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  #1  
Old 12-27-2016, 01:53 PM
454ho

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M60 cracked receiver



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My brother was given an older Glenfield Model 60, but the receiver is cracked. Somebody had JB welded it. I am not familiar with these, but he handed it to me and asked if I could fix it properly for him. Well, I just bought an old style receiver on GB just now to replace his.

When I was on GB I saw someone trying to sell a damaged one with the exact same crack this one has. Would like to understand why these cracked in the first place. Is this due to shooting hyper-velocity or something? Is this a common problem with these rifles?





Any ideas?
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  #2  
Old 12-27-2016, 02:01 PM
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I'm gonna guess that the buffer fell to bits and the rifle continued to be used, possibly with hyper-velocity ammo?

Just my guess.

You did the right thing finding a replacement because I cant really think of a repair that will last long on these zinc die cast receivers.

Peter.
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  #3  
Old 12-27-2016, 02:57 PM
454ho

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Thanks Peter. Like I said, I know nothing about these rifles. I googled bolt buffer to see what it looked like. My brother's gun has one, it is off white or yellow color and looks like it could be original. Not cracked or damaged in any way. And since the buffer is attached to the hammer frame, I do not see how the pot metal receiver would be taking the recoil stress.

Since the crack is opposite the ejection port, and it seems to be cracked outward, could this be the result of an OOB discharge? Maybe with a Stinger that did not seat all the way into the chamber?
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  #4  
Old 12-27-2016, 03:04 PM
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The original owner likely wrapped it around a tree trunk when he ran out of ammo.
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  #5  
Old 12-27-2016, 04:28 PM
454ho

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ArrowDodger View Post
The original owner likely wrapped it around a tree trunk when he ran out of ammo.
I think you may be right. Mystery solved!

Just came in from cleaning it up. Once I got all the gunk out of the action it was obvious. There is a deep rectangular 'dimple' on the inside that exactly matches the hold-open teat on the back side of the charging handle. Either the rifle fell onto the charge handle or someone whacked it on a tree.

I feel better knowing the replacement receiver should fix her up good as new. Not too expensive, $6 for the part, $10 shipping and $15 for the FFL transfer.

Going to go shoot it as is tomorrow and see if it groups at 25 yards. Then I will decide how much work I want to put into fixing the cosmetic issues.
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  #6  
Old 12-27-2016, 05:18 PM
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I thought they were aluminum, not zinc????
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Old 12-27-2016, 06:50 PM
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They look like some sort of die casting to me which usually uses an aluminium-zinc alloy, I think you fellas call it "pot metal." (some in England call it "monkey metal" and some have less kind names for it, LOL.)
This is favoured because it renders itself very well to intricate shapes when pressure cast into a die.

Glad you have a theory as to the cause of the damage, I must admit I struggled to determine the crack's location from the photos, so only made an educated guess.

Peter.

Last edited by fabpeter; 12-27-2016 at 06:53 PM.
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Old 12-28-2016, 10:06 PM
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I thought they were aluminum, not zinc????
They are. Most likely Alloy A380, as this is one of the most common alloys for die-cast aluminum gun parts. It's ~85% aluminum, ~3% zinc, with the balance being copper, silicon and a few other trace elements.

"Pot metal" has traditionally referred to alloys that are mainly composed of zinc. Zamak is the most common zinc alloy used for die cast parts. it's ~90% zinc, ~4% aluminum with the balance being a few other trace elements.

I believe that the feed throat, trigger (only the blade), and some of the front sights (depends on the model) are the only zinc parts on the Marlin 22 autos.
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  #9  
Old 12-28-2016, 11:52 PM
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I recently started reworking my old model 60, and stripped off the receiver and "blued" it with Birchwood Casey Aluminum Black. After a fashion, I finally got a decent, relatively consistent color on it. I also cleaned off the front sight, and it immediately turned jet black and seems like it will probably rub off... Zinc/pot metal for sure. Definitely two different metals.
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Old 01-02-2017, 06:57 PM
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I took this rifle to the range Saturday. With CCI SV, even with a cracked receiver, it was putting 5 shots under a dime using a make-shift rest at 25 yards. Decided it has potential, so I am going to do a more extensive rebuild rather than just replacing the reciever.

