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-   -   552 Stamped Checkering Redo (https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=568540)

Bradical 12-18-2014 05:37 PM

552 Stamped Checkering Redo
 
Has anyone ever attempted to correct or enhance the factory stamped imitation checkering on a stock?

What I'm considering is to follow the pattern and create actual checkering mirroring the original pattern.

Here are pics. Mind this was minimal sanding. Finish was removed with heat gun and pine scraper. Thanks.

http://i.imgur.com/1h15Gig.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/z9YwKZw.jpg

Oldblades 12-18-2014 07:31 PM

Boy, that looks like tough duty even for someone with experience.
Running a cutter across those ridges would probably be akin to driving across a freshly plowed field.

pipestone 12-18-2014 09:17 PM

:yikes:...thats quite an undertaking...amazing :t

Looks like a good platform for a stippling job though :eek:


God Bless America,
pipestone

noremf 12-19-2014 11:08 PM

Faux Stippling
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by pipestone (Post 5225399)
:yikes:...thats quite an undertaking...amazing :t

Looks like a good platform for a stippling job though :eek:


God Bless America,
pipestone

Off the thread somewhat but you can do that area in a Faux stippling which can be removed if you don't like it.

I did this CZ452 trainer stock for my then 6 year old granddaughter and she demanded that the pistol grip be like my "really heavy target rifle" which would either be my 1903 or 1907 Anschutz.

I practiced stippling and found out it was a skill I was never going to master even with a ton of support from RFC members. And I tried checkering and it was a disaster so I don't do either.

I then pondered Faux Stippling and after messing around with a variety of ways to do that I settled on one.

The results look like so:

http://i.imgur.com/shSKqa9.jpg

The lacquer finish was removed and she insisted that the wood be like "that Beech" stuff you have on one of "Grannies" end tables which is aged Beech.

100 year old Beech has a distinct cinnamon color and the color in the pic is pretty close to the actual up close and personal color, at least on my monitor.

Took me longer to get the color then it did to do the Faux Stippling. Even at 6years old girls are already women and I spent almost a month off and on adding a little of this and a little of that and a tad of this and a tad of that until she was satisfied.

I "shot" the finish immediately after she said it was OK.

You can see the Faux Stippling on the handgrip and a close up which is almost an exact match to the stippling on my Annies.

Difference is I can remove that if I want to.

I don't know if this would be applicable to this thread but one can screw with the process etc. for around $10 and decide.

If anybody is interest in "how" let me know via PM and I can send you a PDF file.

If somebody here is just interested in an overview, the process involves black Plasti Dip and one of two Sherwin Williams abrasive additives called Sand Finish Additive or Shark Grip. Difference is abrasive particle size.

Gotta practice some first on scrap wood.

Been on coming on 3 years now and shows no wear and even if it did I can patch easily.

Just thought I would throw this out since pipestone (Stippling) did.

noremf(George)

SGW Gunsmith 12-20-2014 10:55 AM

Impressed checkering, as done on the Remington 700, and their other stocks can be reversed, and positive diamonds created. I have done quite a few walnut Remington stocks because that impressed checkering offers nothing for function and cosmetic appearance is dubious. The way I did it was to use a 90-degree single line cutter, and cut into the "impressed" diamonds, which then created new checkering from the wood surrounding the impressed diamonds. American Walnut, at least the wood used on the Remington guns, is most often, a course grained stock wood. What that means is the tops of the diamonds can easily pop off if you try to "point-up" that raw stock wood. If you plan on trying to cut new checkering into that stock, I would suggest that you first apply finish into the wood you plan to checker. Once the finish has cured and hardened, the wood will be harder and less likely to allow the crests of the new diamonds you will be creating, to pop off, or the softer areas in the wood to "fuzz-up". Don't try to cut to full depth on the first pass with the 90-degree tool, but cut to about 1/3 depth in each direction. If you see that the finish has been cut away, then reapply more finish and let that finish harden up the stockwood once again. It's going to depend on how well the stockwood takes to the cutter.

So, yes it can be done.

Bradical 12-20-2014 07:30 PM

... yes it can be done
 
Thank you all for your replies. Interesting idea there noremf. Something I'll keep in mind for another project.

SGW, last Wednesday I ordered a Den-Bart checkering cutter, product # 610372 and a handle with the belief that I could slowly cut into the stamped pattern and reveal some nice checkering in its place. You've confirmed my belief and saved me a ton of frustration with recommending I finish the wood first. I was headed down the wrong path and would have attempted without refinishing. Thanks for sharing your knowledge.

I'll post pics of my attempt. The good, the bad, and the ugly.

SGW Gunsmith 12-21-2014 08:39 AM

To me, it is extremely difficult to checker "bare" gunstocks, especially those with open pores like American Walnut has. What I have found long ago, is, if that cutter hits a large open pore in the wood, that American Walnut is often found to have, the single line cutter will have a tendency to follow that pore, or open grain, and give you fits trying to cut a straight line.

noremf 12-21-2014 09:11 AM

Another example
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Bradical (Post 5227191)
Thank you all for your replies. Interesting idea there noremf. Something I'll keep in mind for another project.

SGW, last Wednesday I ordered a Den-Bart checkering cutter, product # 610372 and a handle with the belief that I could slowly cut into the stamped pattern and reveal some nice checkering in its place. You've confirmed my belief and saved me a ton of frustration with recommending I finish the wood first. I was headed down the wrong path and would have attempted without refinishing. Thanks for sharing your knowledge.

