to a foot low on a cold windless morning. at 100 yards the drop would be less of course. My other match rifles with less mass-weight barrels would heat up and also cool back down faster.
Normally I'd just keep shooting on a sighter target and watch the bullets "walk" up and over the the impact point for that sight setting. the number of shots would vary depending on conditions.
I always wanted to get some sort of stick on temperature sensing pads hooked to a device that would let me calculate the temps as i was going through the process. but never did.

Changing ammo brands just adds a whole bunch of unknown and inconsistent factors due to the differences in lube mixture and application. Even changing match ammo brands required cleaning all the lube out of the barrel and re-lubing by firing the different ammo until the barrel was re-lubed. A rule of thumb most of us used was as that in a squeaky-clean un-lubed barrel each shot would grease about 3-4 inches of barrel----you could see the groups shift and tighten as the re-lubing progressed.

I did find that Bi-athalon/Winter 22 match ammo worked better-- I think the lube must be adjusted to have a functional lubricity wider range of temperature but its more expensive of course.
We shot a 45 min relay with a 15 min break to pull and post targets. Even with mu rifles warmed up I learned to use chamber and muzzle plugging Safety "flags" to help the barrel hold its temperature on cooler days It would drop some and take four or 5 shots to get back-up to "accurate temps". but a lot longer if I waited out a relay or forgot to plug both ends.

Barrels mass and ambient temps will vary, as will different brands and types of ammo. Off hand I'd say that on "normal comfortable" shooting temps say 60-80 or so that temperature won't have that big factor. I routinely started every relay with half a dozen shots onto a sighter target
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 11-13-2019, 12:09 PM
gcrank1's Avatar
gcrank1

Join Date: 
Apr 2018
Location: 
south central WI, USA
Posts: 
3,500
TPC Rating: 
100% (3)
Dont overthink this, dance with who ya brung and when you feel like you and the gun have settled down shoot for score .
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 11-13-2019, 12:18 PM
Piexcel
US Army Veteran

Join Date: 
Oct 2019
Location: 
Gallivanting around USA
Posts: 
17
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
When I shoot different types of ammo trying to figure out what my rifle likes, I always swab the bore before switching to a different ammo make. When I figure out what my rifle likes, I just shoot that ammo.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 11-14-2019, 07:39 PM
bberg7794

Join Date: 
Sep 2011
Location: 
New York's North Country
Posts: 
424
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
Re: barrel warm-up

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWS View Post
...I routinely started every relay with half a dozen shots onto a sighter target
I was taught, before beginning a match, to shoot 10 rounds downrange into the backstop and not into the target. This serves to eliminate a cold bore flyer from a clean barrel, to warm-up the barrel, and to settle the shooter. I definitely use the same ammo that I am using in the match. After switching targets and positions, I shoot a few shots into the sighter bull again, mostly to check NPA, but also to rewarm the barrel. I shoot prone and position matches.

Last edited by bberg7794; 11-14-2019 at 07:49 PM. Reason: Added quote
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:59 AM.

Privacy Policy

DMCA Notice

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2000-2018 RimfireCentral.com
x