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  #1  
Old 01-08-2020, 08:20 PM
Kragman

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Crosman Summit Ranger - who has one?



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I've been kicking the can on these for a while, because I'm looking for a good but inexpensive rifle for a project.

But I need to know if the rear sight is screwed to the barrel block or ???
Crosman can't tell me (called twice) and the internet has turned up nothing.

Also, I've seen 2 different sets of velocity specs for the rifles - .177 is either 1150 or 1400 with alloy pellets, .22's are either 950 or 1100 (alloy). It would be nice to know which is correct before I choose a caliber.

Thanks all
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Old 01-09-2020, 06:22 AM
56S

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I'll start by saying I don't own that particular model but....

Crosman/Benjamin likes to use off the shelf parts for many of their models. Knowing that, most if not all NP2 models should have similar power levels. 20-22 Lb/Ft of energy is common for these rifles. On a .22 using the 14.3 gr pellet one should see between 800-830 FPS at the muzzle. This is about where my Maximus PCP is and the 14.3 pellets remain stable.

As for the rear sight being mounted on the barrel block, I can't think of any break barrel rifles that aren't built that way. Pictures I see of the model in question show that the rear sight base is attached to the barrel and not the compression tube.

Two last points: 22 for fur and 177 for feathers seems to work best for most. I will add the higher velocity of my 177 Maximus gives a much more satisfying wallop sound than the higher powered bigger brother in 22. Accuracy wise the 177 may have the edge only because there are a better selection of pellets in that caliber.

And.....Don't use published velocities as a weighty factor in your decision to purchase. A slow hit is always better than a fast miss. I couldn't begin to really enjoy a break barrel until I detuned my D34 using a Maccarri spring and seal kit.

Hope this helps and please report back!
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  #3  
Old 01-09-2020, 07:44 AM
Kragman

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Thanks 56S

To elaborate a little, there's something fishy about the pics I see of the rear sight and its been very frustrating to get to the bottom of this. It really should be screwed on, but I need to know because I don't del like adding holes. I have a couple of guns that are drilled if it came to that.

The Summit Ranger is a bit unique though, and that makes it a great candidate for me:
1. I want a gas piston, NP2 is a plus
2. SR has the better version of the Crosman trigger, and easy enough to improve
3. Muzzle is threaded, and allows the front sight to be cleanly removed and Ann air stripper added.
4. If the rear sight IS screwed on, I will make up a simple short rail and mount a 2 or 3X EER scope directly over the barrel block, sort of scout rifle style. This will have 2 major advantages - a. the scope is now directly related to the barrel and lockup variation is irrelevant, and b. great setup for my scrappy old eyes!
5. I should be able to find a wood stock for it somewhere down the road if I decide I want one. In just not a plastic guy. I do think that the comb height will be good for a scout scope.

As far as caliber, if the .177s will handle a heavy pellet (maybe 10 grain?) around 1050 or so I would probably like that best.
Otherwise, I prefer .22, and if the SR will launch a 14.3 at 900 to 950 I would be pretty impressed. Might have to get one of each at that point... lol.
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  #4  
Old 01-09-2020, 08:04 AM
tmen52

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I will agree with the wisdom in 56S' reply. Especially the "published velocity" part, the manufacturers always use the lightest pellet for their testing to achieve the highest velocity numbers.
I would also suggest before your purchase to read any reviews you can on this particular model rifle - or other Crosman/Benjamin models with same power.
Check into a couple air gun online sites...GTA - GatewayToAirguns or AirgunNation and look for posts from others shooting the high powered Crosman models, those users may provide useful insight - hindsight helping your decision

I found in my of buying air rifles, that spending a little more (some a LOT more) is ALWAYS best, if you can afford to.
As for you mentioning "inexpensive as a project" there are better guns (RWS 34) that will offer higher quality and less frustration right out of the box for nearly same $.
My .02 cents.

** Had to go and check this model' cost …. $99 at AGD NOT the same model I thought we were talking about, Sorry. You will not find an RWS 34 that reasonable.

Last edited by tmen52; 01-09-2020 at 08:10 AM. Reason: price check
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  #5  
Old 01-09-2020, 09:07 AM
56S

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Excessive pellet velocity

In my limited experience 950 FPS is about the max before the pellet becomes unstable. This instability is due to the air around certain sections of the pellet becoming supersonic. Since the majority of a pellets stability is caused by airflow patterns and not rotation like our firearms, staying in the speed range where airflow is consistent produces the best accuracy.

I like your idea of mounting a scout scope on a break barrel. Having that darn hinge between the scope and muzzle just isn't good engineering. I'm surprised it works as well as it does. Although the major factor preventing a spring or gas ram gun from being accurate is the dwell time between trigger pull and the pellet leaving the muzzle. There's a whole lotta rockin and a rollin going on in that period. The NP2 design does help with that...at least on paper... It is designed to limit piston rebound.
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  #6  
Old 01-09-2020, 11:04 AM
Kragman

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Thanks again 56S.
I was looking at 1050 or so to be the safe subsonic limit, so if a .177 NP2 would shoot heavies around that velocity I felt it might be preferable to a .22
Looks like 950 is where its at, and coincidentally the .177s are probably around that velocity with 10s.
May be better for general use than a .22 running 750/800 with 14.3s.
Or at least similar enough that I don't care which caliber I end up with.
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  #7  
Old 01-09-2020, 02:08 PM
56S

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I like the 10.5 Crosmans

But there's a lot to be said for going to Walmart for a cheap tin of the 14.3's

A did once find the 177 10.5 heavies at Walmart and clean them out.

Right now I working off a box of the Crosman 10.5 Domes and using the tins of the 14.3 floor sweepings from Walmart in the .22.

For some reason the Crosman guns do shoot well with the Crosman ammo.
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