I'll post pics of my attempt. The good, the bad, and the ugly.

Another example to keep in mind maybe.

http://i.imgur.com/9mewJz0.jpg

This is the grip area on one of those Airsoft guns that my 11 year old grandson did.

Tad rougher then what is on the Annie target rifles but that is the way he wanted it.

noremf(George)

SGW Gunsmith 12-21-2014 12:10 PM

I've tried "heat-stippling" using an electric wood burning pen on AR-15 and Glock plastic grips. Never tried "cold" stippling.

http://i915.photobucket.com/albums/a...at-Stipple.jpg

Plastic is a different critter, than trying to stipple some of the softer wood seen on gunstocks. I'd avoid doing any stippling on gunstock wood unless the wood is pretty hard with a tight grain and tiny pores. The stippling, and checkering also, that I've seen on some foreign shotguns with soft wood has looked really horrible and looks more like a terrible accident befell the stock.

Here's a stippling tool I made up and sent to an RFC member who wanted to try his hand at stippling some wood grips he made for a Ruger Mark pistol. Never did hear
about how that worked out......................or didn't.

http://i915.photobucket.com/albums/a...ps9c15264f.jpg

ek-marlin-424 12-22-2014 10:02 AM

I haven't yet tried cutting over stamped checkering like that but would follow SGW's suggestions and maybe add that setting up your S-1 cutter to cut on the pull stroke, and picking up an F-1 fine cutter to cut on the push stroke would help round out your tools. The short S cutter is best for finishing up the lines at the borders, and the F cutter is best for cutting the length of the lines, as it'll follow the existing pattern better than the short cutter. I'd consider getting a scalpel type razor blade to very gently slice over the existing checkering so it can open up a road for the cutters, because big pores and wavy grain will want to pull the cutter astray. Finally, practice on some pieces of scrap walnut first to get a feel for the tools before scratching up the real thing. It'll be worth it- my two cents.

Good luck and show us how you do!

Bradical 12-29-2014 11:33 AM

It can be done ... but go very slowly
 
I received the cutting tool and experimented with it a bit. I was surprised by how fast it cuts. To get this to look good will require patients and careful cutting. However, early indications are encouraging. I'm going to look into that F-1 cutter as well. I have a new appreciation for those $3000 plus fine grade o/u shot guns I covet. Thanks for all the tips, guys.

Bradical 06-10-2015 11:21 AM

Rotisserie
 
So, I finally had some time to revisit this project. But, before I attempted to start carving into the impressed checking I wanted to make a rotisserie and thought I’d share my solution.

I went to Home Depot and bought two casters and rubber floor protectors. I hacked sawed off the casters wheel tines, creating a flat surface for the rubber floor protector to rest upon. Some scrap butcher block counter top worked perfectly for attachment to the wood vise. All that was needed was a solid stop to hold the opposing caster. Fortunately, my tool box provided a quick solution. Light compression is all that is needed to hold the stock firmly in place.

The rotisserie makes it much easier for me to cut a straighter line since I can keep my eye directly above the stock as I go. The carving so far is going pretty well. But, boy, is it easy to screw up and get knocked of your line. Light pressure on the cutting tool with short strokes seems to work best for me to establish a line. I’ve got my fingers crossed that this is going to turn out OK.
http://i.imgur.com/wLdl5RA.jpg

SGW Gunsmith 06-10-2015 02:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bradical (Post 5404290)
So, I finally had some time to revisit this project. But, before I attempted to start carving into the impressed checking I wanted to make a rotisserie and thought Id share my solution.

I went to Home Depot and bought two casters and rubber floor protectors. I hacked sawed off the casters wheel tines, creating a flat surface for the rubber floor protector to rest upon. Some scrap butcher block counter top worked perfectly for attachment to the wood vise. All that was needed was a solid stop to hold the opposing caster. Fortunately, my tool box provided a quick solution. Light compression is all that is needed to hold the stock firmly in place.

The rotisserie makes it much easier for me to cut a straighter line since I can keep my eye directly above the stock as I go. The carving so far is going pretty well. But, boy, is it easy to screw up and get knocked of your line. Light pressure on the cutting tool with short strokes seems to work best for me to establish a line. Ive got my fingers crossed that this is going to turn out OK.
http://i1311.photobucket.com/albums/...ps1kkhejb6.jpg

Looks like you're on the right track. It NEVER ceases to amaze me what ingenious devices that folks on RFC come up with to make a tough job go easier. I understand the issue with your cutting tool wanting to jump off track. Getting the first cut to partial depth, and, to stay straight is like giving a mouse a vasectomy. You gotta go slow and be very deliberate on how your cutting process progresses. Hope to see some pictures when you get those diamonds pointed up. :bthumb:

Bradical 07-23-2015 01:57 PM

Checkering Update
 
With the F-1 fine cutter on my bench, I started in on the cutting again. To say this is not easy to do well, is an extraordinary understatement. I'm am not worthy and a complete amateur. My only solace is that the impressed checking was complete garbage upon which even an amateur could improve.

Following the advice of the pros as been indispensable - thanks. I have gained a great appreciation for this art.

http://i.imgur.com/cHOPxO0.jpg

SGW Gunsmith 07-23-2015 02:11 PM

[email protected]@KS really good so far. One suggestion, if you don't mind. Save the border, or edge of the pattern lines until last for cutting to full depth and width. That way, you can take care of any over-runs that might happen. :bthumb:


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