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Old 09-28-2011, 12:12 PM
j.r. guerra in s. texas

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Old (pre 70's) sheath knife picture thread



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I've been finding a few old vintage sheath knifes and I don't see them pictured very often. I'll bet many of us have an older knife that just lies in the drawer - maybe letting it get some 'light' might be nice.

Western L88 (Heavy Duty?) and L39 Skinner knives. They've definitely been outdoors some.

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Old 09-28-2011, 02:36 PM
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Old Westerns... pretty cool with those split tangs. The only knife company that ever attempted that, let alone put them into production.

Here is one that is not of top quality, but has an interesting military history. It's an EG Waterman. Made during the second world war, as a private purchase combat knife. Lots of them served, especially early during the war, when there were not enough knives to go around for all the troops. Waterman liked to advertise that the knives would not break.. and it was hard to break them, because the steel was so **** soft as to be just barely usable. Really has only minor collector value, so many were made, and they were not issue. But this old vet is still serving, as best as it can, given the quality.

Good idea for a thread, JR

Phil


Last edited by greatscout; 09-28-2011 at 02:47 PM.
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Old 09-28-2011, 04:26 PM
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Not a great picture I knocked off a little of the pommel. Old Olsen Knife Co Solingen, Germany. Sheath was made along with a cross draw holster for my Walker Colt with matching belt & cartridge pouch.


Last edited by Tom-ADC; 09-28-2011 at 04:29 PM.
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Old 09-29-2011, 07:06 AM
j.r. guerra in s. texas

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Thanks greatscout, I think the idea is good too. Olde School is cool.

This is an Anton Wingem bowie knife. Tang stamp is Othello, the scales are stag, its a big knife, about 12" long and very robust blade. Its been stored pretty casually (witness condition of its sheath), so the blade has some character. Bought this in an Oklahoma City pawn shop a few years ago.



I believe this is a Hammer brand bowie knife. No marks, and the scales are delrin - looks pretty good to me. That blade is pretty light, the entire knife is approximately 8" long. Call it a cowboy bowie I guess.


Last edited by j.r. guerra in s. texas; 09-29-2011 at 07:13 AM.
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Old 09-29-2011, 11:53 AM
j.r. guerra in s. texas

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Japanese manufactured Vernco . . .

. . . very interesting handle, has a stainless steel bar through it. About 12" overall length, heavy leather flapped pouch sheath.



The right side here.



And closeup of that handle I mentioned above.

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Old 09-29-2011, 01:27 PM
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I like the Olsen... I have one similar to post. I bought it as a teenager in 1968, so these do qualify for posting here. I'm in Michigan, home to Olsen in Howard City. There are lots of Olsens still around in this state, lots of parts as well. There seemed go have been a lot of raiding of the company's dumpsters during their run. Lee Olsen was a pretty good knife guy, but according to knife lore, he was a drinker, and that led to the end of his company. Some very nice, distinctive knives came out of his factory, and they bring a good price when put up for sale-- more than they sold for new.

That Vernco is build very much like some of the company's folders, same kinda styling. One of the folders would make a nice compliment to it. Kitchen knives also make much same way. It was an American company, I recall, that imported their knives from Japan.

Sorry I always seem to have a comment about knives posted. Just that- to me- the knife is nothing but steel; to really appreciate it, one must know about it's history, who made it, how it was made, things like that. I am not trying to be a know-it-all, which I am most certainly not.
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Old 09-29-2011, 02:23 PM
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greatscout, small world I'm from MI also as is the Olsen. Still have family there.
Always nice to read a little history about knives.
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Old 09-29-2011, 05:04 PM
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Michigan misses you, Tom. I was squirrel hunting this morning, temp was 62 degrees and the squirrels were active. Stew tonight. Nice to meetcha.

Here is my own Olsen. As Tom proves, these were popular here in Michigan.
(Note: This was my first 'deer hunting knife. I have come to know that the smaller the knife, the more skilled and experienced the deer hunter is).



This is the Kinfolks M3 that my uncle carried as he toured Europe during the second world war.

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Old 09-29-2011, 05:04 PM
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No need to apologize sir . . .

. . . knife lore is a big part of collecting knives, its always nice to learn the story behind the item. I for one don't mind it a bit, I really appreciate the extra time it takes for you to type it out.
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Old 09-29-2011, 05:10 PM
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I live in No. Indiana and years ago when I was a teen I drove up 131 to Howard City and purchased a Lee Olsen knife from Lee himself. It was my carry knife for deer hunting for many years and field dressed and skinned many a deer.
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Old 09-30-2011, 07:13 AM
j.r. guerra in s. texas

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German Voss sheath knife . . .

. . . definitely wants to be a Nessmuk pattern knife, I'm pretty sure is 60's vintage. Thick stag handles that are beginning to seperate along the top. About 8" long.



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Old 10-03-2011, 07:14 AM
j.r. guerra in s. texas

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Ducks Unlimited Normark Presentation sheath knife. I think Fiskars is the manufacturer, but I have been unable to confirm that as fact.



Two Westerns, the top a BSA L66. The bottom a small shark military pattern.

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Old 10-03-2011, 04:56 PM
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Love the handle on that Normark. Nice.

JR's photo of the Western Shark and my pics of the WW2 era knives made me recall this sampling of wartime knife magazine knife ads. I ask your indulgence in showing a few of them here.

These ads were probably reassuring to the GIs fighting (they had access to magazines through the USO and other sources) and the homefront workers that sooner rather than later, the war would be over, and good times back again. Time for fighting men to return to field and stream, and the ads do, I think, play on the indominable American spirit that helped win the war. And good old American advertising--- "Hey, we were with you in the trenches, don't forget us when you return home and go camping!". Near the end of the war, and shortly after, there was a huge glut of knives made for fighting men, but suitable for outdoorsmen and these ads ran then, too, with little changes.



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Old 10-03-2011, 07:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by j.r. guerra in s. texas View Post
. . . very interesting handle, has a stainless steel bar through it...
You're right. Really interesting handle; looks to be an excellent grip shape, too.
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Old 10-04-2011, 07:13 AM
j.r. guerra in s. texas

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Strange grip indeed okedoke, I wonder why they went to so much trouble to do that? I do like that thumb depression though.

Greatscout, those are great ads! I don't think I've seen any of those, much obliged for adding them into this thread - they belong.

I think this knife is from WWII era. From the little I have found out about it, it is likely a German knife which was relabeled in England. Tang is stamped FOREIGN. Grips are gutta perch (?), with brass spacers in between. Its a medium heavy blade, about 1/8" at spine, and about 9" long overall.

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