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  #1  
Old 12-29-2015, 02:52 PM
matchman

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Help selecting a Don Stith stock for Stock Suhl 150



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What am I looking for is a stock suited for only Benchrest competion that allows front rest and bags (no one piece rests front and back)
So the stock needs to ride the bags well.
Am I describing IR 50/50 ....IBS ??????
I also would like to have the option of more than 1 class to shoot in (if getting the lightest stock will help with that).
The Rifle is a Suhl 150-1 , scope Weaver or Sightron 36x,harell tuner, I intend to use the original barrel for now. (also should the barrel Chanel inlet be done larger for a future replacement barrel?)
Right now I shoot in a small club (won the leage for one season and lost interest) only rule is no one piece rests and 22lr.
I'm thinking of pursuing some type of larger venue sanctioned benchrest events.
Just not sure where I'm limited to equipment wise? And what stock to choose.(I do not want to limit my self further choosing style and weight wrong)
Thanks for any replies!

Last edited by matchman; 12-29-2015 at 02:56 PM.
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  #2  
Old 12-29-2015, 04:38 PM
kseatm
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Not sure which particular style of Don's you'd want, but you mention weight being an issue. So...

Take your barreled action and weigh it. Then add in whatever weight the Harrel tuner is (I'm thinking ~8-8.5 oz but not sure), scope of choice (The T's run around 17 oz or so), rings, bases if used, etc. Then figure a few ounces more to allow for bedding, action screws, trigger guard, buttplate if used.

That should get you in the ballpark. Whatever you do, allow some wiggle room.

I would recommend having that barrel channel bigger to allow other barrels going forward. Most of the BR stocks are designed with this in mind anyway.

If you're looking at IR, you're going to need to make 10.5 lbs. That doesn't give you much wiggle room as to scopes, aftermarket barrels, or types of wood used on the stock. Different woods weigh different amounts, even those woods of the same family.

For me, 32 oz always seemed to be a good number to go for with a stock. But whatever you do, when you order this thing, make sure the number you need is what the stock weighs before you buy it. If its more, you're going to have to drill out wood, reshape, etc just to try and make weight.

Don has some nice designs. Get with him and he can point you in the right direction as to styles and such.

Good luck

Kenny
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Old 12-29-2015, 05:53 PM
matchman

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Thank you. Actually don emailed me and is working with me. We are shooting for 10.5lb weight. I think that will be a big chalange with this long as original barrel.
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Old 12-30-2015, 06:38 AM
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Thomasconnor
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Flat Butt?

I had to decide which of Don's designs to buy. I went with his Wedge pattern because of the sloped butt stock (versus the straight buttstock).

I was aware of the straight buttstock probably being more optimal since upon recoil the stock stays level. This also means that all elevation adjustments are through the front rest. I owned one of these stocks and quickly realized I was born a bag squeezer. I want to be able to slide the rear bag fore and aft to control (elevation) point of aim versus turning a screw.

One would probably have more potential with a straight stock? On the other hand, at some point one must decide how much of the human element they want to remove to improve scores. Since I don't compete scores don't matter to me.

I would be interested in hearing more about butt shape...thanks...Tom
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Old 12-30-2015, 07:22 AM
kseatm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomasconnor View Post
I had to decide which of Don's designs to buy. I went with his Wedge pattern because of the sloped butt stock (versus the straight buttstock).

I was aware of the straight buttstock probably being more optimal since upon recoil the stock stays level. This also means that all elevation adjustments are through the front rest. I owned one of these stocks and quickly realized I was born a bag squeezer. I want to be able to slide the rear bag fore and aft to control (elevation) point of aim versus turning a screw.

One would probably have more potential with a straight stock? On the other hand, at some point one must decide how much of the human element they want to remove to improve scores. Since I don't compete scores don't matter to me.

I would be interested in hearing more about butt shape...thanks...Tom
You bring up a great point Tom. It makes sense that having a stock with a straight back end would help the gun track and shoot better. And I'm sure it does to an extent.

Personally have a couple like that. And a whole bunch that aren't.

Have one that when you pull the trigger, and watch the reticle, the thing never moves from the aiming point upon recoil. Looks perfect. You'd think it would shoot exceptionally. It doesn't. Heck, you've shot it!

Have had other high end stocks with sloped back ends. Some had the same angle as the bottom front, some had flat fronts and sloped backs, etc. None tracked such that the reticle never moved from the aiming point when fired. Heck, some would end up quite a ways away from where you were aiming once recoil was completed. All of them were some of the most accurate guns I've ever owned. And yes Tom, I think you've seen or shot some of them too!

In my mind, it seems a no brainer to have everything straight lined. Can't hurt. But, there's also the fact that a whole lot of world records and gobs of scores that boggle the mind that have been shot with stocks that aren't "straight lined".

One thing to keep in mind I think. No matter the stock design, there's a lot of other things that dictate as to how accurate the gun is.

JMO

Kenny
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Old 12-30-2015, 10:33 AM
matchman

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Don did recommend his 250 version with the flat/parallel butt.
It will be quite a change considering the original 3 position stock I have been using
Shot off the bench recoils back and off to the side with all the cast off
Built into the 3position stock.
You do have me thinking now because I also am a bag squeezer to.

Last edited by matchman; 12-30-2015 at 10:40 AM.
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Old 01-02-2016, 07:48 PM
ArtS
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I've got 2 of Don's stocks, and they both are very good. Both are the 250 design and in my opinion the best stock made for 22 BR today. One weighs less than 1.5 pounds, made from redwood and pawlonia laminate.

Buy a straightline, period. Its the state of the art and will improve your shooting. Works off a one piece or conventional setup. This isn't Centerfire with all its varmint classes and stocks. Generally anything goes except for weight classes. There are sporter classes, but the guns must be much lighter and stocks must be shaped differently. It will essentially require a different gun, and isn't shot by a lot of clubs. Build a competitive rifle for a 10.5 pound class with a straight line stock and you can shoot anywhere.
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Old 01-03-2016, 05:49 PM
matchman

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Originally Posted by ArtS View Post
I've got 2 of Don's stocks, and they both are very good. Both are the 250 design and in my opinion the best stock made for 22 BR today. One weighs less than 1.5 pounds, made from redwood and pawlonia laminate.

Buy a straightline, period. Its the state of the art and will improve your shooting. Works off a one piece or conventional setup. This isn't Centerfire with all its varmint classes and stocks. Generally anything goes except for weight classes. There are sporter classes, but the guns must be much lighter and stocks must be shaped differently. It will essentially require a different gun, and isn't shot by a lot of clubs. Build a competitive rifle for a 10.5 pound class with a straight line stock and you can shoot anywhere.
Thank you. That's basically what don told me.
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Old 01-10-2016, 10:02 AM
sofarfrome

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I know it is out of the ordinary but I have a toothpick with a Suhl and I love it.
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