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Old 05-23-2018, 11:27 PM
62Ranger13
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Hungarian bread



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Do you enjoy European crusty bread, the kind with the chewy center? If so, then you will love the following recipe. All credit goes to Magdi. I have only added extra info where I needed it. You may need it as well, unless you are adept in the kitchen, then you won’t. Having said that, don’t be intimidated. This is a straight forward recipe with outstanding results. I have baked this bread 13 times so far, all with stellar reviews, usually for holidays, birthdays etc.
Before beginning I would suggest reviewing Magdi’s video on YouTube: Easy Bread Making by Magdi
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6DBmQckQNG0

Magdi’s Hungarian bread
3 ¼ cups bread flour (I use King Arthur flour, fluff flour with a fork, scoop out and level with the back of a knife before pouring into bowl, otherwise you get too much flour, ergo dense bread)
1 ½ cups warm water (about a minute in the microwave. If you can’t hold your finger in the water for 10 seconds it is too hot and might kill the yeast)
1 tsp coarse salt
1 tsp dry yeast (I use Fleischmann’s active dry yeast)
1 Tbsp grapeseed oil
---
In a large bowl, add the flour first. Next add the salt to one side of the flour and the yeast to the opposite side. This is so you don’t kill the yeast by direct contact with the salt. Mix very well. I use a fork; there’s probably a better utensil for it.
Add warm water and oil to the flour mixture. Be careful—do not overmix; however, mix well, but not too much. You can “feel” it collect when it comes together. Cover with plastic wrap, place it in a warm spot and wait 2 hours. This is the first rise. (I turn my oven on to 200 degrees F for about 10 minutes, then turn it off. Place the bowl of dough on the stovetop. Makes a nice warm place for the rise.)
Transfer the dough to a clean bowl and place it in the refrigerator. It ‘can’ be refrigerated at a minimum of 1 hour, but I like to let it rest overnight. Be sure the container lid is not on tight, but that an edge is unseated, meaning gas can escape.

After the rest period in the fridge, dust your hands with flour and lightly coat the cutting board with flour. Pull dough from the container and place it on the cutting board. Using a very sharp knife, cut dough in half. Shape each loaf. Cut a pattern in the top of the loaf. I use two deep diagonal cuts. Lightly sprinkle a bit of flour over the top of the bread and remove the excess flour from the parchment paper. Magdi’s instructions call for a Dutch oven. I don’t have two Dutch ovens so I use a standard bread pan (9 ¼ x 5 ¼ x 2 ¾ in) in addition to the Dutch oven. This means one loaf is shaped round, for the Dutch oven, and the other loaf is shaped rectangular. My Dutch oven is the Pioneer Woman, Timeless Beauty one. Perfect size! Got mine at Wally Mart.

Place parchment paper in the Dutch oven and the loaf pan. Magdi’s video shows how to cut it for best fit. Watching the video is easier than me trying to explain it in words. Place the round loaf in the Dutch oven and the other loaf in the standard bread pan.
Now for the second rise, place the bread pans in a warm area, cover the dough, and wait 45 minutes.
After 25 minutes into the second rise, I pre-heat the oven to 425 deg. Fahrenheit (20 minutes pre-heat). Important step here: place another bread pan filled with water on the bottom rack of the oven at this point in time.
After the double rise and when the oven is brought up to temperature, place the Dutch oven and the other bread loaf pan in the oven, center rack. Make sure the Dutch oven’s lid is ON. Bake for 30 minutes. Remove the Dutch oven lid and bake for an additional 3 minutes. Then, remove the bread loaf pan and continue baking the Dutch oven loaf an additional 10 minutes. Remove the Dutch oven from the oven, remove the bread loaf and let both loaves cool on a wire rack for 1 hour. You’ll be greeted by a beautiful aroma, plus you can hear the crust crackle while it’s cooling to whet your appetite.

Enjoy!

I could eat this with a pound of butter. I “could”, but I “shouldn’t”, but I have. Don’t be me.

Interesting. I just re-watched the video and I could have made one loaf all along. Her instructions are for either a Dutch oven OR a bread pan. All I have to say for myself is that if you split the dough like I have been doing then you will get two smaller loaves. Which is to say, twice as many gifts; or you can surreptitiously proof one of the loaves to make sure “it ain’t poisoned” and then give away the other one. That’s what I often do.

Legalese:
NOTE: Your oven may heat differently than mine. The times I have listed are from trial and error and are perfect for my oven. YMMV.

CAUTION: items removed from oven may be hot. Use oven mitts as appropriate. If the items are not hot maybe bread baking is not your thing. Maybe you should sit on the back porch with ole Ranger, shoot some .22’s and spin some yarns with me.

WARNING: Not responsible for addiction to this recipe, inevitable gain in girth and death by goodness.
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  #2  
Old 05-23-2018, 11:48 PM
scooter22
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Thanks. We'll give it a try. Bread really has a lot of variations around the world. My side is German/Irish and my wife Italian/Sicilian. Yes there's a difference. But we have quite a few bread recipes and willing to try another. Warm bread is good stuff!
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Old 05-24-2018, 12:03 AM
62Ranger13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scooter22 View Post
Bread really has a lot of variations around the world.
Indeed. My daughter likes to experiment with different country origins of bread. You should add Hong Kong Pai Bao, Hokkaido milk bread to your list as well. It's an amazingly soft, velvety bread. She tries a bit of everything and I tend to stick with one bread recipe in the hopes of perfection.
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Old 05-24-2018, 12:18 AM
scooter22
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"Bread" is really a wide term name for many things. I remember usings a simple mix that I think was called Trail Bread or something like that. It was, I think 3 ingrediances that you mixed and kept dry. Then mixed with water to make a gummy paste and stuck to the end of a stick and cooked over a open fire. I remember eating that on hunting/camping trips. You could mix in what you had. Wasn't Gourmet or as good as bakery but darn good on a cold outing.
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