Got to work on it some today and thought I would post a few pictures. Here is what I am starting with.







As you can see, the stock has been refinished and it was a pretty crappy job. The top coat looked like it was brushed on with a mop. There are several places it has been peeled or scraped off. Also the stock was heavily sanded and the factory pressed checkering is partially sanded away. No way to fix it completely, but I hope to make it look better.

Here is the cracked receiver, after I removed the epoxy that was glopped on on the outside





And this photo shows the impression on the inside of the receiver made by the bolt charging handle. It took quite a whack to do that. No wonder it cracked.



So I got it stripped down and will start going thru piece by piece cleaning and inspecting. Will replace what needs to be replaced.





Stripping the stock was a challenge. Not sure if it was poly-urethane or something else. It definitely was not lacquer. Still needs a lot of work, but I think I can definitely improve on the last time it was refinished. Will probably use TruOil on it.

The metal also needs a lot of work. Looks like someone spray-painted the barrel and mag tube black years ago. I've never tried bluing before, so this might be an opportunity to learn.

I may also try my hand at adding pillars and glass bedding the stock. It's kind of cool to work on a free gun, there is nothing I can do that will devalue it.
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  #11  
Old 01-02-2017, 07:26 PM
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I've seen receivers like that from a round going off inside but Not in the Chamber. Can cause more than one to discharge. Once even saw where a whole magazine went BANG.
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  #12  
Old 01-27-2017, 06:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 454ho View Post
I took this rifle to the range Saturday. With CCI SV, even with a cracked receiver, it was putting 5 shots under a dime using a make-shift rest at 25 yards. Decided it has potential, so I am going to do a more extensive rebuild rather than just replacing the reciever.

Got to work on it some today and thought I would post a few pictures. Here is what I am starting with.







As you can see, the stock has been refinished and it was a pretty crappy job. The top coat looked like it was brushed on with a mop. There are several places it has been peeled or scraped off. Also the stock was heavily sanded and the factory pressed checkering is partially sanded away. No way to fix it completely, but I hope to make it look better.

Here is the cracked receiver, after I removed the epoxy that was glopped on on the outside





And this photo shows the impression on the inside of the receiver made by the bolt charging handle. It took quite a whack to do that. No wonder it cracked.



So I got it stripped down and will start going thru piece by piece cleaning and inspecting. Will replace what needs to be replaced.





Stripping the stock was a challenge. Not sure if it was poly-urethane or something else. It definitely was not lacquer. Still needs a lot of work, but I think I can definitely improve on the last time it was refinished. Will probably use TruOil on it.

The metal also needs a lot of work. Looks like someone spray-painted the barrel and mag tube black years ago. I've never tried bluing before, so this might be an opportunity to learn.

I may also try my hand at adding pillars and glass bedding the stock. It's kind of cool to work on a free gun, there is nothing I can do that will devalue it.
Keep us informed, as you progress, on your transformation. Pictures would be nice.
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  #13  
Old 01-27-2017, 09:22 AM
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Nice write-up with pictures...
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  #14  
Old 01-28-2017, 09:17 AM
454ho

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Originally Posted by powwowell View Post
Keep us informed, as you progress, on your transformation. Pictures would be nice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmohr3 View Post
Nice write-up with pictures...
Thanks for the kind words. Progress on this will be slow. I've got a few other projects I am working on at the same time. Also, not sure how far I want to take this rifle just yet. As I said, it belongs to my brother and he just wanted me to take it to clean it up and get it shooting.

Replacing the cracked receiver cost me $6 for the part plus $10 shipping and a $20 FFL transfer fee. I could easily spend another $50-$70 on a new feed ramp, set of springs and recoil buffer, but I really don't want to be $100 down on a freebie 40+ year old abused rifle.

So what I intend to do is finish striping the stock, iron out the dents and finish sand it. Then I'll hit it with a few coats of spray on lacquer to protect the wood. I'll re-assemble with the new receiver and see how it shoots. If it feeds and functions properly, I may just call it quits at that point.
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  #15  
Old 02-04-2017, 07:00 PM
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Goodness it looked like it was ran over by a 3 wheeler. Keep up the good work.
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